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Old 05-02-2014, 06:46 PM   #1
gvansickle1
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Correct Tire Pressure

Quick question for you experienced folk; the stated Max pressure for my TT tires is 65 lbs. but dealer filled them to 55 lbs. and when questioned stated that this was the correct "cold" tire pressure. I tend to believe him as I understand that they (tires) will heat up under use but as I'm a bit anal I had to ask; leave them at 55 lbs. Or set fill'em up to 65?
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:26 PM   #2
JRTJH
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My tires say, "Max COLD inflation pressure 65 PSI" At 55PSI they are underinflated. Your dealer needs to reread the tire manual.
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:07 PM   #3
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Inflate them to 65. Read the little label on the side of trailer and it will tell you where you should be. Trust that label...not the dealer. He's off base.
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:17 PM   #4
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Thank you theeyres/JRTJH!

Appreciate it gents! I'd really hate to have a blow-out or worse this early on!
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Old 05-03-2014, 03:59 AM   #5
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Run max cold pressure for the best wear. I have read several threads on this where the engineers have turned it into a rocket project by breaking it down to tire pressure vs trailer weight on each axle, blah, blah, but that's what engineers do. Max inflation means less surface contact, less heat, and thus less wear.
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Old 05-03-2014, 04:53 AM   #6
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But if you take to high pressure things go bumping.
Made spreadsheet for it but if you have ST tires , the maximum load has to be lowered by 15% first to give it the same deflection of a LT tire wich make them last longer. Then the needed pressure is mostly that pressure needed for the maximum load, yours 65 psi, wich is not the maximum pressure of the tire.

So if you can give me here maximum load and needed pressure for that of tires.
And GAWR ( gross axle weight ratings) of Travel trailer and number of wheels and axles, I can calculate the pressure for you. Will give a picture of filled in spreadsheet in my answer.

Best would be seperatate weighed wheel( pair) loads in the loading you drive.
But this is probably not done yet.
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Old 05-03-2014, 06:10 AM   #7
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Just what is a correct tire pressure for RV trailer tires? Under every day normal circumstances there is a single answer with three possible locations to look for the recommended tire pressure. The trailer's federal certification label, a tire placard or in the trailer's owner's manual.

Correct tire pressures are synonymous with recommended tire pressures.

Tire manufacturers build tires and produce load inflation charts for each different size. That is the end of their responsibility.

Vehicle manufacturers select tire sizes and set recommended tire pressures that become the standard for the vehicle they are fitted to. In fact, they are directed to do so by the regulatory authority (DOT).

So, bottom line, use the information provide with your vehicle for its tire pressures. Second guessing the vehicle manufacturers recommended tire pressures will surely shorten the tires life expectancy.

CW

p.s. Tires found to be 20% below the vehicle manufactures recommended tire pressure is considered to be in a "run flat" condition and needs to be removed and inspected by someone experienced in such inspections.
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Old 05-03-2014, 07:25 AM   #8
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How about this one...my trailer says tires should be a specific size, and they are. They also say they they should be at 50 psi cold. When I look on the tire it says max psi of 50.

So do u run them at 50 cold? Just a little under like 48 or 45? You would think the tires are wrong but the sticker says that exact size and that's how it came out if the factory. So what gives?
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Old 05-03-2014, 07:29 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by {tpc} View Post
How about this one...my trailer says tires should be a specific size, and they are. They also say they they should be at 50 psi cold. When I look on the tire it says max psi of 50.

So do u run them at 50 cold? Just a little under like 48 or 45? You would think the tires are wrong but the sticker says that exact size and that's how it came out if the factory. So what gives?
Look at your tires again, a little closer, it most likely says Max 50 psi COLD. As in before traveling, not down the road 50 miles at a gas station after they have warmed up.
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:09 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by jadatis View Post
But if you take to high pressure things go bumping.
Made spreadsheet for it but if you have ST tires , the maximum load has to be lowered by 15% first to give it the same deflection of a LT tire wich make them last longer. Then the needed pressure is mostly that pressure needed for the maximum load, yours 65 psi, wich is not the maximum pressure of the tire.

So if you can give me here maximum load and needed pressure for that of tires.
And GAWR ( gross axle weight ratings) of Travel trailer and number of wheels and axles, I can calculate the pressure for you. Will give a picture of filled in spreadsheet in my answer.

Best would be seperatate weighed wheel( pair) loads in the loading you drive.
But this is probably not done yet.
Now THIS is a good example of having too much time on your hands.
I run all of mine at the max pressure indicated on the tire and get 70K miles out of Michelins on my truck. The Load Range E Maxxis on the trailer gets 80lbs. That's good enough for me.
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:48 AM   #11
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Look at your tires again, a little closer, it most likely says Max 50 psi COLD. As in before traveling, not down the road 50 miles at a gas station after they have warmed up.
Tire manufacturerare are required to give the maximum load capacity of the tire on its sidewall. They are also required to list the amount of tire pressure needed to provide that maximum load capacity.

Once someone starts worrying about a tires increasing pressures caused by heat they are going to have to do some research on thermal equilibrium as it applies to tires.

A tire's correct pressure is set at what is considered its cold condition. Anytime after three hours of inactivity will normally suffice.

CW
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Old 05-03-2014, 09:37 AM   #12
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in the summertime here in Texas the "COLD" pressure can vary 5-6 psi from daylight to late afternoon, not to mention the sunny side to shady side thingy....
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Old 05-03-2014, 10:04 AM   #13
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in the summertime here in Texas the "COLD" pressure can vary 5-6 psi from daylight to late afternoon, not to mention the sunny side to shady side thingy....

That kind of thermal condition does not present a problem. Set them as cold.

CW
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Old 05-03-2014, 10:17 AM   #14
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That kind of thermal condition does not present a problem. Set them as cold.

CW
So, if I check and inflate them to max (50lbs) at 1630 the afternoon before I leave and then re-check them at 0600 as I'm hooking up and they read 44lbs I should inflate them to 50psi before I tow. Then if I check them at 1700 that afternoon (minimum 3 hrs after arrival) and they read 56lbs, I should deflate them to 50lbs.

Man this could get really busy...
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Old 05-03-2014, 12:32 PM   #15
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Trick is to fill the tires with that high cold pressure so its still enaugh when its colder and not to high that things go bumping.
Then fill it once and check it cold ( inside tire temp is outside tire temp) every month and you are OK.
If temperature varies during season adjust it but relatively small cold temperature chanches dont worry about.

But topic starter : give the answers to my last post and I will calculate.
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Old 05-03-2014, 04:43 PM   #16
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So, if I check and inflate them to max (50lbs) at 1630 the afternoon before I leave and then re-check them at 0600 as I'm hooking up and they read 44lbs I should inflate them to 50psi before I tow. Then if I check them at 1700 that afternoon (minimum 3 hrs after arrival) and they read 56lbs, I should deflate them to 50lbs.

Man this could get really busy...
All correct.

CW
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Old 05-03-2014, 06:28 PM   #17
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So, if I check and inflate them to max (50lbs) at 1630 the afternoon before I leave and then re-check them at 0600 as I'm hooking up and they read 44lbs I should inflate them to 50psi before I tow. Then if I check them at 1700 that afternoon (minimum 3 hrs after arrival) and they read 56lbs, I should deflate them to 50lbs.

Man this could get really busy...
Javi -
Yes, we could all be kept very busy with our tires - checking pressure, inflating, rechecking, deflating, ...... How much time and energy are really necessary to constantly monitor tire pressure while on holidays? Most folks would check before first heading out and make daily or frequent checks along the way to make sure that proper tire pressure is being maintained.

For those who have a TPMS, a portable 110v compressor (or both) with them this task is reasonably simple and convenient. When the tire pressure falls too low, you haul out your compressor and inflate your tires. For those who don't have a TPMS or a compressor, it isn't quite so convenient. They have to find a gas station that has air and we all know that they are not easy to find and when you are lucky enough to find one, gaining access to it with an RV in tow is even more difficult. For many, monitoring and especially maintaining proper air pressure while on the road is easier said than done.

While adjusting air pressure on a daily basis may be desirable, it isn't always practical. I would guess that the vast majority of RVers do not have a TPMS so it isn't easy for those folks to monitor their tires. Do they haul out a tire pressure gauge at rest stops and check their tires? I don't think so. Do they check their tires upon arrival at their campsite? I don't think so. You might see the odd one checking their tires before leaving but I can't ever remember actually seeing anyone doing this.

I'm not saying that it's okay for people to forget about their tires but I don't think we should become obsessed with the amount of air that is in or isn't in your tires at any given time during the day.

And I thought I was going on a holiday ...........
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Old 05-03-2014, 06:44 PM   #18
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Festus, I was jerking their chain just a little.

Summer temp swings here can be 50 degrees or more so it really ain't all that unusual to see tire pressures vary 5 or 6 pounds during the day.

it really ain't all that necessary to do all I described although to listen to some of these fellows their entire trips are spent inflating and deflating their trailer tires with the occasional stop to check their lug nuts...

I do carry a 110V pancake compressor and I do check my tire pressure and lug nuts before I head out on a trip but other than walking by and feeling of the hubs and tires at a pit stop I don't get that anal about it.
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Old 05-26-2014, 11:12 AM   #19
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Sorry to belabor the point, but...

what I surmise from this thread is that load is irrelevant and that psi should be set to whatever is listed on the trailer or manual.

Thus if your tires say COLD 50PSI, that's what you set it at, irrespective of whether your trailer is full or empty. Is that correct?

Just somehow don't sound right to me...

Thank you for clarifying

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Old 05-26-2014, 12:17 PM   #20
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Thus if your tires say COLD 50PSI, that's what you set it at, irrespective of whether your trailer is full or empty. Is that correct?
siberian
After reading through this and other "tire pressure" threads, I'm not if one can surmise anything.

Some members adjust the pressure on their tow vehicle depending whether they are towing or not towing. Others don't.

When towing our 5th wheel, I don't adjust the pressure of the 5th wheel tires. The cold pressure on the Maxxis is 80 psi and the rims are rated for that and that is the pressure I try to maintain - 80 lbs. The TPMS is set for 80 lbs with "alarms" set for temp and pressure above and below that.

I am not about to adjust the tire pressure after I add another 100 lbs+- of food, clothing and other misc stuff before heading out. The 5th wheel is mostly loaded before heading out and all we do is add food, clothing, etc. It's not going to make any significant difference in the overall weight.

Perhaps in my effort to adhere to the KISS principle, I am being negligent with respect to the tires on the Cougar. It says 80 psi on the tires and that's what they get.
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