RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 

Go Back   Keystone RV Forums > Keystone Fleet | Keystone RV Models > Travel Trailers
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-21-2019, 06:04 AM   #21
flybouy
Site Team
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Joppa, MD
Posts: 5,409
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacherman View Post
I have a question. Are these GFIs the same as ones used in house wiring? If so, replacement would be cheap enough. I know they come in both 15 and 20 amp. Is the wiring 12 or 14 ga? I wonder about this, given the need to make a trailer at a certain price point, and the creativity often shown in pursuit of same...
If the current GFI is 15 amp then it's 99.9% certain it will be 14 ga wire.
__________________

__________________
Marshall
2012 Laredo 303 TG
2010 F250 LT Super Cab, long bed, 4X4, 6.4 Turbo Diesel
flybouy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2019, 06:11 AM   #22
JRTJH
Site Team
 
JRTJH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Gaylord
Posts: 19,602
Quote:
Originally Posted by teacherman View Post
I have a question. Are these GFIs the same as ones used in house wiring? If so, replacement would be cheap enough. I know they come in both 15 and 20 amp. Is the wiring 12 or 14 ga? I wonder about this, given the need to make a trailer at a certain price point, and the creativity often shown in pursuit of same...
To answer your question about the ROMEX gauge, 15 amp circuits use 14 ga ROMEX and 20 amp circuits use 12 ga ROMEX. Go to the circuit breaker panel, determine what size circuit breaker is in the circuit, use ROMEX of that appropriate size.

As a warning: Using 14 ga ROMEX in a 20 amp circuit "could cause a fire hazard" as the wiring may get too hot before the circuit breaker opens.
__________________

__________________
John



2015 F250 6.7l 4x4
2014 Cougar X Lite 27RKS
JRTJH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2019, 07:04 AM   #23
wiredgeorge
Senior Member
 
wiredgeorge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Mico, TX
Posts: 2,644
Romex that is white is 14 ga and yellow is 12 ga as far as I know. In home wiring applications, the 14 ga stuff is used on 15A circuits and yellow on 20A. Yellow is a tad more expensive and most builders use the lightest guage wire they can get by with to meet code. Problem with using a residential GFI is that it is intended to fit in a box and a residential box is designed for 2x4 framing. If you use one, you won't be using the box. The RV GFI outlet works like all the other RV outlets in that it is in its own shallow case that has wings to retain it to the wall. The wires are secured by blades inside the outlet as there are not screws like a residential outlet. I used a residential box and GFI in my camper for the microwave as the box goes through the partition where the microwave sits and an upper kitchen cabinet. I ran the wires down to an outside outlet and not through the breaker. I use a separate all weather power cord connected to the marine all weather outlet connected to a 15A outlet on a power pedestal. This is to avoid popping the main breaker when the A/C is on and the microwave is used.
__________________
wiredgeorge Mico TX
2006 F350 CC 4WD 6.0L
2002 Keystone Cougar 278
2006 GL1800 Roadsmith Trike
wiredgeorge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2019, 11:24 AM   #24
teacherman
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Lawrence
Posts: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
To answer your question about the ROMEX gauge, 15 amp circuits use 14 ga ROMEX and 20 amp circuits use 12 ga ROMEX. Go to the circuit breaker panel, determine what size circuit breaker is in the circuit, use ROMEX of that appropriate size.

As a warning: Using 14 ga ROMEX in a 20 amp circuit "could cause a fire hazard" as the wiring may get too hot before the circuit breaker opens.
Yeah, I see that a lot in house wiring. Residential codes around here stipulate 12 ga and 20 amp outlets for kitchens, but I use pretty much all 12 in my own stuff except for lights. Sort of the "no replacement for displacement" idea, reinforced by extension cords feeling hot to the touch near the plugs, and the weakest link theory. I've seen a good bit of aluminum wire as well, which was popular a while back. Scary stuff, with all the demands of modern living trying to be supplied with wiring barely adequate at time of installation.

Here's hoping for a quick and low cost solution to the problem!
__________________
2016 Chevy 2500 HD LTZ Crew Cab 6.0

2019 Load Trail 10k payload dump trailer

Bunkhouse trailer to be added soon!
teacherman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2019, 04:12 PM   #25
Par4x4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Stockton
Posts: 21
Problem Solved

I've corrected the problem and all outlets now are working correctly. I replaced the outlet that the refrigerator plugged into and that fixed it. The condensate drain line for frig was broken and had been dripping into the access area and eventually on the plug itself. I moved the plug to a protected area and replaced the drain line and now I'm good to go.

Thanks for everyone's advice.
__________________

Par4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
power

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Keystone RV Company or any of its affiliates in any way. Keystone RVģ is a registered trademark of the Keystone RV Company.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×