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Old 08-01-2015, 09:43 PM   #1
roadglide
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16 inch truck tires for the RV.

I was talking with a guy about tires at the RV park, this guy said I should get rid of the trailer tires and go with 16 inch 10 ply truck tires because the truck tires are better built for safety reasons. It made cents to me because how often are recalls for trailer blow out and someone one gets killed? this full timer said he hasn't had a blow out with truck tires.
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Old 08-01-2015, 10:39 PM   #2
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According to the specs on your rig, you are just under 7.000 lbs on each axle, so LT tires will not work, they are only good for 3042 lbs per tire. The ST tires that probably came on your rig probably just made the specs for your load. You will be better off going with a Goodyear G614 or the equivalent Sailun tire, or something similar that is rated 14 ply, and in both the tires I mentioned, are all steel cord and will give you very safe service, as they are rated 3750 lbs per tire, which gives you the full rating of your 7,000 lb axles.
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Old 08-02-2015, 05:18 AM   #3
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Or F rated Carlisle at 3960.
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Old 08-02-2015, 07:05 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by bsmith0404 View Post
Or F rated Carlisle at 3960.
There again the Carlisle 3960 are trailer tires, I think trailer tires are skimped on for reinforcement along the line or there wouldn't be so many premature blow outs.The G614 Goodyear is a heavy duty truck tire and both brands are sold at discount tire or Walmart where I buy my tires.
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Old 08-02-2015, 07:40 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by roadglide View Post
There again the Carlisle 3960 are trailer tires, I think trailer tires are skimped on for reinforcement along the line or there wouldn't be so many premature blow outs.
Well here is the thing about the so-called "premature blow outs". What is the other side of that blow out story? Were tire pressures being properly maintained? What speeds were those tires subjected to? I would be willing to bet that a good number of these blow outs were due to negligence on the part of the owners. Fun fact, there isn't a trailer tire on the market rated for more than 65mph. I see people pulling their trailers at 75 or 80 on a regular basis. I bet these same people didn't bother to check their trailer's tire pressures before leaving on that trip. Low pressures combined with over speed equals blow outs. Just sayin.
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Old 08-02-2015, 07:53 AM   #6
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ST tires have stiffer sidewalls than LT tires reducing sidewall flex which is a contributor to sway. I've been running Carlisle tires on all of my trailers for many years and countless thousands of miles without a single issue. That includes a 1400 mile trip with (yes, I'll admit it) an overloaded car hauler, about 200 lbs over per tire. The car hauler was purchased specifically for my corvette, but I had to transport my son's Jeep Grand Cherokee after an engine failure.

A lot of people have had success with Ribs and G614s, to each their own.
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Old 08-02-2015, 09:00 AM   #7
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Do yourself a favor and as stated above look at the Sailun S637, this tire is a beast. The supposed "stiffer sidewall" on the ST tire can't even come close to the S637. We have a set and I can honestly say that the sidewall is at least 1 inch thick. Our original POS GY Marathions weighed 36 lbs. each .... the Sailuns were 62 lbs !! You can find them on ebay for around $195 or so by a seller that goes by "rustybore" ....and it's free shipping. ooop's my bad, just looked on ebay and "rustybore" has them now for $210 each free shipping.....still worth every penny.
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Old 08-02-2015, 05:31 PM   #8
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I agree with the above. The Sailun tires weighed twice what the OEM tire did. They look like a scaled down Michellin that you see on diesel pushers.
LT truck tires may be fine and there are other options, but the Sailun's are beasts.

You can buy them for under $150:
http://simpletire.com/sailun-235-85r16-8244393-tires

Plus, your OEM tires probably weren't balanced.
Make sure you consider two other things:
1) The max psi rating of your wheels (should be stamped on there)
2) The max psi rating of the valves on the wheels.
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Old 08-02-2015, 07:12 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by bobbecky View Post
According to the specs on your rig, you are just under 7.000 lbs on each axle, so LT tires will not work, they are only good for 3042 lbs per tire. The ST tires that probably came on your rig probably just made the specs for your load. You will be better off going with a Goodyear G614 or the equivalent Sailun tire, or something similar that is rated 14 ply, and in both the tires I mentioned, are all steel cord and will give you very safe service, as they are rated 3750 lbs per tire, which gives you the full rating of your 7,000 lb axles.
Your correct I checked my tires st 235 80 /16 have a load rating 3520 lbs with 7 thousand lb axles. I should be good with the tires I have . On the cat scale loaded for a trip the trailer axes are under 11000 lbs, with the Harley in the garage, took weight off the truck.
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Old 08-03-2015, 01:21 PM   #10
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If your axle weight is 11k:
Your tires are rated for 14080 in ideal conditions. You're at 78% of rated capacity on those tires, assuming that's how your drive fully loaded.

Your rig probably isn't perfectly level, so I'd guess that you have at least some front to rear and left to right imbalance. That puts your at least one tire into the 80%+ of rated capacity range.

Under-inflate / over-inflate and you can see how things can get out of the "good" zone pretty quickly. There is also the theory that tires degrade at 5-10% of rated capacity per year.

What is the brand on your stock tire now? .
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Old 08-03-2015, 03:37 PM   #11
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What Seabee said. We also have gone to Sailun tires and they seem to be great so far. I have been told that truck tires are not a good idea for trailers unless you never make any sharp turns. They are not made to scuff sideways when turning.
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Old 08-06-2015, 03:57 PM   #12
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http://www.bobbystuff.com/RV/index.php?blog=192 Trailer king .
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:57 AM   #13
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LT Tires

I have been RVing since the early 90's and have experienced numerous tire issues, separations, blow outs and side wall break downs. The last 2 RV's I have owned are large campers and I installed LT over ST tires and have had great luck with these tires. I purchased a new camper last year and took the 15" ST 8 ply tires off and replaced with 16" BF Goodrich Commercial TA 10 ply truck tires and this sure gives you piece of mind. I have ran these many miles on the last 2 campers and I have not experienced any tire issues since. Note that if the tires are not rated for the load then do not install them, also always ensure they are inflated to the max by the manufacturer.

Happy Trailering!
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Old 08-14-2015, 10:12 PM   #14
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I was at CW a couple of weeks back and the larger Cougar and Montana 5ers all had LT tires on them.

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Old 08-15-2015, 05:05 AM   #15
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Got my Sailuns for $710 delivered to my front door from Simple Tire. Rated for 75mph and miles of confidence.
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Old 08-15-2015, 08:14 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Cyncwby View Post
Do yourself a favor and as stated above look at the Sailun S637, this tire is a beast. The supposed "stiffer sidewall" on the ST tire can't even come close to the S637. We have a set and I can honestly say that the sidewall is at least 1 inch thick. Our original POS GY Marathions weighed 36 lbs. each .... the Sailuns were 62 lbs !! You can find them on ebay for around $195 or so by a seller that goes by "rustybore" ....and it's free shipping. ooop's my bad, just looked on ebay and "rustybore" has them now for $210 each free shipping.....still worth every penny.
X2 Sailuns are the way to go. Shop around. I got mine at Big O for $140 a tire. The other Big O 7 miles away wanted $165. I have put 3600 miles on them in the past 2 months, driving 70-75 mph and not even a hiccup. So glad I dumped the ST tires before something bad happened.
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Old 08-17-2015, 06:07 AM   #17
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Shopping for a new set for our Cougar 327res after a blow out this weekend. Never heard of Sailun until yesterday. Good to know. Thanks all.
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Old 08-17-2015, 06:19 AM   #18
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Pookie, what tires did you have and how old are they?
Note the Sailuns probably won't be carried by your local tire dealer. If you go to simpletire, you can order them and ship them to your local dealer (in most cases). Business shipping saves about 50% of the cost.
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Old 08-17-2015, 06:41 AM   #19
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Pookie, all your NTB tire places in Ohio can help you out. NTB, Tire Kingdom and OTB are all owned by the same group and all can get the rubber for you. We also have the Sailun 637's and they have worked just fine.
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Old 09-06-2015, 09:30 PM   #20
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Pookie we have a 327RES that had a tire delaminate (tread broke away) and caused damage to the slide. We ordered up a set of Michelin PS ribs after a talk with our tire guy. No more ST(Chinese) tires for me. I've copied an interesting article that I read before making a decision on which tire to get.....Interesting read

I copied and pasted this portion of a post by Mike Mitchell, NuWa (HitchHiker) CEO in a discussion regarding trailer tires on the NuWa Owner's Forum.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

"Read the following and learn from this RV.net fellows research. MIKE

As we banter about regarding tire types and loading, I believe that we are finally starting to understand a few important things.

I have asked many times for someone to explain how a ST tire can be rated to carry more weight than a LT tire in a similar size, without a good answer.

The answer lies in what is called reserve capacity. To quote from Trailer Parts Superstore and this same statement exist on just about every tire site:

HEAVY DUTY 'LT' TRUCK / TRAILER TIRES
'LT' signifies the tire is a "Light Truck/Trailer" series that can be used on trailers that are capable of carrying heavy cargo such as equipment trailers.

If a tire size begins with 'LT' it signifies the tire is a "Light Truck-metric" size that was designed to be used on trailers that are capable of carrying heavy cargo or tow vehicles. Tires branded with the "LT" designation are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.

So what is reserve capacity? It is capacity beyond the rating of the tire, capacity that is held in reserve. This reserve capacity comes from the heavy-duty sidewall of the LT type tires. LT's rank at the top of the list when we look at P, ST and LT tires.

Now I finally have an answer to how a ST tire can be rated to carry more weight than a LT tire of similar size.

The ratings of ST tires infringe into the reserve capacity of the tire. This is double bad, because the design of the ST gives us a tire with less reserve capacity to start with as it has a lighter sidewall to start with as most ST tires are much lighter than their LT counterparts.

To quote one tire site:
"Put a different way, the load carrying capacity of an ST tire is 20% greater than an LT tire. Since durability is strictly a long term issue - and the results of a tire failure on a trailer are much less life threatening than on a truck - the folks that set up these load / inflation pressure relationships allow a greater......ah......let's call it load intensity."

There it is in print to be read. They make a calculated decision to give the ST tire a higher load rating because a failure is less life threatening.

I have on a number of occasions pointed out the weight difference between the different tires and have been told that does not matter. Well it does matter. The rubber in the average tire only makes up around 40 some percent of its weight, the rest is in the steel belts, gum strips, steel beads, and the carcass plies. The remaining 60 or so percent of the stuff in a tire is what builds in the reserve capacity.

So to review again, here are some weights:
1. Michelin XPS RIB LT235/85R16 LRE (rated to 3042lbs) Weight 55.41
2. Goodyear G614 LT235/85R16 LRG (rated to 3750lbs) Weight 57.5
3. Bridgestone Duravis R250 LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 60
4. BFG Commercial TA LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 44.44
5. Uniroyal Laredo HD/H LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 44.44
6. GY Marathon ST235/80R16 LRE(rated to 3420lbs) Weight 35.4

So which tires on the list have the most reserve capacity? Well that is not a completely simple answer, as one of the tires is a G rate 110 lb tire and the rest are LRE at 80lb inflation. So if we disregard the G614, then the Michelin XPS RIB and the Bridgestone Duravis R250 due to their all-steel ply construction will have the most reserve capacity inherent in their construction. The twin Commercial TA and Laredo will be next and the Marathon would have little or no reserve capacity available because it was used up in its higher load rating, AND because of it's much lighter construction it had much less inherent reserve capacity to start with.

So what have we learn from this?

I think that the first thing that we learned was that a LT tire can be used at or near it max rated loading without having issues, as they built with "substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo".

The second thing we may have learned is why ST tires are failing on mid to larger 5th wheels, in that they do not have inherent reserve capacity beyond that rated max loading. Again this is because they have less reserve capacity to start with and their greater "load intensity" used up any reserve capacity that might have been available.

Now, here is an interesting bit of information. I just called Maxxis Tech Line and asked the weights for two tires.

ST235/80R16 LRD 3000 lb rating at 65 lbs of air weights 38.58
ST235/80R16 LRE 3420 lb rating at 80 lbs of air weights 43.43

What??? The Maxxis load range E tire weights almost the same as the Commercial TA?? This is a ST tire that has heavier construction than the GY Marathon at 35.4 lbs. So it has more inherent reserve capacity due to its heavier construction.

Those that claimed its virtues maybe did not know why it was a better ST tire than some of the others, but there it is! It is a heavier built tire with more reserve capacity.

So as one chooses a replacement tire or is asking for an upgrade on a new trailer please get educated on where the reserve capacity exist. Is it inherent in the tire you choose or do you have to factor it into the weight rating of the tire you choose.

Those with heavy trailers that are switching to 17.5 rims and tires rated to 4805 lbs and getting a double injection of reserve capacity, in that they are using a tire with lots of inherent reserve capacity and the tire has much more capacity than the application. It is all starting to make sense.

I have learn a bit this week, hopefully others have also.

Chris"



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