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Old 11-25-2021, 09:02 AM   #21
CaptnJohn
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This is my 3rd Montana. Before these I had a HC that arrived with Rainer LR F tires. I felt lucky to go 45 miles from the dealer to the tire shop where I had Sailuns waiting. Shop gave me $30 each for the 5 Rainers. They went on farm trailers, hay wagons etc. hopefully on a poop spreader. I had no faith in them. Others have hade great luck. All are a luck of the draw and at the mercy of our �� roads.
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Old 11-25-2021, 09:44 AM   #22
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You might be interested in doing some research on Boar Wheels. IMO they are the only tires and wheels to protect my crew and investment. Well worth the investment. IMO.
Stay safe.
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Old 11-25-2021, 10:31 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Mike&Sandy View Post
I hear you, I changed out the stock tires on my Cougar immediately. However, this Montana is coming with Rainier G rated tires. I can find very little to no information online about these tires. Some seem to suggest that they are Sailun's. See link.

https://www.easternmarine.com/sailun...im-8-lug-l-r-g
Tredit is a Rainier OEM.

https://www.tredittire.com/tire/rainier-st-all-steel/
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Old 11-25-2021, 10:42 AM   #24
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Thumbs up Boar Wheels

Here is the link for Boar Wheels. https://www.boarwheel.com/
Good luck and Happy Trails.
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Old 11-25-2021, 05:54 PM   #25
Tireman9
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Originally Posted by dutchmensport View Post
This is what happened to our Ranier tires. We purchased the camper brand new and it was less than 6 months later, and probably less than 2000 miles on these tires when this happened. We were a good couple hundred miles from home. This wasn't fun. I'll NEVER, NEVER, NEVER, EVER tow a trailer again if it has Ranier tires!


Difficult to be sure with only one picture and limited information but that failed tire could be the result of Run Low Sidewall Flex Failure.
Do you run a TPMS? If so what is the low pressure warning level? Have you run a test to confirm the TPMS is working properly? Do you have other pictures of the failed tire?
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Old 11-26-2021, 07:35 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by CWtheMan View Post

Thanks, for the life of me I couldn't find that information. They sound much better than the previous F rated ones. I guess I'll report any problems, but for now, I'm planning on keeping them on.
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Old 11-27-2021, 11:09 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Mike&Sandy View Post
I'm picking up a 2022 Montana HC 295rl in 3 weeks. It's coming with Ranier G rated tires. Apparently, the G rated ones are new for 2022. Anybody want to chime in on if I should change them out?
Just replaced all 5 of our Rainier tires... After one blew and another had a tread separation. Less than 10k miles on them. Keep a close eye on them, and ditch them for something good first chance you get! It ripped a hole so the way through the bottom of our trailer!
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Old 11-28-2021, 04:20 PM   #28
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Just replaced all 5 of our Rainier tires... After one blew and another had a tread separation. Less than 10k miles on them. Keep a close eye on them, and ditch them for something good first chance you get! It ripped a hole so the way through the bottom of our trailer!

Did you file two complaints with NHTSA? One for each tire. You will need both VIN and the full DOT including the date part of the tire S/N.


The general failure of the RV community to take the 10 minutes required to file complaints is a major reason for us not getting the durability we want.
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Old 11-28-2021, 06:06 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by California camping View Post
Just replaced all 5 of our Rainier tires... After one blew and another had a tread separation. Less than 10k miles on them. Keep a close eye on them, and ditch them for something good first chance you get! It ripped a hole so the way through the bottom of our trailer!
Were they the G rated ones?
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Old 01-02-2022, 02:25 PM   #30
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Safe is better!

What brand of tires and when to change is always a fun subject because there are many opinions and facts seem obscured. I think to start with a statement that is true- manufacturers use cheap tires. Some people might have some good luck many do not. I have no experience with the Salin brand. I do have experience with Carlyle and Good Year. I have run Carlyle tires for years on many trailers and as long as I do the proper maintenance and inspections never had a problem. (I always do those things so never have had a problem). Good Year Endurance are one of the best trailer tires available but around $125-130/tire expensive. We bought a used Crossroads Sunset Trails 291RK with OEM supplied tires. They were in very good condition and the trailer had not been used much. DOT date was 2016 on all 5. I was going to replace anyway but had a blow out on homeward trip from Shenandoah last August. All I heard was "POP" then checked mirror and trailer had a little sway. Got off road to safe place and it had just popped. We were almost home and then I found out the tire cross wrench I brought would not fit the aluminum rims (OOPS! Forgot to check that). I ran home and got a deepwell socket and had it changed in less than 20 minutes. I had inspected all tires before trip and put 35 lbs in them all. Upon further inspection of the others I noticed small cracks starting to open in the sidewalls. So the camper got 5 new sneakers. I bought Carlyle and bumped up a load range- which I was going to do anyway. In future if I don't know a brand of tire I am not going to trust safety to it. I did have fun with the guys at the tire store when I took the wheels in for new sneakers. The steel belt was sticking out the blown one. "Can you guys patch this for me please?"
Jest kidden!
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Old 01-02-2022, 02:44 PM   #31
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I always recommend that a novice RV'er actually change a tire (from start to finish) in the driveway as part of the "driveway camping weekend" before ever hitching for that first camping weekend away from home.

By "from start to finish" what I mean is actually take the spare tire off the bumper or out from under the trailer, jack an axle, pull the tire off the axle, install the spare tire, let it down onto the ground, torque the lug nuts, then loosen the lugs, jack the axle, pull the spare tire, reinstall the road wheel/tire and remount the spare where it goes....

WHY ???? Glad you asked that... Often times, as Danimal posted, the tools you "think will work and are in your tool kit" don't work with aluminum wheels and far too often, the 7/8" or 13/16" lugs on the "ground wheel lugs" are not the same as the 5/8" nuts holding the spare tire to the spare mount.... Missing just one of those and you're stranded until you call for help....

Once you actually "perform the entire operation in the driveway" making those 2 or 3 or 17 trips to the tool chest in the garage to get what wasn't in the trailer, then take all of those tools and put them in your trailer so they are a "dedicated tire change kit" ....

Trust me when I say that I've seen more people "think they have what they need" and are stranded on the side of the road, in a rest area or in a campsite "wishing they had that one more tool"....

You may find, like I did on the first trailer that I had with aluminum wheels, that the lugs for the aluminum wheels are too short to tighten a steel wheel on the lugs, so you MIGHT need a set of open face lug nuts dedicated to the steel wheel spare, or possibly, swap the steel wheel for an aluminum spare so all the lug nuts fit any wheel on the trailer.... And the open face lug nuts will probably not use the same size socket as the closed face lug nuts for the aluminum wheels... So, tightening them onto the trailer axle may become an "experience" without the right tools and the only way to know you have it all is to "have done it and made sure".....

Don't forget the torque wrench, the extension so it will clear the tire and you can actually torque the lugs..... BTDT....
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Old 01-02-2022, 08:06 PM   #32
Tireman9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danimal713 View Post
What brand of tires and when to change is always a fun subject because there are many opinions and facts seem obscured. I think to start with a statement that is true- manufacturers use cheap tires. Some people might have some good luck many do not. I have no experience with the Salin brand. I do have experience with Carlyle and Good Year. I have run Carlyle tires for years on many trailers and as long as I do the proper maintenance and inspections never had a problem. (I always do those things so never have had a problem). Good Year Endurance are one of the best trailer tires available but around $125-130/tire expensive. We bought a used Crossroads Sunset Trails 291RK with OEM supplied tires. They were in very good condition and the trailer had not been used much. DOT date was 2016 on all 5. I was going to replace anyway but had a blow out on homeward trip from Shenandoah last August. All I heard was "POP" then checked mirror and trailer had a little sway. Got off road to safe place and it had just popped. We were almost home and then I found out the tire cross wrench I brought would not fit the aluminum rims (OOPS! Forgot to check that). I ran home and got a deepwell socket and had it changed in less than 20 minutes. I had inspected all tires before trip and put 35 lbs in them all. Upon further inspection of the others I noticed small cracks starting to open in the sidewalls. So the camper got 5 new sneakers. I bought Carlyle and bumped up a load range- which I was going to do anyway. In future if I don't know a brand of tire I am not going to trust safety to it. I did have fun with the guys at the tire store when I took the wheels in for new sneakers. The steel belt was sticking out the blown one. "Can you guys patch this for me please?"
Jest kidden!

If you only had 35 psi in your tires I'm surprisde they all did not fail. They would be grossly underinflated.
You need to review the MINIMUM tire and MINIMUM inflation recommended by your trailer MFG.


There is a Certification sticker on the outside, driver side, toward the front with that information. I bet all you looked at when it came to "inspection" was to see if you had tread pattern. I will PM you with a link to my RV Tire Safety info. Note I don't sell anything but offer my 40 years experience as a tire design engineer.
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Old 01-04-2022, 06:09 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
If you only had 35 psi in your tires I'm surprisde they all did not fail. They would be grossly underinflated.
You need to review the MINIMUM tire and MINIMUM inflation recommended by your trailer MFG.


There is a Certification sticker on the outside, driver side, toward the front with that information. I bet all you looked at when it came to "inspection" was to see if you had tread pattern. I will PM you with a link to my RV Tire Safety info. Note I don't sell anything but offer my 40 years experience as a tire design engineer.
I had a brainfart. Good catch . The trailer tires I had were 50 lbs not 35- 35 was the truck. The replacement tires are 65 lbs.
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Old 01-04-2022, 08:01 AM   #34
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I had a brainfart. Good catch . The trailer tires I had were 50 lbs not 35- 35 was the truck. The replacement tires are 65 lbs.
With 35 psi in the truck tires they are likely under inflated as well, especially when towing. If by chance you have P rated tires on your truck that only require 35 psi then they are not your best tire option for towing, LT tires would be a better option.
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Old 01-04-2022, 02:04 PM   #35
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With 35 psi in the truck tires they are likely under inflated as well, especially when towing. If by chance you have P rated tires on your truck that only require 35 psi then they are not your best tire option for towing, LT tires would be a better option.
I had those P rated car tires on a 2013 F150XL base model and a big ol' Lance truck camper in the bed. One look at the P rated car tires and I went out and bought some LRE LT tires without anyone giving me further tips or advice. I thought the car tires would pop. BTW: Payload was definitely exceeded.
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Old 01-04-2022, 02:19 PM   #36
Tireman9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
I always recommend that a novice RV'er actually change a tire (from start to finish) in the driveway as part of the "driveway camping weekend" before ever hitching for that first camping weekend away from home.

By "from start to finish" what I mean is actually take the spare tire off the bumper or out from under the trailer, jack an axle, pull the tire off the axle, install the spare tire, let it down onto the ground, torque the lug nuts, then loosen the lugs, jack the axle, pull the spare tire, reinstall the road wheel/tire and remount the spare where it goes....

WHY ???? Glad you asked that... Often times, as Danimal posted, the tools you "think will work and are in your tool kit" don't work with aluminum wheels and far too often, the 7/8" or 13/16" lugs on the "ground wheel lugs" are not the same as the 5/8" nuts holding the spare tire to the spare mount.... Missing just one of those and you're stranded until you call for help....

Once you actually "perform the entire operation in the driveway" making those 2 or 3 or 17 trips to the tool chest in the garage to get what wasn't in the trailer, then take all of those tools and put them in your trailer so they are a "dedicated tire change kit" ....

Trust me when I say that I've seen more people "think they have what they need" and are stranded on the side of the road, in a rest area or in a campsite "wishing they had that one more tool"....

You may find, like I did on the first trailer that I had with aluminum wheels, that the lugs for the aluminum wheels are too short to tighten a steel wheel on the lugs, so you MIGHT need a set of open face lug nuts dedicated to the steel wheel spare, or possibly, swap the steel wheel for an aluminum spare so all the lug nuts fit any wheel on the trailer.... And the open face lug nuts will probably not use the same size socket as the closed face lug nuts for the aluminum wheels... So, tightening them onto the trailer axle may become an "experience" without the right tools and the only way to know you have it all is to "have done it and made sure".....

Don't forget the torque wrench, the extension so it will clear the tire and you can actually torque the lugs..... BTDT....



That's an Excellent idea. One minor comment. I would only jack up and remove the tire with the TT hooked up to the TV as it would be on the road. This is a Safety measure as TT can move on the jack, I would also be sure to have a "pad" to go under the jack in case you have to stop with one side in the dirt. Pad can be 3/4" plywood or two layers of 1/2" plywood each 12" x 12"

Also after you change a tire the lug nuts need to be torqued in 50 Ft-Lb steps up to your speck. Then you need to stop at 50 miles and confirm the lug nuts are still tight. Your Owner's manual should have info and instructions on torquing the lug nuts as there is a pastern (sequence back and forth) and advice as how often to confirm the nuts are tight. It might say at 50 and 100 miles. I suggest each 50 miles till you have two checks with no movement of the lug nuts.
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Old 01-04-2022, 02:22 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by wiredgeorge View Post
I had those P rated car tires on a 2013 F150XL base model and a big ol' Lance truck camper in the bed. One look at the P rated car tires and I went out and bought some LRE LT tires without anyone giving me further tips or advice. I thought the car tires would pop. BTW: Payload was definitely exceeded.



Xl passenger tires would not have a 35 psi inflation level but probably in the 45 to 60 psi range.


Why would you pull with payload exceeding the spec maximum? On one hand you say you are concerned about your tires going "pop" then you intentionally overload them.
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