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Old 08-01-2018, 04:09 PM   #1
wjslam
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2018 266rb tire wheel specs

Our Outback 266rb was manufactured in May 2017 and came with Trailer King ST225-75R15D tires manufactured in week 8 (Feb) of 2017. We purchased the TT new in January 2018. We have 4300 miles on the China bombs and I have ordered Carlisle HD Trails load range E. In researching wheel specs, I notice that Keystone specs brochure for 2018 and 2019 list ST225 75R15E. (The plackard on out TT shows D.) The 2019 266RB photos show what appear to be the same wheels that are on our rig, so my guess is that they will support the E tires at 80psi with no problem...HOWEVER...I want to be sure. I have not been able to locate a brand or makers mark on the wheels, so I called Keystone and got ZERO help from them. (Shocking!)


Can someone give me a definitive answer as to wheel brand so I can verify before I replace the tires? Thanks much for any help.
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Old 08-01-2018, 04:39 PM   #2
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On the back of your wheel you will find casting information that lists the maximum for two different provisions for that specific wheel . One is the 5 lug weight rating and the other is the 6 lug weight rating. Here is a photo of my wheel casting information. Yours should be the same. If you have 6 lug wheels and the casting weight rating is 6H-**** followed by MAX LOAD 2830 LBS then your wheels are rated to carry 2830 lbs at 80 PSI, the weight capacity of ST225 75R15 LRE tires.
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Old 08-01-2018, 04:40 PM   #3
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Pull a wheel and look at the back. I've never seen a trailer tire that didn't have either the max psi or load on it although I've heard there are some. 2540 lbs = LRD = 65psi. 2830? lbs = LRE = 80psi.
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Old 08-02-2018, 08:53 AM   #4
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A flow chart according to FMVSS.

Tire manufacturers must provide a list of acceptable wheel/rim sizes for all tires they build (not specs).

Wheel/rim manufacturers are not required to put specs on the rims they build. They are required to put the part number/serial number and their address on the wheel. They are also required to provide specs when called for.

OEM providers of wheel/tire assemblies must insure that the assembly meets minimum FMVSS requirements.

The vehicle manufacturer may defer questions about OEM assemblies to the OEM provider. However, when the vehicle manufacturer assembles the wheel/tire assembly, they are responsible for insuring such assemblies meet FMVSS minimum standards and become the contact point for such assemblies.

IMO, the first answer about such assemblies should be provided by the vehicle manufacturer.

NOTE: Every NHTSA recall I have reviewed about improper rim specs for RV trailer applications have been against the vehicle manufacturer. I'm sure it's because they certified the vehicle and in doing so said everything met minimum safety standards, when in fact, the wheels did not.
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Old 08-02-2018, 02:30 PM   #5
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Thanks forum folks. I'm not in a position to pull a wheel at the moment but am going to grab a photo. Will advise. In the meantime, my tires are rated for 2540 single and 2200 dual. My GVWR is 8600 lb. Unless I misunderstand the ratings, that means tires are rated for 8800lb on tandem axle. My research indicates I should have a 15% safety factor. Presently it is 2.3%
Please straighten me out if I'm misunderstanding. I'm 3300 miles away from home
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Old 08-02-2018, 03:36 PM   #6
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Resolved. Couldn't get a clear photo, so made an impression with gum. Took a photo of the impression, flipped it and it reads Max Load 2830 Lbs, so I am good to go. Thanks everyone! I will feel much safer going cross-country in August heat.
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Old 08-02-2018, 04:35 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by wjslam View Post
Thanks forum folks. I'm not in a position to pull a wheel at the moment but am going to grab a photo. Will advise. In the meantime, my tires are rated for 2540 single and 2200 dual. My GVWR is 8600 lb. Unless I misunderstand the ratings, that means tires are rated for 8800lb on tandem axle. My research indicates I should have a 15% safety factor. Presently it is 2.3%
Please straighten me out if I'm misunderstanding. I'm 3300 miles away from home
All RV trailer tires are fitted to the vehicle manufacturer's certified GAWR values shown on the vehicle certification label. According to specs for your trailer, your GAWR axles are probably 4000#. If you apply the new RVIA recommendation, the OE tires should have a minimum load capacity 2200#. The tires you have described as being OE are providing over 25% in load capacity reserves. IMO, they are more than just adequate.
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Old 08-02-2018, 04:49 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by wjslam View Post
Thanks forum folks. I'm not in a position to pull a wheel at the moment but am going to grab a photo. Will advise. In the meantime, my tires are rated for 2540 single and 2200 dual. My GVWR is 8600 lb. Unless I misunderstand the ratings, that means tires are rated for 8800lb on tandem axle. My research indicates I should have a 15% safety factor. Presently it is 2.3%
Please straighten me out if I'm misunderstanding. I'm 3300 miles away from home

Dual application is side by side duals, not dual/tandem axles. The tires on your trailer are rated for 2540. If you have 4000 lb. axles (2x4000=8000 lb. axle rating) - you need to double check that; I would have a problem with a trailer with 8000lb axle capacity and a gvw of 8800 - EVERYTHING needs to be going your way or you will be overloading the axles.. I hope the axles are 5200lb. rating.

In your case, the calculation I would use is your gvw of 8800 and a total tire capacity of 10,160. In that case you have 1360 reserve capacity = 15% safety margin. Your weak spot, REAL weak spot, is if you have 4000 lb. axles....and if your tires are China bombs
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Old 08-02-2018, 05:37 PM   #9
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Dual application is side by side duals, not dual/tandem axles. The tires on your trailer are rated for 2540. If you have 4000 lb. axles (2x4000=8000 lb. axle rating) - you need to double check that; I would have a problem with a trailer with 8000lb axle capacity and a gvw of 8800 - EVERYTHING needs to be going your way or you will be overloading the axles.. I hope the axles are 5200lb. rating.

In your case, the calculation I would use is your gvw of 8800 and a total tire capacity of 10,160. In that case you have 1360 reserve capacity = 15% safety margin. Your weak spot, REAL weak spot, is if you have 4000 lb. axles....and if your tires are China bombs
I misunderstood the dual/single spec, too. Mine is a 2016 26RB, same tires, brand, size, specs, etc. They are stamped "1815."

The TT is 6,760 lbs and max cargo is 2380 (including full water). So I feel a "little" better, that was until I read the words about axle rating...gotta check those axles (and wheels). How do I get that info, I did not see it on the TT sticker? Can I run the VIN on line, like you can to get the additional specs for your TV?

We bought the TT brand new in '16, towed it 25 miles from the dealer to a private campground. My wife passed that August and it has sat there ever since. I use it two or three times a month by myself. Obviously, before it goes on the road one of these days, the Trailer King tires will get replaced with E range, quality skins.

BTW, you guys rock. I had never heard about the tire woes prior to coming to this forum. We had a Dutchman for three years and towed it all over with the OEM tires on it. Guess I'm a lucky guy, maybe I should buy a lottery ticket??
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:12 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by sourdough View Post
Dual application is side by side duals, not dual/tandem axles. The tires on your trailer are rated for 2540. If you have 4000 lb. axles (2x4000=8000 lb. axle rating) - you need to double check that; I would have a problem with a trailer with 8000lb axle capacity and a gvw of 8800 - EVERYTHING needs to be going your way or you will be overloading the axles.. I hope the axles are 5200lb. rating.

In your case, the calculation I would use is your gvw of 8800 and a total tire capacity of 10,160. In that case you have 1360 reserve capacity = 15% safety margin. Your weak spot, REAL weak spot, is if you have 4000 lb. axles....and if your tires are China bombs
More than 600# of the 8600# GVWR rides on the tow vehicle.

The standard reads, in part; the vehicle manufacturer's recommended tongue weight when added to the total vehicle GAWR must not be less than GVWR.

Tire load requirements for RV trailers are determined by the trailer's GAWR values, not the vehicle GVWR.
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:15 PM   #11
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Jim,

First and foremost, condolences on the passing of your wife. After almost 51 years I have NO idea how I could process that.

With a trailer gvw of about 9000 lbs I suspect (hope) you have 5200 lb. axles. My axle weights are on the placard on the side if I recall.

At 9k+loaded weight I would definitely look at LRE tires, especially if you are going to move around. Remember that trailer tires age in place, mileage has little bearing and a nice safety margin is optimal.

Let us know and I hope we get everything figured out.
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:35 PM   #12
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More than 600# of the 8600# GVWR rides on the tow vehicle.

The standard reads, in part; the vehicle manufacturer's recommended tongue weight when added to the total vehicle GAWR must not be less than GVWR.

Tire load requirements for RV trailers are determined by the trailer's GAWR values, not the vehicle GVWR.
CW, I love ya man, but I have to disagree a bit here.

I understand what the standard reads, and if it's not from the RVIA, in my opinion, it's meaningless - even if it's considered law; we need better.

I'm not going to repeat the regulations you mentioned. I will say, again, that tires, MUST have a load rating above the gvw of the trailer, IMO. Tongue weight reduction is silly - I understand that "some" use that figure, but it is unrealistic. When you are running I20 in Shreveport, Jackson Ms etc. and the front end of your trailer is above the back of your tailgate, no, you're not running with the full "tongue weight" on the hitch. It is in fact in the air and sitting, 100% on the trailer tires.

Not to try to debate this, just pointing out that the guidelines saying tires can support less than the gvw of a trailer are....dangerous.
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:42 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by sourdough View Post
Dual application is side by side duals, not dual/tandem axles. The tires on your trailer are rated for 2540. If you have 4000 lb. axles (2x4000=8000 lb. axle rating) - you need to double check that; I would have a problem with a trailer with 8000lb axle capacity and a gvw of 8800 - EVERYTHING needs to be going your way or you will be overloading the axles.. I hope the axles are 5200lb. rating.

In your case, the calculation I would use is your gvw of 8800 and a total tire capacity of 10,160. In that case you have 1360 reserve capacity = 15% safety margin. Your weak spot, REAL weak spot, is if you have 4000 lb. axles....and if your tires are China bombs
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Jim,

First and foremost, condolences on the passing of your wife. After almost 51 years I have NO idea how I could process that.

With a trailer gvw of about 9000 lbs I suspect (hope) you have 5200 lb. axles. My axle weights are on the placard on the side if I recall.

At 9k+loaded weight I would definitely look at LRE tires, especially if you are going to move around. Remember that trailer tires age in place, mileage has little bearing and a nice safety margin is optimal.

Let us know and I hope we get everything figured out.
Yeah, life is definitely different, I love my TT and nature, but it's just me and the cats now. And I ain't in a hurry to go shopping... She was my second, I was her third, but I hit a home run when I met her. We only got married in '08 and one of the first things we did when we met was to go camping. Camping and bike riding are two of my favorite things to do. I haven't yet taken the plunge on a solo camping trip but I'd like to just head out and put some miles on my TT & TV. (I've got a '15 2500HD w only 16K on the odo.)

I was reading from a sticker on the inside of the door frame. I never thought to go look at the plate itself... And I don't have an issue crawling underneath to look at the axles themselves - I just spent some time under there a few weeks ago filling every hole I could find with expanding foam. Mice came calling last winter. So much for a "sealed underbelly."
In the meantime I'll check those axles (they'd better not be 44's!) and start looking at tires. There's always some sort of post warranty stuff to play with. Work a little, relax a little...plus I'm a self employed disabled Vet so I can work from wherever I park the dang thing.
Thanks for the comeback.
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:52 PM   #14
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You need to hook up and go see stuff. Look at the placard on the driver side of the RV...it will have good info. Find a way to get out and "do". You've got a nearly new truck that you need to work on getting broke in . I suspect you have 5200 lb. axles (I hope). The trailer should tell you that on the placard, if not, it should be on the axles underneath. For me, an LRE tire would be the only way to go. Wishing you the best.
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Old 08-02-2018, 10:21 PM   #15
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I will say, again, that tires, MUST have a load rating above the gvw of the trailer, IMO. Tongue weight reduction is silly - I understand that "some" use that figure, but it is unrealistic. When you are running I20 in Shreveport, Jackson Ms etc. and the front end of your trailer is above the back of your tailgate, no, you're not running with the full "tongue weight" on the hitch. It is in fact in the air and sitting, 100% on the trailer tires.

Not to try to debate this, just pointing out that the guidelines saying tires can support less than the gvw of a trailer are....dangerous.
I hate the guidelines too. If I knew what I know now about trailer axle ratings vs tire fitments vs GVWR, I probably would have not bought my current coach. Keystone RV Company decided to save a few bucks and mate 3500 lb axles on my 7600 lb GVWR trailer. Understandably I know the TV will carry 760-1100 lbs at max capacity. But it's still unsettling at times. To pile it on even further, Keystone decided to use a 14" Load C tire that supports only 1760 lbs of weight. That's only 40 lbs over the combined axle capacities and 560 lbs under the GVWR. And dont get me started on the "quality" rubber they decided to fit on the axle spindles.

So what's a new RVer to do in this situation? Most do nothing and pull their trailers with unknown risks. Generally, the risks turn into reality when the first tire failure happens, or when the a required service visit discovers a bent axle.

Prior to the second camping season, I, personally, invested in new wheels and tires (LRE) rated at 2830 lbs @ 80 psi. I only wanted LRD but the DOT date on them surpassed 12 months. The LREs were only 3 months old and were readily available. As I only cold inflate to 72 PSi, I'm still above well above 2580 lbs (LRD for the same size). After all the numbers are conservatively crunched, my trailer had nearly 50% more load carrying capacity than the OEM fitments (at the time I mounted them). This gave me plenty of reserve capacity from a decent quality tire.

In addition, the trailer tires run cooler, the pressures stay consistent, and the trailer seems to ride better.

I wish there was a push to change the tire fitment rules with recreational vehicles. It would save a lot of headache (and money) among new RV folks just trying to make some memories with their trailers.
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Old 08-03-2018, 10:49 AM   #16
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CW, I love ya man, but I have to disagree a bit here.

I understand what the standard reads, and if it's not from the RVIA, in my opinion, it's meaningless - even if it's considered law; we need better.

I'm not going to repeat the regulations you mentioned. I will say, again, that tires, MUST have a load rating above the gvw of the trailer, IMO. Tongue weight reduction is silly - I understand that "some" use that figure, but it is unrealistic. When you are running I20 in Shreveport, Jackson Ms etc. and the front end of your trailer is above the back of your tailgate, no, you're not running with the full "tongue weight" on the hitch. It is in fact in the air and sitting, 100% on the trailer tires. (For how long)?

Not to try to debate this, just pointing out that the guidelines saying tires can support less than the gvw of a trailer are....dangerous.
I'm writing another description for you and will post it in another thread (RV Trailer Tires) when I finish it.
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Old 08-03-2018, 12:19 PM   #17
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Yes, sometimes the setup just doesn't make sense. Some friends of ours bought a new TT about the same time we bought ours. Both are Keystone and came with the exact same tires, 225/75R15D, and axles, 2x 4400lbs. However, our 24ft trailer has a GVWR of 6500 and their 33 footer has a GVWR of 9600. I feel good, but it makes me say Hmmmm.... about their trailer.
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Old 08-03-2018, 08:27 PM   #18
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Yes, sometimes the setup just doesn't make sense. Some friends of ours bought a new TT about the same time we bought ours. Both are Keystone and came with the exact same tires, 225/75R15D, and axles, 2x 4400lbs. However, our 24ft trailer has a GVWR of 6500 and their 33 footer has a GVWR of 9600. I feel good, but it makes me say Hmmmm.... about their trailer.
Check your trailer's certification label. The axles should be set at a GAWR of 3000#.
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Old 08-04-2018, 04:48 AM   #19
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Nope! Why do you say should? Couple of the biggest reasons I chose this trailer vs others similar sized was the 'overkill' on axles and tires and the cargo carrying capacity.
I understand the points you have been making about GVWR and tires, axles and tongue weight. Was just trying to point out it doesn't make sense to me to see the differences in 'margin' between a trailer like mine and my friends. Seems his is more the norm. I am happy I have more wiggle room, or stretch out on the hammock room, compared to many.
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Old 08-04-2018, 06:35 AM   #20
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Nope! Why do you say should? Couple of the biggest reasons I chose this trailer vs others similar sized was the 'overkill' on axles and tires and the cargo carrying capacity.
I understand the points you have been making about GVWR and tires, axles and tongue weight. Was just trying to point out it doesn't make sense to me to see the differences in 'margin' between a trailer like mine and my friends. Seems his is more the norm. I am happy I have more wiggle room, or stretch out on the hammock room, compared to many.
Thanks for the photo. I'm going to ask Keystone why they did that.
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