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Old 10-13-2018, 01:39 PM   #1
wiredgeorge
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Greenball Transmaster tires

Note I didn't say Tourmax. The Transmaster line is at Sams and their 15" E rated tire is under $70. A person asked about these tires a year ago and didn't get a response. Can't figure out why as they are sold at Sam's, Walmart and Costco where lots of folks buy tires. Not much in the way of reviews on these tires either. When funds allow, my Carlisle 15" E rated tires will be replaced as they are 2015 vintage. They look OK but the constant chatter about tires ageing out has made me more aware that new rubber is a good idea. I will probably go with Carlisle tires again (Discount Tire sells them) or have them order in Maxxis tires. New rims/16" tires would be too much expense for me and I am not sure if there would be issues increasing tire size. Anyone with Transmaster experience?
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Old 10-13-2018, 05:24 PM   #2
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George, you got good service out of your Carlisle tires and they are running about $68.00 at Walmart. Any reason you have given thought to changing over to some brand nobody ever heard of before?
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Old 10-13-2018, 07:39 PM   #3
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Id buy the Maxxis over the others all day long.
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Old 10-13-2018, 09:07 PM   #4
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Hear is a link to Greenball. They provide the Transmaster ST brand.

If you travel regularly with your RV don't use bias ply tires. RVIA does not recommend their use on any RV trailers with 14" or larger tires.

http://www.greenball.com/brands/tran...transmaster-st


NOTE: For those of you that read my tire posts you will see that the Transmaster is one of the brands that certifies their ST235/80R16 LRE at 3500# @ 80 PSI.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:03 AM   #5
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We ran a set of Discount Tire Greenballs on our TT about 9-10 years ago. Don't remember if they where Transmasters or not. We got pertnear 5 years and close to 10,000 miles of use out of em. So I guess they was a good tire. FWIW... that TT came with Duro's. Then we put on the Greenball's. In fact, all of the tires we've run on our RV's, dating back to our 1991 Dutchman, except the set we're running now (Maxxis) have been different sets of China Bombs. Knock on wood ... not a single boom yet!

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Old 10-14-2018, 08:42 AM   #6
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Second post today I read and the poster said the tires looked Okay. Read up on tires. Looks of a tire or how much tread is on them is NO way to determine if the tire is good or failing.
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Old 10-14-2018, 02:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken / Claudia View Post
Second post today I read and the poster said the tires looked Okay. Read up on tires. Looks of a tire or how much tread is on them is NO way to determine if the tire is good or failing.

Uh, Ken/Claudia, You might actually read my post and note I have been reading about tires and sure as heck don't need you to tell me what to do. I will also point out, my current tires are about three years old and show no signs of damage or nor have had any issues and are a reliable brand. I said I was THINKING about replacement (at this time) due to aging as the most common popular wisdom on this site is to do this at three years. If you had any point, other than trying to be condescending or insulting, I am not seeing it.
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Old 10-14-2018, 03:11 PM   #8
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George, I could be wrong but I dont think this was pointed at you but at the point the looks of a tire come up twice. The biggest mistake and a common error just prior to a tire letting is "they looked good and still had lots of thread." Rookies need lots of training on this. I think you read it wrong. JM2C.
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Old 10-15-2018, 10:25 AM   #9
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Just pointing out your the one who said "They look OK." Not condescending in my book. Here is a question to you; Is looking at a tire a fair and correct way to determine if it's good or bad?
I cannot recall how many times dealing with someone with a flat tire or more and they say "the tire(s) looked good, it had lots of tread. I do not know why it blew."
Sorry you felt the way you did.
Not long along another member on here reported flats or blowouts and made a statement he suspected it was due to being exposed to sunlight as I recall. I suggested that the age might be the or a cause. He checked and found them way over due for replacement by age. I also think he said the tires had lots of tread.
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Old 10-15-2018, 06:35 PM   #10
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Think of the tire tread as the component that protects the carcass and provides the surface the vehicle rides on. In measuring a tire's strength the tread area contributes ZERO to the tire's ability to carry it's load. Basically it's just glued/bonded to the carcass.


Almost all the materials that provide a tire's strength - ability to carry it's designed load capacity - are hidden beneath the tire tread area. The first place to look for clues to a tire's well beaning are it's sidewalls, both inner and outer. They will crack and sometimes grow small bubbles. Another more visible clue will be when a tire's running temperature starts to increase higher than the others. Pretty soon it will start to grow taller. A telltale of tread separation.
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Old 10-15-2018, 07:59 PM   #11
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Once again, no one addressed the question regarding Greenball tires but took the time to make the same statements regarding the looks of tires vis a vis their safety. Sorry I even asked about Greenball tires as the comments from folks who have no knowledge regarding the particular question asked seem to continually feel the need to pontificate. Thanks. Will not ask again. I am just pointing this out and not to anyone in particular!
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Old 10-16-2018, 08:41 AM   #12
Ken / Claudia
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All I did was , in my opinion point out a bad way to determine if tires are good or bad, apologized for offending you. Asked a simple question and your upset again and will not answer the question. Forums are all about opinions and facts, when we share we will learn and make our own opinions. My last comment on this post.
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Old 10-26-2018, 07:50 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWtheMan View Post
Think of the tire tread as the component that protects the carcass and provides the surface the vehicle rides on. In measuring a tire's strength the tread area contributes ZERO to the tire's ability to carry it's load. Basically it's just glued/bonded to the carcass.


Almost all the materials that provide a tire's strength - ability to carry it's designed load capacity - are hidden beneath the tire tread area. The first place to look for clues to a tire's well beaning are it's sidewalls, both inner and outer. They will crack and sometimes grow small bubbles. Another more visible clue will be when a tire's running temperature starts to increase higher than the others. Pretty soon it will start to grow taller. A telltale of tread separation.

I agree that an increase in running temperature when the ambient is similar and you have not increased the load and are still running the tire sidewall inflation number associated with it's "Max" load could be an indication of potential separation.


External measurement (IR gun) isn't repeatable enough as you need running temperature at constant speed for at least 10 miles. With a TPMS and a few notations you should be able to see a trend of increasing temperature. If you do I suggest you have the tire or tires inispectedby a certified Tire Tech not just walk around look at by the guy that mounts tires.
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Old 10-26-2018, 08:55 AM   #14
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Serious question...where might one find a "certified tire tech"?
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Old 10-26-2018, 09:13 AM   #15
Tireman9
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Serious question...where might one find a "certified tire tech"?

You could call around and ask if they have a TIA Certified tech.


Tire Industry Association.


https://www.tireindustry.org/certifi...re-service-ats


I will look for a list.
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Old 10-26-2018, 11:42 AM   #16
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Serious question...where might one find a "certified tire tech"?

Ask the manager of the retailer you're doing business with.


A close friend of mine has a son that manages a nationally known retail tire business. To become a manager he had to successfully complete all mandatory prerequisites to become a certified tire tech.
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Old 10-26-2018, 12:03 PM   #17
CWtheMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wiredgeorge View Post
Note I didn't say Tourmax. The Transmaster line is at Sams and their 15" E rated tire is under $70. A person asked about these tires a year ago and didn't get a response. Can't figure out why as they are sold at Sam's, Walmart and Costco where lots of folks buy tires. Not much in the way of reviews on these tires either. When funds allow, my Carlisle 15" E rated tires will be replaced as they are 2015 vintage. They look OK but the constant chatter about tires ageing out has made me more aware that new rubber is a good idea. I will probably go with Carlisle tires again (Discount Tire sells them) or have them order in Maxxis tires. New rims/16" tires would be too much expense for me and I am not sure if there would be issues increasing tire size. Anyone with Transmaster experience?

Are you looking for antidotal, factual, official?


There are ZERO complaints on this particular tire on file with NHTSA.

https://tirereviews.co/greenball-tra...t-radial-7071/

https://www.keystonerv.com/media/104...._brochure.pdf
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Old 10-26-2018, 01:07 PM   #18
bob91yj
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My local Discount Tire shop manager seems to like the Greenball tires better than the Carlisles. I must admit that I haven't been overly impressed with Carlisles that I use on my enclosed car hauler...then again, I'm hard on equipment.
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Old 10-26-2018, 03:15 PM   #19
Tireman9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob91yj View Post
Serious question...where might one find a "certified tire tech"?

check this web site

https://www.tireindustry.org/dealers
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Old 10-26-2018, 03:39 PM   #20
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Cal, can certify that I have never been a fan of ST tires. We purchased a bumper pull with 15" LRD Goodride tires for commuting to AZ from WA. I replaced them the first week with Goodyear Endurance LRE tires. They cost more than the average china bomb, however I will run them for 5 or 6 years. The 4 Goodride tires sold in a day on CL for 200 bucks, so that offset some of the cost of quality replacements. Trailer dealer said to run them for a year. NOT! Chris
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