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Old 04-11-2017, 08:08 AM   #21
ToddB
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Well, I might have used the wrong terminology there. The bottom sticker on the side of the trailer says:

"TIRE AND LOADING INFORMATION
The weight of cargo should never exceed 780 KG or 1720 LBS"

I was taking that to mean that the tires were only rated for a total of 1720 LBS. But the tires themselves say:

"Max Load Single 1760 LBS
Max Load Dual 1570 LBS"

The sticker just above that one, showing Keystone RV company as the manufacturer, provides a GVWR of 7000 LBS, and the curb weight on the Keystone site is listed as 5085 LBS. So there is a difference of 205 LBS between the info provided on the two stickers that I am not certain how to interpret.

With these three pieces of information combined, I'm just trying to figure out what is the maximum SAFE load that I can carry as it is currently configured. But I still don't have info on the wheels themselves at this point, and I know that is crucial.

Sorry to make this painful, but I am struggling to sort through it all.
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Old 04-11-2017, 08:11 AM   #22
srvnt
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Originally Posted by cpt_majestic View Post
Sorry make another tire thread, I'm sure it's been beaten to death, but this has been driving me nuts.

We have a 2012 Hideout 26 RLSWE currently running original Power King Tow Max STR, 205/75/15. The tires are coming on 5 years old and we are going to Utah in May and want to get them replaced because I won't feel comfortable on 5 year old tires going 1500 miles, duh.

I've been reading reviews and just going insane. What I've isolated it down to are GoodYear Endurance's or the GoodYear Marathons, the Marathons are similar to the Power Kings (1820 lbs./50-psi), where the Endurance is (2150 lbs/65 psi), would there be a pro/con to going with the Endurance's? I know the marathons had a recall, but I'm not sure if that's a valid reason. The cost is only around $125.00 total difference.

Thanks
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Old 04-11-2017, 09:23 AM   #23
sourdough
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ToddB - "With these three pieces of information combined, I'm just trying to figure out what is the maximum SAFE load that I can carry as it is currently configured?"

My thought would be not much if I'm reading your numbers right. If the GVW of the trailer is 7000 lbs. and the max. weight for your tires is 1760 x4 = 7040 you have very little margin for error on the tires.

There is the premise that the tongue carries some of the weight so you can deduct that from the weight the tires carry. I don't go by that. When I'm on an undulating highway (Jackson, MS for example) there are many times that my tongue is UP - the full weight of the trailer is on the tires plus some I'm sure. The weight is being shoved up and down on the tires as we bounce along - the hitch weight is not fully carried by the truck at those times.

Some of Keystone's trailers seem to come with a nice reserve capacity but it seems they stick with the same tires as the trailers get larger until they are almost overloaded before they go to a larger size. Why I have no idea.

My trailer has a gvw of 10,000 lbs. My OE tires were rated at 2540 each or 10,160. I had one self destruct in short order causing 7k in damage. I'm positive it is for the reasons I mentioned above. I upgraded to a LRE tire and feel much better and have had no issues in two trips to FL and back to TX. My tires also seem to run cooler that they did with the LRD tires (taken with an infrared heat gun).

My thought would be to replace your tires before you take a long trip and find the underside or side of your trailer missing due to a tire failure.
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Old 04-11-2017, 10:24 AM   #24
Desert185
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Another thing to consider is that the tires degrade in capabilty a certain percentage each year. By the time you reach the end of life of the tire, any margin that might have existed is gone, with the effective remaining capacity possibly below the gross weight being carried.

If I were that close with tire loading, I would go from a LRC to a D or a D to an E with a Maxxis or Carlisle tire...metal stems, balanced and with a TPMS installed.

There are enough threats on the road without incurring one you could have prevented with a little preparation and maybe more than a few dollars. Doing nothing could result in even more dollars expended.
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Old 04-11-2017, 05:03 PM   #25
CWtheMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
As a newbie about to hit the road full-time, I really appreciate all of the info about tires and wheels. It will absolutely keep my family safer on the road.

What really gets me is how the trailer manufacturers and dealers can get away with selling me a BRAND NEW trailer that is stated to have a 1,950 lbs cargo capacity (one of the selling points because of my full-time plans) while putting tires on the trailer that are only rated for 1,720 lbs! (Haven't checked the wheel load capacity yet, but will soon thanks to this post.)

One RVer I follow had THREE blowouts in the first six months on his new trailer because the tires were lower rated (below trailer cargo capacity). If I hadn't seen his video about learning this important piece of info after the fact, I wouldn't have thought to look into all of these issues.

So I'm grateful to him and grateful to you folks for laying all of this out and keeping us safe. Long live the forum.
The cargo capacity label is affixed to the trailer as it was equipped when it left the factory. For all practical purposes it is unused space for weight that was left over once all other weights were established.

Other factors are the manufacturers' values for each axle shown on the certification label as GAWR. Now, the trailer manufacturer must come-up with an acceptable recommended tongue/hitch weight. By acceptable, it must work and have a value within industry standards. Then they must add that hitch weight to total GAWR weights. The sum MUST equal or exceed GVWR.

For RV trailers, tires are fitted to each GAWR according to the weight rating of the GAWR axles. The trailer manufacturer must also set a cold recommended tire inflation pressure that is appropriate for the installed tires. That info is also on the certification label/tire placard.

If a dealer installs options totaling more than 100#, before the trailer is sold, they must amend the cargo label to reflect the weight changes.

The tires on the trailer at the time of first sale must be the same size identified on the certification label.

On edit: I went and looked at the specs for your trailer. Your GAWR axles should be about 3200# ea.. You can verify that by looking at the certification label on the LH forward external section of your trailer.
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Old 04-11-2017, 05:28 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Desert185 View Post
Another thing to consider is that the tires degrade in capabilty a certain percentage each year. By the time you reach the end of life of the tire, any margin that might have existed is gone, with the effective remaining capacity possibly below the gross weight being carried.

If I were that close with tire loading, I would go from a LRC to a D or a D to an E with a Maxxis or Carlisle tire...metal stems, balanced and with a TPMS installed.

There are enough threats on the road without incurring one you could have prevented with a little preparation and maybe more than a few dollars. Doing nothing could result in even more dollars expended.
That about sums it up perfectly.
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