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Old 07-18-2018, 01:46 PM   #1
Kelan
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Hideout vs Bullet vs Passport

2018 Hideout 212LHS, Bullet Crossfire 2200BH, Passport 239ML
...all have the identical layout that we're looking for (double wide bunks + murphy bed) for our first TT purchase. Other than the layout, we have found some mall differences, but in general I'm most interesting in knowing if there is a built quality difference. Is there much of a difference?
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Old 07-18-2018, 01:54 PM   #2
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Which uses std construction vs. light weight construction?

IMO: Go with standard construction if your TV can handle it.
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Old 07-18-2018, 01:59 PM   #3
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I believe all are considered in the light weight category.
I'm towing with a 2017 GMC Canyon rated for 7,000 lbs.

Hiedout 212LHS: 4,530 lbs dry
Bullet Crossfire 2200BH: 3,975 lbs dry
Passport 239ML: 3,985 lbs dry
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Old 07-18-2018, 03:01 PM   #4
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Dont look at dry weights as other than when you pull it home, it'll never weigh that again. Instead use the trailers GVWR, and stay under that number.
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Old 07-18-2018, 03:52 PM   #5
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Having experience towing with a 2015 Colorado also rated for a max 7000 trailer capacity I would go with the Passport, assuming you are willing to commit to staying within the lower cargo capacity of it over the Bullet.

The 500 lb weight difference and 100 lb heavier tongue weight of the Hideout is huge in towing vehicles of our class, especially with 3 passengers, so I would eliminate it first. And the flatter front profile reduces mileage. I dropped over a mile a gallon going from the Bullet 220RBI to the Avenger 21RB, even though the official dry weights are within 50 pounds of each other and the actual dry weights are almost identical because the previous owner swapped out the OEM 30 lb propane tanks for 20s and the loaded weight of the Avenger is less because it just has less storage.

The reason I would choose the Passport over the Bullet is that it has a double axle and the Bullet only has a single axle. That's a personal preference (if one tire goes flat you still have one good tire on that side). Also many, but not all, feel that a double axle trailer just tows better. Hopefully some on both sides will chime in to better inform your decision.

Good luck, let us know what you decide.
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Old 07-18-2018, 04:03 PM   #6
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I believe you'll find the Hideout is wood frame construction with aluminum siding while the Passport and Bullet are aluminum frame construction with FILON (fiberglass) siding. I believe both the Bullet and the Passport have a "sandwich floor" (luan/Styrofoam/luan) while the Hideout has a 5/8" solid floor.

You can download the brochures for all three at the Keystone website. Go to the "features/highlights/options" section and you can see quite a bit of difference in the three brands. You'll need to make a list and check them off as you compare the differences.
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Old 07-18-2018, 04:50 PM   #7
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You can also do a side by side comparison of many of the specs and features with these links:

https://www.rvusa.com/rv-guide/2018-...212lhs-tr33554

https://www.rvusa.com/rv-guide/2018-...200bhs-tr34812

https://www.rvusa.com/rv-guide/2018-...-239ml-tr34098
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Old 07-19-2018, 11:07 AM   #8
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Thanks everyone. It looks like they dressed up the Hideout with central-vac, colored interior LED accent lighting and LED awning lighting as a way to make it more appealing and make up for the lesser build quality.

With weight being really important due to my tow vehicle, that makes the choice pretty obvious for me. Lower weight with the Bullet/Passport while also getting higher quality materials - all with the exact same floor plan.
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Old 07-19-2018, 11:20 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelan View Post
.................... Lower weight with the Bullet/Passport while also getting higher quality materials - all with the exact same floor plan.
My thoughts: Given the number of recent reports of floor damage and the consequence I observed as a result of small water spills in our TT, I do not consider the Bullet/Passport's structural materials superior.

The lesson I learned is that light weight comes with additional risks.

But in your situation, weight has to be a significant consideration. Just be aware and monitor for leaks very closely.
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Old 07-19-2018, 11:57 AM   #10
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Thanks for that info! I'll do a search for some threads talking about those leak issues and flooring damage, to find out what I need to be watching for.
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Old 07-19-2018, 12:20 PM   #11
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I'm repairing a trailer that I let the maintenance go. All sandwiched sides and floor. Not fun in the heat we are having. Keep up on your roof, and other seals.

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Old 07-19-2018, 01:39 PM   #12
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Wood vs aluminum framing is not "inferior/superior" but is "different" with each having significant advantages and disadvantages. It's the same with solid floor vs sandwich floor construction. Each has advantages and each has some significant disadvantages. Typically, aluminum construction is more expensive and wood framing tends to be focused in the entry level offerings from all manufacturers.

If you go back 75 years, you'll find that all travel trailers were wood frame construction. Along came Airstream and changed that. But, the aluminum framing in todays "square wall trailers" is not the same as Airstream's construction. Today's aluminum framed trailers typically use vacuum bonded fiberglass/luan/Styrofoam/luan construction with the aluminum sidewall "stuck in the middle". If anything happens like an accident, delamination, or problems with the adhesive bond, it becomes a major issue. Advantages: More durable (usually) less maintenance, not as likely to dent as aluminum siding.

It's the same with floors. Solid floors are more "sturdy" when walking on them. They tend to hold up to water seepage better (6 months vs 6 weeks before it shows up) while the sandwich floors tend to be lighter. However, sandwich flooring is not as sturdy when walking on it, is more involved to repair, but seems to have better insulation qualities than solid floors with fiberglass beneath the wood. Once the fiberglass gets wet, it doesn't insulate very well.

It's not really a matter of "better or worse" or "inferior/superior" and it really isn't a matter of "durable/not durable". Typically, wood frame trailers are a bit heavier and not quite as "option filled". That is a matter of marketing, not durability. Sort of like adding lipstick to a pig.... Dress it up, it looks better than before, but underneath, it's still a pig (or a wood frame trailer).... Some people would kill for bacon, some feel very positive for/against wood frame trailers.....

It really boils down to what you want, what you can afford, what your tow vehicle can handle. There are some very nice wood frame trailers and there is some JUNK with aluminum sidewalls, so consider your choices and migrate toward what fits your needs. Good Luck !!!!!
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Old 07-19-2018, 02:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
Wood vs aluminum framing is not "inferior/superior" but is "different" with each having significant advantages and disadvantages. It's the same with solid floor vs sandwich floor construction. Each has advantages and each has some significant disadvantages. Typically, aluminum construction is more expensive and wood framing tends to be focused in the entry level offerings from all manufacturers.

If you go back 75 years, you'll find that all travel trailers were wood frame construction. Along came Airstream and changed that. But, the aluminum framing in todays "square wall trailers" is not the same as Airstream's construction. Today's aluminum framed trailers typically use vacuum bonded fiberglass/luan/Styrofoam/luan construction with the aluminum sidewall "stuck in the middle". If anything happens like an accident, delamination, or problems with the adhesive bond, it becomes a major issue. Advantages: More durable (usually) less maintenance, not as likely to dent as aluminum siding.

It's the same with floors. Solid floors are more "sturdy" when walking on them. They tend to hold up to water seepage better (6 months vs 6 weeks before it shows up) while the sandwich floors tend to be lighter. However, sandwich flooring is not as sturdy when walking on it, is more involved to repair, but seems to have better insulation qualities than solid floors with fiberglass beneath the wood. Once the fiberglass gets wet, it doesn't insulate very well.

It's not really a matter of "better or worse" or "inferior/superior" and it really isn't a matter of "durable/not durable". Typically, wood frame trailers are a bit heavier and not quite as "option filled". That is a matter of marketing, not durability. Sort of like adding lipstick to a pig.... Dress it up, it looks better than before, but underneath, it's still a pig (or a wood frame trailer).... Some people would kill for bacon, some feel very positive for/against wood frame trailers.....

It really boils down to what you want, what you can afford, what your tow vehicle can handle. There are some very nice wood frame trailers and there is some JUNK with aluminum sidewalls, so consider your choices and migrate toward what fits your needs. Good Luck !!!!!
Well said!
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