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Old 11-02-2013, 03:08 PM   #1
Dadstoy
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Stabilizers

My trailer is parked in the barn with a cement floor for the winter. Should I lower the hand crank stabilizers to take the weight off the tires?
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:18 PM   #2
BulletOwner1
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The stabilizer jacks are not designed to take weight off the tires. Just to stabilize the movement of the RV. So if you want substantial weight off the tires or even off the floor completely you will have to jack up and block the axles (with a real jack).

Is there a particular reason you want to do this? There are usually only a few reasons that tires fail and sitting on concrete over the winter, I don't think, is one of them. Wear, age, out of alignment, but not just sitting especially it they stay dry and out of the sun. Most RV tires don't wear out, they age out. 6/7 years tops.

If I'm wrong, let me know. I can take it.
Richard
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:41 PM   #3
rayjoanlough
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Actually all you need to do is run your rig up on your plastic blocks or run your rig up on pressure treated 2X10s. Not a good idea to have the tire on cement for storage purpose.
JMHO
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:52 PM   #4
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Thats what I heard. Its not good for your tires to sit in one position for 6 months. I asked about the stabilizer jacks because I have seen them extended to where the tires are off the ground. They don't look that stout to me. I do have HD jack stands I could put under the frame to support it.
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Old 11-02-2013, 06:32 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BulletOwner1 View Post
The stabilizer jacks are not designed to take weight off the tires. Just to stabilize the movement of the RV. So if you want substantial weight off the tires or even off the floor completely you will have to jack up and block the axles (with a real jack).

Is there a particular reason you want to do this? There are usually only a few reasons that tires fail and sitting on concrete over the winter, I don't think, is one of them. Wear, age, out of alignment, but not just sitting especially it they stay dry and out of the sun. Most RV tires don't wear out, they age out. 6/7 years tops.

If I'm wrong, let me know. I can take it.
Richard

The stabilizer jacks are not designed to lift the trailer off the wheels (although they will on mine) but they do take weight off the tires by lifting the trailer somewhat to stabilize it. Ive heard all kinds of advice but not seen any manufacturer advice.
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Old 11-02-2013, 09:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BulletOwner1 View Post
The stabilizer jacks are not designed to take weight off the tires. Just to stabilize the movement of the RV. So if you want substantial weight off the tires or even off the floor completely you will have to jack up and block the axles (with a real jack).

Is there a particular reason you want to do this? There are usually only a few reasons that tires fail and sitting on concrete over the winter, I don't think, is one of them. Wear, age, out of alignment, but not just sitting especially it they stay dry and out of the sun. Most RV tires don't wear out, they age out. 6/7 years tops.

If I'm wrong, let me know. I can take it.
Richard
2013 Owners Manual from Keystone states the following:
Stabilizing Jacks
Dependent upon the type (travel-trailer / fifth-wheel), product and model purchased, the stabilizer jacks included will vary. Although stabilizer jacks come in different types and sizes, all perform the same function: To stabilize the front and rear of all recreational vehicles while parked for camping. DO NOT attempt to lift the unit with the stabilizer jacks. These are not designed to bear weight, only help stabilize the unit from movement. Please refer to the manufacturer instructions supplied with the unit for care and operation and/or www.lci1.com.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:54 AM   #7
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Only two things I can see parking on cement (1 really). Moisture from the cement, and possibly tires have a flat spot from sitting too long. I don't have that problem with our RV as we travel every couple months, but my vette I put on curved tire blocks. It takes care of the moisture and tires getting a flat spot. It stays on these blocks from October to June.
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:59 AM   #8
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This response is on the Bridgestone website. It addresses storage of tires quite well. The one part that it does not fully address is flat spots from sitting for prolonged periods of time. The response does say that flat spots MAY work themselves out, but goes on to say, not always..... I've never raised my ties off the ground for storage on any of my trailers or sports cars that were stored for winter and I've never had any damaged tires, but that certainly doesn't mean it's not a good idea.

Here's the Bridgestone article and website:



Dear Tire Doctor,

Can storing a vehicle on concrete effect the tires? Should I put barriers like plastic or other non-porous material under the tires? How about the effects of continuous storage for several days at a time with use between storage periods?

Thanks for your help on this subject.

Best Regards, Len


Dear Len,

Thank you for contacting Bridgestone and allowing us to assist you.

First of all, regarding the effects of storage:

A cool, dry, sealed garage is your best condition for storage, however, it is realized that this is not often an available option. Concrete is not the tire enemy some people think it is.

We would recommend the following steps in storing a vehicle:

1. Make sure the floor / ground surface is free of any petroleum product contamination (Oil, grease, fuel, etc.) since petroleum products will attack rubber and can cause significant damage to compound characteristics.

2. Thoroughly clean your tires with soap and water.

3. Place a barrier such as plastic, cardboard, or plywood between the tires and the ground surface.

4. Cover your tires to block out direct sunlight and ultra violet rays.

5. Do not store the vehicle in close proximity to steam pipes, electrical generators or animal manure since these accelerate oxidation of the rubber.

6. Make sure your tires are fully inflated with air.

7. When the vehicle is ready to go back into service, inspect the tires for excessive cracking in both the sidewall and tread area and check all tire air pressures. Tires will normally lose about 2 PSI per month so you should expect to find the pressures lower than when you put the vehicle into storage. Re-inflate the tires to the correct air pressure before operation.

Now, about the effects of time:

Yes, rubber compound does slowly change over time, becoming "harder" as it ages. But unless we are talking years, this would be virtually undetectable. However; the most likely effect of storage will be:

1. Flat spotting of the tires from taking a 'set' while sitting in one position for an extended length of time. This 'set' may work itself out of the tires after being put back into operation, but not always. This, of course, would result in a vibration.

2. Tires have waxes and oils specially formulated to protect against ozone damage built into their rubber compounds. When the tire rotates and flexes, these waxes and oils are forced to the tire's surface and are thus able to protect the tire. When a tire is stationary, these waxes and oils are not coming to the surface and thus the tire is at greater risk of ozone damage.

3. Several days of non-use at a time is not nearly as detrimental to tires as long storage periods. The tires would still be operated often enough to avoid excessive 'set' and the waxes and oils are being forced to the tire's surface often enough to provide adequate protection against ozone.

Best regards, Tire Doctor

http://www.bridgestonetrucktires.com...ntenance.asp#1
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Old 11-03-2013, 06:42 PM   #9
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Speaking of flat spots, when I was stationed in Alaska near Fairbanks for three and a half years, during the dead of winter (there was a LOT of dead of winter) tires would flat spot overnight! Shocks would freeze also. Was a bumpy ride for a while but the tires would round out and shocks would warm up with no apparent harm over time.
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