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Old 10-03-2019, 03:12 PM   #41
Inspector128
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Slow Learner

Alright, after two years of being a forum member, this is my first post. When I saw the tire topic, I felt it was time to tell my story. We bought a used 2011 Keystone Copper Canyon (our first) in 2017 from the original owner. Less than a thousand miles on the original tires-no wear, no cracks-they got to be good for one more year? Right???

Date coded from 2010, so that put them at 7 years of age. When you see the attached photos, you'll realize we didn't make it from WI to AZ. I know, I was reading the posts, trying to learn all I could about our 5th wheel. But gosh, I could save $400.00 by getting by another year. Wrong.

Let's see, blew out the propane lines, electric brakes, exterior and undercarriage damage. Boy did I save some money! Took care of the repairs myself-good way to learn the lesson.

Anyway, thanks to you all, this is a great forum and a great teaching tool (when the student wants to learn).
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Old 10-03-2019, 05:14 PM   #42
rcashdollar
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Tires

Okay, you all scared me enough to replace my recently purchased 2014 TT tires, which by the way look to be in great condition. Is it a good idea to go from load range D to E?
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Old 10-03-2019, 07:01 PM   #43
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Agreed but after the success he had with the Corvair he may just get all RVs pulled off the road and then where would we be?
Camping in tents,,,,,, oh no
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Old 10-03-2019, 07:25 PM   #44
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E's will be a better all around tire. I remember replacing all my OEM's on the ole 2010 291KSSR Springdale with E range tires....ride was way better and more stable.Click image for larger version

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Old 10-03-2019, 11:04 PM   #45
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I must have the biggest horseshoe you know where. I replaced my original tires last spring, so 8 years and the only issue I had was the valves leaked badly year 1.

They needed replacing this year, but yeah. 8 years on towkings.

Bumped up to load range E and 75mph rating. so I should be good for 10 yrs this time (kidding).
The leaking valves possibly because you had external sensors for tmps. Then metal valves or HP rubber snapp in valves are needed to prevent them from bending by centrifugal forces.

So check that ( if ex sensors) with the new tires, or you will get the same problem soon.
Push the valve-end gently sideward, if it bends, it a normal snapp in valve of thr TR 400 series( maxcold 65 to 70 psi) if not the TR600HP series, made to hold in cold pressure of 95 psi( discussion 80 psi ) . Dont assume they used that because E- load, yust check it. And a metal valve can be recocnised because it looks like metal.
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:35 AM   #46
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I had a too similar story...We went to Michigan last year with our Raptor and at a fuel stop noticed a cracked wheel on one of our aluminum wheels. Hair line crack at the base of one of the "spokes" so after much calling round found a truck repair shop that would change to our unused spare wheel tire. They did so and we almost made it home when the tire literally blew apart wrapping itself around the axle tearing away the under body coverings and insulation and ripping the side body apart. I remember thinking it would be smart to swap the cracked wheel tire (new) with the spare but the tech thought our unused spare would be fine. It had never seen daylight but was ten years old. I've learned that today's tires are designed to come apart after ten years no matter if used on the road or not----------deregulation sure has reaped rewards---for everyone except consumers! I remember tires lasting decades not all that long ago.........
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Old 10-04-2019, 01:23 AM   #47
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I had a too similar story...We went to Michigan last year with our Raptor and at a fuel stop noticed a cracked wheel on one of our aluminum wheels. Hair line crack at the base of one of the "spokes" so after much calling round found a truck repair shop that would change to our unused spare wheel tire. They did so and we almost made it home when the tire literally blew apart wrapping itself around the axle tearing away the under body coverings and insulation and ripping the side body apart. I remember thinking it would be smart to swap the cracked wheel tire (new) with the spare but the tech thought our unused spare would be fine. It had never seen daylight but was ten years old. I've learned that today's tires are designed to come apart after ten years no matter if used on the road or not----------deregulation sure has reaped rewards---for everyone except consumers! I remember tires lasting decades not all that long ago.........
Age is a bigger factor than mileage as you learned. But use is as large a factor as age. Tires are designed with lubricant in the rubber that is released when they are in use. When a tire sits it dries out and gets dry rot. So a bigger factor is how often the tire is run. If it sets all year and then goes on a trip for two weeks in the summer, that tire is good for maybe 3 years at the most. If you're out there full timing it you could get 10. I had two blowouts in one trip one year and that was on 5 year old tires but the rig had sat in one place for about 9 months prior to that trip. We are half timers and I now go by the 5-7 years rule.
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Old 10-04-2019, 02:24 AM   #48
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Agreed but after the success he had with the Corvair he may just get all RVs pulled off the road and then where would we be?
I remember when he "busted" the Ma Bell monopoly. That debacle ended up with different companies for local, long distance, maintenance etc. You had to dial more numbers than a bookie dealt with to make a long distance call. The phone bill costs doubled and the phone bill looked like an NFL playbook.
Nader? No thank you.
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Old 10-04-2019, 05:56 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Inspector128 View Post
Alright, after two years of being a forum member, this is my first post. When I saw the tire topic, I felt it was time to tell my story. We bought a used 2011 Keystone Copper Canyon (our first) in 2017 from the original owner. Less than a thousand miles on the original tires-no wear, no cracks-they got to be good for one more year? Right???

Date coded from 2010, so that put them at 7 years of age. When you see the attached photos, you'll realize we didn't make it from WI to AZ. I know, I was reading the posts, trying to learn all I could about our 5th wheel. But gosh, I could save $400.00 by getting by another year. Wrong.

Let's see, blew out the propane lines, electric brakes, exterior and undercarriage damage. Boy did I save some money! Took care of the repairs myself-good way to learn the lesson.

Anyway, thanks to you all, this is a great forum and a great teaching tool (when the student wants to learn).
Holy Moly!
I thought my damage was bad. I didn't have propane line and electric brake damage.
Sorry to hear your story. Lots of repair needed.
I was able to continue my journey after my blowouts and getting my 5 new tires. I now feel lucky I didn't sustain even more damage.
I constantly think "What would have happened if the second tire on the same side also blew right after the first one?" WOULD THE TRAILER TIP OVER???
Has anyone experienced that?

And Yes, this is a great forum.
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:13 AM   #50
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Okay, you all scared me enough to replace my recently purchased 2014 TT tires, which by the way look to be in great condition. Is it a good idea to go from load range D to E?
I don't know what trailer you have or the limitations of your wheels (look on the backside for either a psi or weight rating stamped on them - it will tell you if they will take the pressure of the E rated tire. If they will, I would upgrade just because. I did and have been extremely happy with the upgrade. Plus, if it is a 2014 with OEM tires they need to come off "yesterday".
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:45 AM   #51
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OK Im convinced. My 2017 21 RBS came with



Westlake. Actually seems like a pretty stout tire, 15 load range E, for the size and weight of the trailer.



But at the end of the day, they are made in China, next year would be the 4th season on them, low miles but so what. Just not worth the risk. Have seen several youtube vids of people comparing the exact size Westlake to the Goodyear Endurance. Wont do anything till spring, my season is over, but looks like that is the way I will go in the spring, along with some metal valve stems and perhaps a TPMS.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:47 AM   #52
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The leaking valves possibly because you had external sensors for tmps. Then metal valves or HP rubber snapp in valves are needed to prevent them from bending by centrifugal forces.
Nope. No TPMS. Just crap valves that wouldn't hold air. Once replaced I had no issues in the next 7 or so years.
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Old 10-04-2019, 11:33 AM   #53
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Nope. No TPMS. Just crap valves that wouldn't hold air. Once replaced I had no issues in the next 7 or so years.
Not saying this was your problem. I have used one of these for years and periodically tighten the valve itself into the stem. Can't tell you how many vehicles I have owned including RVs that had poorly seated valves.
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:57 AM   #54
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The simple solution to address the issue of massive damage from tire blowouts is for the factory to install steel or heavy gauge aluminum wheel wells which would protect the body, the propane lines and electrical wiring. It's beyond ridiculous that DOT and NHSTA allow this crap to roll down the road as is.

As I covered in my RV Tire blog
"Sorry, but IMO trying to "build a shield" just is not a reasonable approach. I doubt that you can spare the 500 or more pounds of steel it would take for the shield and structure to support the shield. Since a failure of a tire can be explosive event a solid wall will not let the force dissipate. You need an open grate. Check out this compilation of exploding tires to see the forces involved. Note that most of these did not involve a tire spinning at 50 to 65 mph which would add significant force to any explosion."


Also there is cost($30 per sq ft) plus the cost and weight to build a support strong enough to prevent the exploding tire from punching through the RV floor and to suppost the weight of the grate as you bounce down the road.



You can see what tire companies have developed to accomplish what you are asking.
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Old 10-06-2019, 02:24 AM   #55
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Nope. No TPMS. Just crap valves that wouldn't hold air. Once replaced I had no issues in the next 7 or so years.
Then still usefull to check the new valves, if the are sutable for the E-load.
Push sideward GENTLY.
If a normal valve of the TR400 series, not an urgent matter, they have test-standards, mildest american standard is that they have to stand a 26 psi higher pressure constant, this for pressure buildup bij higher inside tire temp.

And you probably dont need the full 80 psi, if you game from D-load AT 65 psi.

Still I would demand the HP at least for AT 80 psi tires.
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Old 10-10-2019, 07:34 AM   #56
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Phil, there are those who will follow your advice, and then there are those who will post these same stories as yours down the road. I also might change that time period to reflect more along the lines of three-four years unless the brand has the word 'King' in it. Then we swap to the word 'immediately!'
Ahh, boogers. My rig came off the lot with "Trailer Kings." I'm all the way on the wrong side of the country, and now I have one more thing to worry about.
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Old 10-10-2019, 04:18 PM   #57
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I did something similar; went from a ST205/75/14 LRC tire to a ST225/75/15 LRE. Everything the frame rails has been changed out for something bigger and more robust (springs, axles, hangers, tires, and wheels). Failures with any of these components can be vacation ending when your 2500 miles away from home. I worry less now on the road.
In tire industry lingo, that's "plus sizing". It invalidates the inflation pressures in the vehicle owner manual, tire placard and what's on the vehicle certification label. Did you set a new recommended cold inflation pressure for the replacement tires? It's a necessary step for vehicle safety reasons.
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Old 10-10-2019, 04:28 PM   #58
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Ahh, boogers. My rig came off the lot with "Trailer Kings." I'm all the way on the wrong side of the country, and now I have one more thing to worry about.
Your trailer is in the new era of load capacity reserves for RV trailer tires. You have 4400# axles with tires providing 5660# of load capacity for each axle.

http://trailerkingtires.com/content/...rranty0817.pdf
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Old 10-10-2019, 05:21 PM   #59
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Your trailer is in the new era of load capacity reserves for RV trailer tires. You have 4400# axles with tires providing 5660# of load capacity for each axle.



http://trailerkingtires.com/content/...rranty0817.pdf


I have no idea what the implications of this are. It sounds like you're saying that the axles and not the tires are my weak point in terms of load rating, but I don't understand how that does or doesn't reflect on that particular brand of tire having a reputation of being defective "China bombs."
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Old 10-10-2019, 09:40 PM   #60
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I have no idea what the implications of this are. It sounds like you're saying that the axles and not the tires are my weak point in terms of load rating, but I don't understand how that does or doesn't reflect on that particular brand of tire having a reputation of being defective "China bombs."
Users are not equal. In the past, your OEM tires have been installed on trailers with very little load capacity reserves. Many of the complaining consumers did not know their tires were being abused and when they failed early "it just had to be bad tires". ST tires today, are not the ST tires they were 5 years ago.

I gave you a warranty reference for those tires. Did you read it? It's not just a warranty. It contains information on the care and maintenance of those tires.

All tires on RV trailers are required to carry the maximum load of the vehicle certified axles. Load capacity reserves are derived from the difference between the tire maximum load and the axles maximum load. Axles do not degrade anywhere near as fast as tires. Tires on RV trailers degrade quite rapidly, especially when misused and/or not properly maintained.

You really don't want the tires to be the weakest link. They blow and make a mess of your trailer's wheel wells and those sacrificial fenders.
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