Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
 

Go Back   Keystone RV Forums > Keystone Fleet | Keystone RV Models > Travel Trailers
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-16-2017, 07:26 AM   #1
cpt_majestic
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 28
another tire question

Sorry make another tire thread, I'm sure it's been beaten to death, but this has been driving me nuts.

We have a 2012 Hideout 26 RLSWE currently running original Power King Tow Max STR, 205/75/15. The tires are coming on 5 years old and we are going to Utah in May and want to get them replaced because I won't feel comfortable on 5 year old tires going 1500 miles, duh.

I've been reading reviews and just going insane. What I've isolated it down to are GoodYear Endurance's or the GoodYear Marathons, the Marathons are similar to the Power Kings (1820 lbs./50-psi), where the Endurance is (2150 lbs/65 psi), would there be a pro/con to going with the Endurance's? I know the marathons had a recall, but I'm not sure if that's a valid reason. The cost is only around $125.00 total difference.

Thanks
cpt_majestic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 07:27 AM   #2
sourdough
Site Team
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: W. Texas
Posts: 12,468
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpt_majestic View Post
Sorry make another tire thread, I'm sure it's been beaten to death, but this has been driving me nuts.

We have a 2012 Hideout 26 RLSWE currently running original Power King Tow Max STR, 205/75/15. The tires are coming on 5 years old and we are going to Utah in May and want to get them replaced because I won't feel comfortable on 5 year old tires going 1500 miles, duh.

I've been reading reviews and just going insane. What I've isolated it down to are GoodYear Endurance's or the GoodYear Marathons, the Marathons are similar to the Power Kings (1820 lbs./50-psi), where the Endurance is (2150 lbs/65 psi), would there be a pro/con to going with the Endurance's? I know the marathons had a recall, but I'm not sure if that's a valid reason. The cost is only around $125.00 total difference.

Thanks
See my reply to your other post in the other thread (tires).
sourdough is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 08:44 AM   #3
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 2,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpt_majestic View Post
Sorry make another tire thread, I'm sure it's been beaten to death, but this has been driving me nuts.

We have a 2012 Hideout 26 RLSWE currently running original Power King Tow Max STR, 205/75/15. The tires are coming on 5 years old and we are going to Utah in May and want to get them replaced because I won't feel comfortable on 5 year old tires going 1500 miles, duh.

I've been reading reviews and just going insane. What I've isolated it down to are GoodYear Endurance's or the GoodYear Marathons, the Marathons are similar to the Power Kings (1820 lbs./50-psi), where the Endurance is (2150 lbs/65 psi), would there be a pro/con to going with the Endurance's? I know the marathons had a recall, but I'm not sure if that's a valid reason. The cost is only around $125.00 total difference.

Thanks
Basically when adding a load range to the same sized tire you are satisfying the intent of the certification label and also gaining some welcomed load capacity reserves. Those reserves can only be achieved by using higher inflation pressures which the higher load capacity tire can provide. However, the Original Equipment rims may not have the specifications for the increased load capacity and inflation pressures. If the rim does not provide you with that information it is recommended to call the rim manufacturer for conformation.
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 08:46 AM   #4
Tbos
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Solomons
Posts: 3,874
No history on the Endurance yet. I bought Carlisle Radial Trail HDs last summer and have been very happy with them. I increased the load rating so I'd have an extra safety cushion.


2016 Passport GT 2810BHS, 2016 F350 CC DRW
__________________
Tom
2019 Alpine 3651RL
2016 F350 CC DRW
Tbos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 10:27 AM   #5
PARAPTOR
Site Team | Emeritus
 
PARAPTOR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western PA
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWtheMan View Post
Basically when adding a load range to the same sized tire you are satisfying the intent of the certification label and also gaining some welcomed load capacity reserves. Those reserves can only be achieved by using higher inflation pressures which the higher load capacity tire can provide. However, the Original Equipment rims may not have the specifications for the increased load capacity and inflation pressures. If the rim does not provide you with that information it is recommended to call the rim manufacturer for conformation.
Okay since I am having one of those Senior Moment Days today, How do you interpret the PSI rating on these rims. Example many members have elected to upgrade to 110 PSI G rated tires, think Salium ??? on their rims rated at 110 PSI. One of my reasons for not going to G rated tires were knowing that my rims were marked at 110 PSI I was concerned and went with the Carlisle Radial Trail RH ST235/85/R16 F at 95 PSI to stay below that rim 110 PSI rating.

If I recall one member did upgrade his rims for the G rated tire. When these G rated tires start heating up I am sure they will exceed the 110 PSI rating of those rims.

So how should we view these rim PSI ratings. Is this the same as our favorite posts on ignore numbers and I Can and have been Towing That ?
__________________
2013 RAPTOR 300MP w/Rear Patio Deck NO Folding Side Ladder
2013 Silverado 3500HD LTZ CC LB 4X4 DRW
Duramax 6.6L Turbo Diesel; Allison Trans
Reese 20K; Carlisle Radial Trail RH/HD; TPMS (12 Tires)

Veteran


PSU (GO LIONS)
PARAPTOR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 03:59 PM   #6
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 2,559
These are a couple of bullets from tire industry standards. Bottom line; When in doubt, ask the rim/wheel manufacturer about specs and limits.

Never exceed the maximum load capacity and/or inflation pressure of the rim/wheel.

Never utilize an unapproved rim/wheel or one that does not meet the approved rim width range for the selected tires.
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 04:22 PM   #7
gearhead
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Liberty, Texas
Posts: 3,985
CW I think PARAPTOR is concerned about putting G tires on wheels rated for 110psi max and then they exceed that pressure in use. My E tires at 80psi cold will get to 88psi in use. I would assume the wheel that is rated at 110psi (or 80) is designed for the expected increase in pressure while in use?
__________________
2018 Ram 3500 Laramie CC DRW LWB 4X4 Cummins Aisin 3.73
Reese Goosebox 20K
2018 Heartland Landmark 365 Oshkosh
2008 Bigfoot 25C9.4 LB Cabover
gearhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 05:10 PM   #8
PARAPTOR
Site Team | Emeritus
 
PARAPTOR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western PA
Posts: 2,733
Thanks gearhead, that's the question
PARAPTOR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 05:32 PM   #9
Tbos
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Solomons
Posts: 3,874
I could be wrong but I can't imagine that a rim PSI isn't done like a tire. It just doesn't say so on it.


2016 Passport GT 2810BHS, 2016 F350 CC DRW
__________________
Tom
2019 Alpine 3651RL
2016 F350 CC DRW
Tbos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 05:40 PM   #10
PARAPTOR
Site Team | Emeritus
 
PARAPTOR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western PA
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbos View Post
I could be wrong but I can't imagine that a rim PSI isn't done like a tire. It just doesn't say so on it.


2016 Passport GT 2810BHS, 2016 F350 CC DRW
Boy can not remember how many times I have said this while looking into a RV issue
__________________
2013 RAPTOR 300MP w/Rear Patio Deck NO Folding Side Ladder
2013 Silverado 3500HD LTZ CC LB 4X4 DRW
Duramax 6.6L Turbo Diesel; Allison Trans
Reese 20K; Carlisle Radial Trail RH/HD; TPMS (12 Tires)

Veteran


PSU (GO LIONS)
PARAPTOR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 05:53 PM   #11
CaptnJohn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Ocean Isle Beach
Posts: 1,375
Carlisle has a good reputation. Endurance is too new to have a reputation. Marathon are not reviewed very well... That should give my answer....
__________________

2019 Montana 3761 FL
2019 F350 6.7 4X4 DRW

Edgewater 205 EX Yamaha 150
CaptnJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 08:10 PM   #12
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 2,559
Tire and wheel builders use various laws of thermodynamics to account for the increased pressures generated by heat. In the fitment of wheels and tires the recommended cold inflation pressures for the maximum load capacities have therefore been accounted for.

An OEM tire with a maximum load capacity of 3520# @ 80 psi would not overtax an OEM rim with a maximum load capacity of 3520# @ 80 psi.
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 08:31 PM   #13
PARAPTOR
Site Team | Emeritus
 
PARAPTOR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western PA
Posts: 2,733
Got it
__________________
2013 RAPTOR 300MP w/Rear Patio Deck NO Folding Side Ladder
2013 Silverado 3500HD LTZ CC LB 4X4 DRW
Duramax 6.6L Turbo Diesel; Allison Trans
Reese 20K; Carlisle Radial Trail RH/HD; TPMS (12 Tires)

Veteran


PSU (GO LIONS)
PARAPTOR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2017, 09:13 AM   #14
itat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Eastern GTA
Posts: 195
To the OP looking at 205/75/15 tires. The Maxxis M8008 tires are very highly rated. I've also had good luck with Duro ST tires. My previous popup had Carlisle tires that lasted more than 10 years.

I have a personal bias against Goodyear tires of any kind. The Marathons have mixed reviews and the Endurance are too new.
__________________
2019 Rockwood Signature Ultra Lite 8290BS, B&W Patriot 18K
2016 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCrew, 6.2L, 4x4, 6'9" bed, 3.73
2011 Rockwood Signature Ultra Lite 8293SS (2015 - 2018)
itat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2017, 01:55 PM   #15
cpt_majestic
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 28
This thread has really enlightened me. So my current tires are 1820lbs \50psi, c rated, yet I cant find a tire that is 8ply D rated in 1820lbs. I've attached the sticker that's on my current wheel and it clearly says 1820, yet when I pull up the tech sheet from dexstar it says my model can handle up to 2150 lbs, I have attached the sticker and will have to call dexstar on Monday because I just missed them, time zone wise..

Does that look about right?? Thanks


http://www.dexstarwheel.com/products.pdf

cpt_majestic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 05:54 AM   #16
cpt_majestic
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 28
I spoke to Dexstar this morning and she said this "older" wheel was only rated for 1820lbs, the newer models are now rated for 2150 lbs..So it looks like I'm stuck with C rated's or upgrade my wheels...ugh
cpt_majestic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2017, 03:00 AM   #17
itat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Eastern GTA
Posts: 195
Did Dexstar say the wheels can't handle 65 psi? Sure they may be limited in weight capacity but a LRD tire, properly inflated, will be a better tire. Just don't load your trailer to be heavier than the wheels can handle. Either way, stick with a highly rated tire brand/model.
__________________
2019 Rockwood Signature Ultra Lite 8290BS, B&W Patriot 18K
2016 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCrew, 6.2L, 4x4, 6'9" bed, 3.73
2011 Rockwood Signature Ultra Lite 8293SS (2015 - 2018)
itat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2017, 04:06 AM   #18
bsmith0404
Senior Member
 
bsmith0404's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Las Cruces
Posts: 3,041
As stated, find out what the psi rating is for the wheel. IMO it is okay to put a tire on that is rated for more weight than the wheel as long as you do not exceed the weight rating for the wheel. It's no different than upgrading the tire and wheel combo for more weight than the axle is rated for. At that point you just can't exceed the rating of the axle. It doesn't hurt to increase the capability of any of the 3 components as long as your actual weights don't exceed the capability of the weakest link.
__________________

Brent
2013 Alpine 3500RE
2019 Silverado 2500HD Duramax
U.S. Air Force Retired (25 yrs)
RV Sales Consultant
bsmith0404 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 07:47 AM   #19
ToddB
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Leander
Posts: 11
This tire thing is killing me

As a newbie about to hit the road full-time, I really appreciate all of the info about tires and wheels. It will absolutely keep my family safer on the road.

What really gets me is how the trailer manufacturers and dealers can get away with selling me a BRAND NEW trailer that is stated to have a 1,950 lbs cargo capacity (one of the selling points because of my full-time plans) while putting tires on the trailer that are only rated for 1,720 lbs! (Haven't checked the wheel load capacity yet, but will soon thanks to this post.)

One RVer I follow had THREE blowouts in the first six months on his new trailer because the tires were lower rated (below trailer cargo capacity). If I hadn't seen his video about learning this important piece of info after the fact, I wouldn't have thought to look into all of these issues.

So I'm grateful to him and grateful to you folks for laying all of this out and keeping us safe. Long live the forum.
ToddB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2017, 07:58 AM   #20
TallEddie
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Fredericksburg VA
Posts: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
As a newbie about to hit the road full-time, I really appreciate all of the info about tires and wheels. It will absolutely keep my family safer on the road.

What really gets me is how the trailer manufacturers and dealers can get away with selling me a BRAND NEW trailer that is stated to have a 1,950 lbs cargo capacity (one of the selling points because of my full-time plans) while putting tires on the trailer that are only rated for 1,720 lbs! (Haven't checked the wheel load capacity yet, but will soon thanks to this post.)

One RVer I follow had THREE blowouts in the first six months on his new trailer because the tires were lower rated (below trailer cargo capacity). If I hadn't seen his video about learning this important piece of info after the fact, I wouldn't have thought to look into all of these issues.

So I'm grateful to him and grateful to you folks for laying all of this out and keeping us safe. Long live the forum.
When you look at the cargo capacity, you have to consider the trailer as a whole, not look at individual tires. Sure, the tires individually have a 1720 lb capacity, but you have more than one tire. you also have to add in the weight carried on the hitch. It is quite common for the load capacity of all the tires combined to be less than the GVWR of the trailer, because some of the trailers weight is carried by the tow vehicle by the hitch.
__________________
2012 F250 6.2L
2014 Laredo 303TG
Reese Dual Cam WD Hitch
TallEddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Keystone RV Company or any of its affiliates in any way. Keystone RV® is a registered trademark of the Keystone RV Company.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.