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Old 08-30-2019, 05:31 AM   #1
WSCY
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Towing Question

I own a 2018 Keystone Hideout (30 ft) and I tow this with a 2019 Toyota Tundra Crew with a short bed. I typically drive around 60-65 depending on road conditions. My question is as I get passed by semis the trailer is pushed to the right side causing the tow vehicle to want to go left for which I must correct. Is this a typical reaction or is my setup not sufficient to handle these outside forces? The trailer weighs 6115# empty and the truck is 5040# curb weight. Thanks
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Old 08-30-2019, 05:37 AM   #2
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What do you use for weight distribution/ sway control?
Post all numbers from the two stickers on the drivers door post, and from the trailer.
Gives the members a better understanding of what your needs are.
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Old 08-30-2019, 05:54 AM   #3
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There are a lot of discussions on this forum re: weight capacities. When considering trailer weight use the GVWR, not the empty weight. The sticker in the door jamb of your truck should tell you it's load and tow capacity. Your truck is likely out matched. Being able to tow it is one thing. But as you've discovered, being able to tow it safely/comfortably is another.

A 30' trailer is a pretty big sail on the freeway. You would be much happier with a 3/4 ton truck. IMHO
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Old 08-30-2019, 05:56 AM   #4
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Weight distribution with sway bars: Husky Centerline, Max gross weight 8000, weight dist tongue weight 600-800, trailer tongue weight 740. Vehicle towing capacity 10,500, GCVWR 15,200. Vehicle 5040 + trlr 6700=11740.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:02 AM   #5
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I had extensively researched this issue to make sure that all things regarding weight fell within the specs for trailer weight, truck weight and towing capacity, hitch capacity, etc. I thought all was good. The only issue seems to be the wind.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:12 AM   #6
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Makes sense. You did your homework because you wanted to be safe. Sadly, the numbers are one thing...real life experience brings more to the story.

Your loaded tongue weight is likely more like 900-1000 lbs so I do see a mismatch in your setup that can cause a little fish-tailing in stronger wind (or semi suction). A heavier duty hitch with appropriate sway contral may help. That is, if your truck's hitch weight capacity is adequate

Edit: Using GVW numbers for calcs: Vehicle 7000 + trlr 7800 = 14800. Depending on how you load, in addition to the tail being over weight I would say you don't have enough hitch or truck to tow comfortably. Again...JMHO
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:34 AM   #7
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You have to go by the GVWR numbers for both vehicles to get the GCVWR. You have to know exactly what the payload is as posted on your tundra, not a brochure. There are at least 10 Hideouts for that year and length that all have hitch weights that vary from 620 to 850 (empty), with out knowing what you have exactly, it's extremely difficult to figure it out and advise you. The labels on the two vehicles will have the exact numbers and always follow the gross weights, not dry.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:57 AM   #8
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The biggest issue will be the lightness of the TV and the sail size of the 30 footer. Combined they will catch a lot of wind from semis and the anchor weight of the truck.
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Old 08-30-2019, 08:06 AM   #9
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FYI, my trailer is shorter and I checked the real weights as I do to all trucks/cars rvs I own. The tongue weight was listed at 540 lb? (500 something)
Take a guess at the real weight......920 lbs. Loaded for camping, 2 people for a couple days. The fresh water tank full.
Go to a scale and get the real weights of your truck/trailer, check to see if rear tires/axles are rated for that weight. Check your payload weight, see if your within the ratings.
Just talking about my case, my TV is heavier than RV. When a semi passes or I pass a semi, There is always a felt push/pull affect. Same as a car/motorcycle or any vehicle passing a semi. Some you feel the affect more. But, that does not create TV or RV oscillations. I use the lower end WHD and anti sway equipment.
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Old 08-30-2019, 08:15 AM   #10
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Don't post the dry weight of your RV, as has been mentioned numerous times, that is a totally useless number to anyone except the guy that delivered it to your dealer & once he put a battery in it that number changed never to be again.
Max tow weight of your brand of truck also doesn't offer much help, you'll normally exceed the trucks payload long before you reach that tow weight.
Basically without all the useful numbers the answer is too much trailer with not enough truck.
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Old 08-30-2019, 09:06 AM   #11
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I think you already know the answer to the question on is your truck enough to tow that trailer. The reason you are getting pushed around by semi trucks is your truck is not big enough. Sorry, Iím sure that is not what you wanted to hear. In my opinion, you should be towing with a 3/4 ton truck or bigger for a 30 foot travel trailer.
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Old 08-30-2019, 09:29 AM   #12
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My 1500 towed my trailer fine over hilly and flat land. No sway, wasn't pushed around by trucks passing. I was at the top end of payload and gcvwr, but I also made sure my rear end was stable and I will stand by the blue ox sway pro hitch. Drove a little slower, mapped my routes accordingly. I think once the real numbers are looked at, as long as you're not grossly over capacity and your mind set changes, you can do what you can to eliminate the sway, and be safer on the road until you can upgrade. Get a better hitch, put some better shocks in it, maybe some 1000lb air bags it won't get you more pay load, but it will stiffen it up, which helps.
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Old 08-30-2019, 02:23 PM   #13
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Question for the experts on the OP’s post. Long time ago when I joined the forum, one of the biggies at the time was “if you have X for wheel base length on your TV, you should stick to Y for TT length”. Does this line of thought not factor in anymore? Been disproved? I just never see it brought up anymore when dealing with smaller TV and larger TT. Now, everyone focuses on just the weights.
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Old 08-30-2019, 02:44 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vampress_me View Post
Question for the experts on the OP’s post. Long time ago when I joined the forum, one of the biggies at the time was “if you have X for wheel base length on your TV, you should stick to Y for TT length”. Does this line of thought not factor in anymore? Been disproved? I just never see it brought up anymore when dealing with smaller TV and larger TT. Now, everyone focuses on just the weights.
The "generalized rule of thumb" goes like this:
For the first 110" of wheelbase, this allows you 20' of trailer.
For each additional 4" of wheelbase, this gets you 1' more of trailer."

That has been around since Lucy and Desi pulled the "long, long trailer" on their adventures.... A lot has changed since then, improved hitches, anti-sway electronics in vehicles, anti-skid braking systems just to name a few....

So, there's no "hard and fast rule" regarding tow vehicle wheelbase to trailer length ratio, but it's still "clearly evident" that the shorter the wheelbase and/or the longer the trailer, the more unstable the rig will be.

I'd guess that with the new "Blazer and Bronco" models coming out, if they are actually short wheelbase vehicles with large, powerful engines, we're going to see a significant increase in people towing with them which will probably bring us back to including the wheelbase as important in towing stability. Right now, most vehicles used for towing are in the 140+ inch wheelbase category.

Here's one "expert opinion": https://www.etrailer.com/question-301694.html
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:04 PM   #15
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My new 2500 is the same length as my 1500 was, not exactly thrilled with etrailer's expertise in anything rv related.
I saw an awful lot of 3/4 tons pulling 5th wheels that were so overweight, I had to laugh. Made me feel like I wasn't that out of line with the 1500 combo.
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:08 PM   #16
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Thank you, John!

Iíve just been curious over the past few months when questions like this come up, because it seems like the finger gets pointed at weight immediately, and no one brings up trailer length/ wheelbase anymore (probably rightly so, since many have been overloaded). I just took a quick look at wheelbase for a 2020 Tundra CC SB - 145.7Ē. So, using the rule of thumb for that truck, I get 29í (technically 28.93í LOL) length for trailer. Very close to the 30í actual trailer in this post, but is my math working correctly? Which may also contribute to the sway being seen? Or is that where the bars are supposed to help compensate for a shorter wheelbase? I have no clue, just am curious, since Iíve never towed a TT with a short wheelbase vehicle.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:11 PM   #17
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In 1993 I had a F250 SuperCab 7.3l Diesel to tow our HR 34CBFK (35'8"). It towed like a dream. We bought a 1996 Bronco (white with the OJ motif)... It had a 351 4 speed automatic, so I thought, now we'll have 2 trucks to tow the trailer. I had a brake control installed, hitched the HR to the Bronco and we headed down I-49 from Alexandria to Lafayette for the weekend. We made it all the way to Woodworth (famous for its speed traps) before I turned around and limped at 45MPH back to the house to hitch up to the truck and resume the trip. That 105" wheelbase was the most unstable tow vehicle I've ever had the "displeasure" of driving... After hitching to the F250, we towed to the campground with "one hand on the wheel at 65-70 MPH"....

While I won't say that one experience with towing the trailer with a long versus short wheelbase vehicle makes me an expert, I can say that even with my "amateur status" I could immediately tell that there was a significant difference in rig stability between the two tow vehicles with the identical trailer, loaded and hitched exactly the same way.....
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Old 08-31-2019, 06:28 AM   #18
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That actually might be one of the best examples I've heard. Most of us don't have the opportunity to experience that graphic of a comparison. Most don't have 2 TV's lying around. We typically are comparing our complete set ups with someone elses so there are always variables which make some question conventional wisdom and experience.
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:50 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by jsb5717 View Post
That actually might be one of the best examples I've heard. Most of us don't have the opportunity to experience that graphic of a comparison. Most don't have 2 TV's lying around. We typically are comparing our complete set ups with someone elses so there are always variables which make some question conventional wisdom and experience.
The F250 supercab long bed diesel had a wheelbase of 155". The Bronco wheelbase was 105". That extra 50" made all the difference in the world when towing our HR 35' travel trailer. The only thing changed out was the tow vehicle. The trailer loading was never changed, the weight distribution hitch was "essentially the same" as both vehicle receivers were the same height, so the WD bars and chains were "set up in the same chain length". I'd guess, about as close as possible to "identical trailer behind the two vehicles"....

Granted, the Bronco was "overloaded" by the trailer weight rating, but using "the internet logic" that it sat level so it must be OK without airbags, well, you get the picture...

Every time I got above about 50MPH, the back of the trailer would start to whip a bit, any (and I mean ANY) correction on the steering wheel would immediately cause the trailer to swing at least a full lane width in both directions and put the front of the Bronco in a "crisis overcorrection mode"... It was almost like I was driving on ice but still had traction. Definitely not the kind of towing experience that inspires "confidence and a desire to go faster".....
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Old 08-31-2019, 12:10 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Logan X View Post
I think you already know the answer to the question on is your truck enough to tow that trailer. The reason you are getting pushed around by semi trucks is your truck is not big enough. Sorry, Iím sure that is not what you wanted to hear. In my opinion, you should be towing with a 3/4 ton truck or bigger for a 30 foot travel trailer.
^^^This
We have a 27' Outback and tow with a 2015 2WD F250 CC. Our WDH is rated to 1200#. I haven't yet weighed our rig (but plan to) but it is solid as a rock when the semis whizz past me. Yes, I feel it pushed to the side, but the whole setup feels the same as just the truck by itself. We also have the Husky Centerline WDH.
IMO, a Tundra is not sufficient for a 30' TT, that is why we didn't buy one, even though I was very keen on them as a truck for their build and finish quality and durability.
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