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Old 08-14-2020, 11:59 AM   #1
mjsibe
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Tires Again lol

I upgraded to Goodyear ENDURANCE
215- 75 x 14 load range D
From the stock 205 -75 x 14 load range c
It is a 2014 Passport ultralight 3100 Rk
Placard says 50 psi. (Max on the 205's)
The new replacements are max 65 psi.
Yes I did check the wheels for the higher psi.
Don't think I have to run max.Psi
Was thinking 55 or 60 psi
As I'm not going to overload it
I understand the tires have the load range
But not the Axels
Any suggestions?
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Old 08-14-2020, 12:46 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjsibe View Post
I upgraded to Goodyear ENDURANCE
215- 75 x 14 load range D
From the stock 205 -75 x 14 load range c
It is a 2014 Passport ultralight 3100 Rk
Placard says 50 psi. (Max on the 205's)
The new replacements are max 65 psi.
Yes I did check the wheels for the higher psi.
Don't think I have to run max.Psi
Was thinking 55 or 60 psi
As I'm not going to overload it
I understand the tires have the load range
But not the Axels
Any suggestions?
The ST205/75R14 provided your trailer with 1760# of load capacity at 50 PSI.

The ST215/75R14 will provide 2010# of load capacity at 55 PSI.

The ST205/75R14 LRD would have provided you with 2040# of load capacity at 65 PSI.

Why would you plus size your tires and not take advantage of the load capacity reserves the larger tire will provide?

Tires do not overload axles. Axles are overloaded by weight.
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:29 PM   #3
mjsibe
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Not what I was asking.
I understand you.
Tires will have less load then rated .
Running max 65 psi my wear the center of the tires
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:32 PM   #4
mjsibe
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the Goodyears are 2200 lb. Single @ 65 psi
I will never have them near the max


Travel Trailer is 7400 max load

3500 per axel
The truck carries some of the weight
Lol
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:38 PM   #5
QCMan
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Load vs inflation

Good move going to the Endurance tires. You will not be disappointed. Go to the GoodYear site for the Endurance tires and you will find a chart for inflation for your particular load.
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:43 PM   #6
mjsibe
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Thanks for the info.
I tow with a 2014 chevy express passenger
3500 van
As with everything I'm into overkill
Towing 7400 if im maxed
With 10k ability from the van
Safety factor is on my side.
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Old 08-14-2020, 03:12 PM   #7
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A couple things, put 65 PSI air pressure in D rated tires. The reason you bought D rated tires is for their safety margin. Also, go to USER CP on top left of each page and edit your signature to include your camper year, make and model and the same for your tow vehicle. This will make answering questions easier in the future. Thanks. wg
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Old 08-14-2020, 03:56 PM   #8
mjsibe
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Well
I didn't know about the profile thing
But did inform everyone about the make model & year
Of the TT.
Later included the tow vehicle .
In my 3500 express van I run lower tire pressure because I hardly ever get it maxed out with weight .
4k + payload
It's usually just me & the wife.
I dropped the pressure 10 lbs front & rear until I need to increase it.
Tire wear on last set was 55k miles
So I'm in the ballpark with guesstimating
Lol �� ��
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Old 08-14-2020, 04:56 PM   #9
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Personally Id run max cold inflation thats stamped on the tire provided the wheels are rated for it...running less psi is most likely just going t9 let those sidewalls flex more and build up heat... this in turn usually results in an unexpected tire failure down the road .....YMMV
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Old 08-14-2020, 09:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjsibe View Post
Not what I was asking.
I understand you.
Tires will have less load then rated .
Running max 65 psi my wear the center of the tires
Okay, use the load inflation chart in the reference below for your new designated tire size. To comply with tire industry safety standards you will have to use a cold inflation pressure that will provide, at the very minimum, 1760 pounds of load capacity in every tire.

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf
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Old 08-15-2020, 03:23 AM   #11
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All this concern over the air pressure.. Seems simple to me. On my truck I go by the tire inflation guide on the door placard when not towing. When towing, inflate the rear axle tires to max cold inflation on the tire which the oem rims can handle.

Trailer tires, always get max cold inflation as stamped into the tires (the poem rims are rated for it) for the following reasons.

1. I'm no tire installer but I've yet to see or hear of anyone "wearing out" a set of trailer tires as they typically "age out" before they wear out. What I've seen with uneven tread wear has been from alignment issues and not over inflation.
2. From what I've seen/read the majority of RVs are at near max weight or overweight. The "we pack light" typically goes with the "we don't go that far" and "I don't drive fast" excuses people use to justify towing a trailer that's too fat for the tow vehicle. These are the "ostrich RVers" that stick their head in the sand and never go to a scale to find the truth.

I guess there MAY BE someone out their that only camps at "clothing optional" campgrounds with an on-site restaurant". For the rest of us, by the time we add food and drinks, clothing, shoes, coats, raingear, kitchen supplies like cookware, a coffee maker, utensil, toaster, paper products, cleaning supplies, bathroom supplies, linen's and towels, hoses (fresh and drain), extensions, jack pads or cribbing, wheel chocks, tools, etc.,etc. The weight will be MUCH closer to the max than it is to the min.
JMHO YMMV
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Old 08-15-2020, 04:30 AM   #12
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Quote:
All this concern over the air pressure.. Seems simple to me. On my truck I go by the tire inflation guide on the door placard when not towing. When towing, inflate the rear axle tires to max cold inflation on the tire which the oem rims can handle.

Trailer tires, always get max cold inflation as stamped into the tires (the poem rims are rated for it) for the following reasons.
Yup I do exactly the same and have for decades.. I air up the rear tires to max 80 psi.. fronts at 70... fifth wheel between 105 to 110... After arriving at destination I let truck tires cool off and let air back out to 55 rear 65 front.. I air them back up the day we are heading back out

The RV tires are on their 5th season now.. 14 ply and they sure as heck arent wearing in the middle due to over inflation...
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Old 08-15-2020, 05:28 AM   #13
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Simple math, for a travel trailer I use 13% for tongue weight (between the 10%-15% range). So, for every 1,000 lbs of payload there will be a 130 lbs increase in hitch weight. The remaining 870 lbs would be distributed among the 4 tires (assuming dual axle) for an increase load of 207.5 lbs/tire. Would you adjust the air pressure for that? This ain't a NASCAR race.

A fiver, using 20% pin weight for an increase of 1,000 lb. Load would result in +200 pin and 200/tire on dual axles.

In my thinking I'd rather err on a little higher psi as opposed to risking running under inflated.
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Old 08-15-2020, 05:36 AM   #14
mjsibe
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THANKS EVERYONE
CWtheman
Excellent chart.
any tire can be run at max pressure .
But if you look @max on car tires most run lower pressure as the factory recommends.
Wife's car max is 44 psi
Yet door sticker says 32 psi.
Again
Thanks for all of your responses
Cheers & Happy Camping
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Old 08-15-2020, 06:06 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by mjsibe View Post
THANKS EVERYONE
CWtheman
Excellent chart.
any tire can be run at max pressure .
But if you look @max on car tires most run lower pressure as the factory recommends.
Wife's car max is 44 psi
Yet door sticker says 32 psi.
Again
Thanks for all of your responses
Cheers & Happy Camping
Your trailer has an inflation sticker as well. Here's what I don't understand though, if you are only going to inflate the trailer tires to that chart (which is a minimum recommendation) then why go up one rating? It's the air in the tire that supports the weight so if you run the air pressure at the lower rating you've gained nothing in capacity or reserve.

Passenger car tires are inflated to minimum weight capacity to "soften the ride". I'll guarantee your wife's car tires are supporting much less than 1,000 lbs/tire. It's your decision do as you wish.
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Old 08-15-2020, 06:06 AM   #16
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The concern when you up the tires to a higher rating is: Are the wheels rated for the higher rating?


this usually is more of a concern when one goes from 'E' rated to 'G' rated.


The axles have nothing to do with what you are doing. Also, tires are now rated by letters and not by the number of plys.
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Old 08-15-2020, 06:25 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjsibe View Post
Not what I was asking.
I understand you.
Tires will have less load then rated .
Running max 65 psi my wear the center of the tires
With the exception of a mechanical issue (axle alignment, bent spindle, warped bearings, defective wheel or a bad tire) I've never seen a ST tire on a travel trailer "wear out in the center tread" before it "ages out at 5 years from DOM"...

While there may be some people who tow their trailer 30K or more in less than 5 years, most people average around 5K or less annually, so ST tires simply don't "wear out" before they "age out"....

Essentially, by reducing the tire pressure (to save the tread) also reduces the load capacity, which is the reason for buying larger tires with increased capacity....

It's antithetical to replace tires with a 1710 pound load rating with tires that have a 2010 pound load rating, then reduce the pressure in those tires (to keep the tread flat on the road surface) which also reduces the load capacity to 1710 pounds.... You've gained nothing but spent more for the same load capacity....

I'd go a bit further and suggest that you may have decreased your "overall protection" since the heavier tires have thicker sidewalls and will flex more, creating increased heat in the tire carcass, which may even reduce your overall long term reliability.

To me, buying larger tires for increased capacity and then airing them down to decrease their capacity is similar to buying a "large economy box of cereal, then throwing half of it away because you couldn't eat it all before it spoiled.....
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Old 08-15-2020, 08:50 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
With the exception of a mechanical issue (axle alignment, bent spindle, warped bearings, defective wheel or a bad tire) I've never seen a ST tire on a travel trailer "wear out in the center tread" before it "ages out at 5 years from DOM"...

While there may be some people who tow their trailer 30K or more in less than 5 years, most people average around 5K or less annually, so ST tires simply don't "wear out" before they "age out"....

Essentially, by reducing the tire pressure (to save the tread) also reduces the load capacity, which is the reason for buying larger tires with increased capacity....

It's antithetical to replace tires with a 1710 pound load rating with tires that have a 2010 pound load rating, then reduce the pressure in those tires (to keep the tread flat on the road surface) which also reduces the load capacity to 1710 pounds.... You've gained nothing but spent more for the same load capacity....

I'd go a bit further and suggest that you may have decreased your "overall protection" since the heavier tires have thicker sidewalls and will flex more, creating increased heat in the tire carcass, which may even reduce your overall long term reliability.

To me, buying larger tires for increased capacity and then airing them down to decrease their capacity is similar to buying a "large economy box of cereal, then throwing half of it away because you couldn't eat it all before it spoiled.....
Well said John!
I too thought that a bit silly to buy more tire then under inflate it. I ran mine at the max cold printed on the tire. I seriously doubt that the ride in the trailer would be affected a 5-10 increase, or decrease, in tire pressure.
You might notice that pressure difference in the wives car/SUV, but that's also doubtful. I run the pressure in my vehicles at the cold max also, it improves tire wear & fuel mileage in my opinion.
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Old 08-15-2020, 09:12 AM   #19
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All of our highway tires are designed for the vehicles they will be used on. Passenger (P) and light truck (LT) are designed to be used on vehicles with steer and traction capabilities. They are tested and certified for those positions. Does that make them better suited for service on RV trailers? That’s a vehicle manufacturer’s decision to make.

Special trailer (ST) tires are designed as follower tires with better ability to withstand sidewall stresses.

Here’s the kicker that most confuses consumers. Although all of the above are certified highway tires, the regulations and standards are much different, especially when it comes to inflation pressures. Automotive tires MUST and always have been required to provide a percentage of load capacity reserves via inflation pressures. RV trailer tires have always been required to only provide a maximum load capacity to support the vehicles certified GAWRs. I’ve attended at least two major RV shows for the past 15 years and have never seen a vehicle certification label with recommended cold inflation pressures less than tire sidewall max. Trailer manufacturers will use whatever tires are available that will allow them to pass DOT vehicle certifications which require minimum standards to be met. I have a photo of a vehicle certification label where the vehicle manufacturer set the trailer’s GAWRs to 5080# so ST225/75R15 LRD tires could be used. I also have a couple of label pictures that have 6850# vehicle certified axles for the purpose of using tires with 3420# maximum load capacities.

Tires fitted to automotive vehicles always have a very substantial load capacity reserve and are never fitted to carry the maximum load of the vehicle.

We often see complaints about ST tires not being tested to the same standards the P & LT tires are tested to. Why should they? They are never required to perform steer of traction functions. They are tested for what they are, trailer tires.

A very high percentage of ST tire manufacturers will recommend the tires they build for trailers be inflated to sidewall max. I’m not sure if they had in mind the huge overkill (G for an E) going on with many of their tires, especially where there may already be providing 10% in load capacity reserves. It’s been my observation that when one of those all steel bricks fails, its going to take out a substantial section of a wheel well and surrounding structures.

My recommendations; always use placard inflation pressures for Original Equipment Tires. Always provide at least 15% in load capacity reserves for replacement tires.


Just a note: Tire manufacturers build tires to satisfy the needs of the vehicle industries. They have no authority to set or recommend tire inflation pressures (below vehicle manufacturer recommended cold inflation pressures). They just provide charts that allow installers to make wise choices for setting inflation pressures for OE & replacement tires. The selection and fitment of those tires to a vehicle is the sole responsibility of the vehicle manufacturer.
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Old 08-15-2020, 10:34 AM   #20
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My apologies to the OP. I should have never said to follow the manufacturers instructions.
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