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Old 01-09-2020, 08:28 AM   #41
goodellj
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I agree with almost everything said here about making a maximum effort to maintain your tires properly and also that China is not to blame for tire failures. I have 4-year-old G-rated Gladiators that have been great and it turns out they were made in China!
BUT.... They replaced the E-rated tires that came on my 5th wheel. I struggled with tires and these were my third replacement set! The previous tires were all E-rated, like the trailer came with, and I guess they were just too light for the trailer and the miles I was doing. Someone finally advised me that a heavier rated tire would be more appropriate and they were right. My trailer was close to maximum weight fully loaded and supposedly still within spec for the tires, but I guess too close and not enough 'reserve' weight capacity.
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Old 01-09-2020, 08:45 AM   #42
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I have the china bombs on my 2017 Cougar xlt 28RKS 5th. I repack the bearings and check the brakes yearly. I ALWAYS check my tire pressure and ALWAYS use tire covers to protect them from the sun. Also, I keep my speed at 65. I have over 15,000 miles on them and have had no problems. That said I'll replace them at the end of this season (4th).
I guess that makes me one of the lucky ones ��
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Old 01-09-2020, 08:54 AM   #43
rdemore
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We have a sprinter camper, we bought new in 2017. The date code of the Trailer King tires was 1416. We pulled 2000 miles round trip over New Years and had three flats / blowouts. We replaced one at at time with Goodyear Endurance. After the last blow out I replaced the last remaining two tires. I am not sure what happened to me, but the Endurance tires seem better. Changing at tire on the side of I-75 is not fun.

I am not sure why it happened but I do not think it was a coincidence I lost three tires so quickly
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:11 AM   #44
CWtheMan
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Originally Posted by sourdough View Post
Personally I'll never own another Trailer King tire. In your case with a new trailer, I think I would run the 1st year and replace them. Mine blew out on the first trip of the 2nd season. Also remember that those things destroy themselves from the inside out. One of our members took his off and the inside of the tires were bulged and separating while the exterior looked great.

I will add that there have been changes in the guidelines for tire load ranges since I bought mine so you might check. Note the gvw of the trailer, size/weight range of the tire and the max load the tire can carry. Some deduct the tongue weight when calculating what weight the tire will bear. I don't agree with that premise. As a very basic calculation just divide the gvw by 4 (tandem axle) and see what that load is. Compare to the load rating on the tire and give yourself at least a 10% cushion. Scientific and mega accurate? No. Will it get you in the ballpark instead of just putting "something" on because that's what came on the trailer? Yes it will. JMO
Just a reference: https://www.tirebusiness.com/article...t-trailer-tire - Sailun is the builder of Trailer King tires.

The problem in the orange is; trailer manufacturers fit tire/wheel assemblies to the vehicle certified GAWRs on the vehicle certification label. The rule does not require any load capacity reserves (a big problem in the past that I'm sure caused many good tires to fail early). A recommendation from RVIA has caused trailer manufacturer to add at the very least, 10% in load capacity reserves above GAWR. So, any trailer made after late 2015 models will have that protection. However, your method is above and beyond the standards but may cause replacement tires to have more load capacity that could cause the need for new wheels.

RV trailer manufacturers set the vehicle certified GAWRs. Some will differ from the axle manufacturers certified value. From the computer model the vehicle manufacturer deducts the trailer's projected recommended tongue weight from the projected GVWR and divides by the number of axle positions to set GAWRs. They do not want to invite overloading so the GAWRs are almost set very close to, or right on minimum.
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:14 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by rdemore View Post
We have a sprinter camper, we bought new in 2017. The date code of the Trailer King tires was 1416. We pulled 2000 miles round trip over New Years and had three flats / blowouts. We replaced one at at time with Goodyear Endurance. After the last blow out I replaced the last remaining two tires. I am not sure what happened to me, but the Endurance tires seem better. Changing at tire on the side of I-75 is not fun.

I am not sure why it happened but I do not think it was a coincidence I lost three tires so quickly
Sorry to hear of your unusual tire failure problem. Without validation of the cause of the failure there are no facts to comment on.
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:16 AM   #46
pdaniel
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I had a 2017 Cougar with that tire brand. I kept the inflation pressures at recommended pressure and did not overload the trailer. I always kept my speeds resonable-around 65MPH and never had an issue in towing that trailer about 10000 miles when I owned it.

The key is inflation, load and speed.
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:22 AM   #47
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I the past I have performed quality assurance auditing on a tire recapping facility. So, I have had some involvement in DOT approval of the tires.
Every tire whether manufactured or recapped domestically or off-shore needs to pass DOT testing for that type of tire. Period. Chinese tires are included. Those tests include maximum recommended load, speed and inflation and are subject to a multitude of tests including extremes of speed, heat, and load.
What is not tested is we RV owners and the constant overloading of our rigs and high rates of speed.
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:28 AM   #48
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Something I've commented on several times and will again:

You really have no idea what "care/use/misuse" your OEM tires had prior to the time you took delivery of your trailer. It could have been towed from the Oregon or Indiana factory on tires with 20PSI at 80MPH, sat on the dealers lot with a flat tire, moved from one location on the sales lot to another multiple times with that same tire pressure, maybe even for the entire year + that it sat at the dealership before you bought it and the service department aired up the tires for delivery....

This is just one example of "completely misused and abused tires" for which, as the owner, you have no idea of the history involved. OEM tires "should be a better fit with improved load safety margins" now that the new standards are being followed, but they still don't provide for misuse/mishandling that might have happened before you ever looked at the trailer.....

The only way to "know for sure" that YOUR current tires have never been abused is to start with a "known good set of tires"...

Before the arguments start, I know that "the dealer is responsible for....." and "Keystone should..." My point is "Do you know that occurred, not that it "SHOULD" have occurred?"
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:41 AM   #49
sourdough
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Originally Posted by CWtheMan View Post
Just a reference: https://www.tirebusiness.com/article...t-trailer-tire - Sailun is the builder of Trailer King tires.

The problem in the orange is; trailer manufacturers fit tire/wheel assemblies to the vehicle certified GAWRs on the vehicle certification label. The rule does not require any load capacity reserves (a big problem in the past that I'm sure caused many good tires to fail early). A recommendation from RVIA has caused trailer manufacturer to add at the very least, 10% in load capacity reserves above GAWR. So, any trailer made after late 2015 models will have that protection. However, your method is above and beyond the standards but may cause replacement tires to have more load capacity that could cause the need for new wheels.

RV trailer manufacturers set the vehicle certified GAWRs. Some will differ from the axle manufacturers certified value. From the computer model the vehicle manufacturer deducts the trailer's projected recommended tongue weight from the projected GVWR and divides by the number of axle positions to set GAWRs. They do not want to invite overloading so the GAWRs are almost set very close to, or right on minimum.

Yes, my method for deciding the load range could impact the wheel. If one is going to do that it is mandatory to know what the specs of the wheel are.

GAWR could come into play if you tried to load to the tire capability and disregarded the gawr but that isn't the purpose, for me, to upgrade the LRE. It's to give me as much cushion as possible in an effort to prevent a tire failure from ???

I do believe that raising the minimum cushion to 10% is going to help and is a contributor to many of the failures in the past. However, that does not mean, to me, that is the sole reason for repeated Trailer King failures.

The article you attached via the link was from April of last year (2019) and they indicate that the tire was a "new" tire...whatever that may be. It also notes it is produced by the Sailun Jinyu Group. I'm hoping that is not going to be the same Yonsheng plant that the other Trailer Kings came from. If it isn't, that may bode very well for the Trailer King brand. I don't know how they could not be aware of the dismal perception the brand has. Time will tell....and I'll try to look into it when I have time.....or you may have some sort of document that would tell us if the plant is in fact different.
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:44 AM   #50
RangerFred
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I bought a 2011 Bullet from a coworker. The trailer itself was in unbelievably perfect condition. The tires had no wear that I could determine and looked great too (Armor all can mask things). On our first trip, I blew the first tire about 25 minutes away from home. Replaced with the spare. The second tire on the same side blew an hour later, forcing me to unhook and drive 30 minutes to get a replacement. When I got to the campground, the next day, I replaced the 2 on the other side just to be safe. The tires that shredded were Goodyear Marathons, load rating "C."

I did some research and saw that Bullet put Load rated "D" tires on similarly sized new trailers. Hmmmmm I said to myself, and replaced all 5 tires with Load Rated "D" Goodyear Endurance.

Here's what I have learned:
- If I ever buy another used trailer, I will replace the tires ASAP--no question.
- Unlike the previous owner, the tires are on PT wood, not the ground.
- Unlike the previous owner, All 5 tires are covered, not exposed to the sun & elements.
- The 2 ton jack provided was insufficient. The 3 ton I replaced it with works fine.
- Repair of the underside and the shroud cost almost as much as 5 new tires. I'm fortunate that I could do all repairs myself, except for painting of the shroud ($312)
- I will treat the tires as the most important part of the trailer, along with the bearings, brakes and hitch.
- I will investigate and install a TPMS (Assuming I can afford it.)

Recommendations on the TPMS are welcome. And.....I don't blame my co-worker a bit.
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Old 01-09-2020, 09:48 AM   #51
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Wow, I'm glad someone finally got around to starting a thread about tires! (said with sarcasm) I was starting to get bored .
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Old 01-09-2020, 10:12 AM   #52
Tireman9
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Originally Posted by Kylemcmahon1 View Post
Yes they were the same size load rating and all. Like I said this is my opinion all from my experience you can do what you wish and I did agree with part of what you said. No need to be rude and disrespect my opinion.



You did leave off the comparison of cost in your original post.


Given that most folks shop on price a failure to compare tires of equal price is not a reasonable comparison.
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Old 01-09-2020, 10:15 AM   #53
owen4it
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The "China Bomb" crap is just that, crap.

Fact: Most trailer tire failures are China made tires.
Reason; Most trailer tires are made in China.

If most trailers used USA made tires, guess what, most tire failures would be USA made tires.

Keep them inflated, don't hit curbs, don't overload them and all should be well.

http://www.rvtiresafety.net/2019/02/...omb-tires.html
I would agree only from personal experience. I pot on over 20,000 miles on my new camper towing to Alaska and out west then home again. Checking tire pressure, keeping with in the speed marked on the tires and within five years is the key!
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Old 01-09-2020, 10:16 AM   #54
Tireman9
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Originally Posted by RangerFred View Post
I bought a 2011 Bullet from a coworker. The trailer itself was in unbelievably perfect condition. The tires had no wear that I could determine and looked great too (Armor all can mask things). On our first trip, I blew the first tire about 25 minutes away from home. Replaced with the spare. The second tire on the same side blew an hour later, forcing me to unhook and drive 30 minutes to get a replacement. When I got to the campground, the next day, I replaced the 2 on the other side just to be safe. The tires that shredded were Goodyear Marathons, load rating "C."

I did some research and saw that Bullet put Load rated "D" tires on similarly sized new trailers. Hmmmmm I said to myself, and replaced all 5 tires with Load Rated "D" Goodyear Endurance.

Here's what I have learned:
- If I ever buy another used trailer, I will replace the tires ASAP--no question.
- Unlike the previous owner, the tires are on PT wood, not the ground.
- Unlike the previous owner, All 5 tires are covered, not exposed to the sun & elements.
- The 2 ton jack provided was insufficient. The 3 ton I replaced it with works fine.
- Repair of the underside and the shroud cost almost as much as 5 new tires. I'm fortunate that I could do all repairs myself, except for painting of the shroud ($312)
- I will treat the tires as the most important part of the trailer, along with the bearings, brakes and hitch.
- I will investigate and install a TPMS (Assuming I can afford it.)

Recommendations on the TPMS are welcome. And.....I don't blame my co-worker a bit.

Given that a single warning of low niflation from the TPMS could save you many times the cost of the system I don't see how you can afford to not get a TPMS. Depending on the system you may be looking at $5 bucks a year for batteries and you can always take the system with you when you get a new RV.


I bought a Tire Traker TT500 with Lifetime warranty. Easily programed and have used Traker Tpms since 2009
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Old 01-09-2020, 10:27 AM   #55
RangerFred
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Thanks for the recommendation. I can afford that! With a child with her eyes on Veterinary School, I am trying to be frugal.

Thanks again!
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Old 01-09-2020, 10:34 AM   #56
rdemore
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Thanks, and we have new tires now. I have TPMS sensors on tires and it notified me as I pulled to the shoulder. I do not drive fast, and heavier trailers pass us on a regular basis. I hope the Endurance tires solve our problems for a while
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Old 01-09-2020, 12:55 PM   #57
crk112
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Our TT came with Karrier Load Stars. I replaced them because their combined load rating was not adequate for the gross weight of the trailer, depending on tongue weight.

I replaced them with Goodyear Endurance at the higher load rating. The ride is nicer and I’m not limited to 65mph, which is good because in 4th gear I’m behind the power curve (for my trailer anyway) til closer to 70.


Secondary reason was that I wanted tires made in the USA.
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Old 01-09-2020, 01:35 PM   #58
rdemore
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Thanks, my truck likes to run between 65 and 70, and I too see that as an advantage to the Endurance tires. I have 4 new ones now, and am ready to see how they do.
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Old 01-09-2020, 01:40 PM   #59
rdemore
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You are right, but it is an easy topic, and when you have your back to traffic on the interstate, it is an emotional one as well. It is disappointing to me that OEM’s are not more proactive on this topic. I remember 20 years ago when there were issues with car tires and it was fixed. Thanks for your patience
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Old 01-09-2020, 02:05 PM   #60
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Good idea! I had Power Kings. lasted 6 years with no problems, had only about 4,000 miles so tires sat for long periods which does not help. Reason I think tries gave me no problem is my trailer was at the bottom for weight for the larger models that used the same tire. They were D rated tires and at scale weight of my trailer I had a lot of extra room for the rated weight rate of the tires. Changed to Goodyear Endurance E rating and have been quite happy, took a load of worry of my shoulders! I trust these tires!
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