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Old 09-26-2014, 05:36 AM   #1
Packed2Go
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Winterizing water line between tank and pump

I've read the winterizing section of the user manual that came with my 321RES,
I've seen countless videos and forum discussions but none address winterizing the supply water line between the pump and tank. They do mention emptying the tank and then running the pump until it draws air but I would still think water drops could run back down the line and freeze. The discussions mentioning putting RV antifreeze in the tank seem to have a mixed following. If I was to run the pump until it drew air and the residual water drops simply drained back into the tank, then I'm fine with that but I assumed that there is a check valve in the tank - end of the line to keep the water from draining back into the tank.

Comments please.....

Thanks in advance,
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Old 09-26-2014, 05:41 AM   #2
Trailsport07
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There is a hand pump you can buy from an RV store for $20 to $25. dollars. Hooks to you city water line and black tank flush. Then just pump right out of a gallon ov RV anti freeze directly into your system. Just open up one faucet inside and leave you pump off.
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Old 09-26-2014, 07:04 AM   #3
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Packed2Go - I've never experienced any issues with any water that might remain in the line between the FW tank and the pump when winterizing. As part of the process, I drain the tank, open/close any necessary faucets/valves, blow the lines out with air, then hook up a container of antifreeze to the pump, turn it on and let it do its thing.

I don't think that a small amount of water drops that may run down the line would be enough to cause any damage if they should happen to freeze.

The hand pump described above is a worthwhile item to have. However, it won't address the potential "problem" you mentioned since it is used in the city water lines not the FW/potable lines.
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Old 09-26-2014, 10:31 AM   #4
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The line that goes into the tank has an open end, therefore any water in that lines will drain out as long as the water tank is empty. Never been a problem for me.
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Old 09-26-2014, 05:13 PM   #5
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Trailsport07,Festus2 and therink...thanks much for your replies.

The hand pump is on my short list in the event I need to freeze proof the lines during a late fall trip. So far I haven't used the city water connection and I intend to burp it and clear the black tank flush when I blow the lines at the end of the season.

Since the flojet pump has quick disconnect water fittings, I'm going to add a connector for the wires and take the pump inside to the basement along with the batteries and shower heads after blowing the lines.

No check valve in the foot of the supply line solves the mistery as to why there is no mention made of it anywhere in the literature or videos...that's a big help!

Thanks again folks...other than the hand pump and a few gallons of rv antifreeze I think I'm good.

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Old 09-26-2014, 06:40 PM   #6
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Packed2go,

If you think about the way the city water inlet is constructed, if you use air to blow out the water, then use the water pump to fill the lines with antifreeze, the antifreeze will backflow to the check valve that is located immediately behind the garden hose connection. There's really no reason to "burp" the fitting. Doing so can (not always) dislodge the oring seat causing the check valve to malfunction. It can occasionally be repositioned, but often the check valve has to be replaced to make the system function normally.

Almost always (I've never seen a failure) if you use compressed air to purge the majority of the lines, it will remove nearly all the water from the city water inlet. Then when you pull the inlet fitting on the water pump, gravity will clear the line from the tank to the pump. Attaching the antifreeze draw line and pumping antifreeze into the system will backflow antifreeze into the check valve as it flows throughout the remaining lines as well. As you open each faucet (hot and cold) and see pink flowing, that fixture is protected. Don't forget the outside shower and the toilet. Then pour about 1-2 cups of antifreeze into each trap and you're done inside.

That only leaves the black tank flush. I always use air to rid the line of water, then remove the anti-siphon valve. Gravity will take care of the rest of the water in the two halves of that system.

Don't forget to empty your holding tanks completely. I always leave my valves open, that way water can't accumulate in the lines from the tank to the valve and freeze/crack them. Others leave their valves closed and pour some antifreeze into each tank. I prefer to leave them dry, but either is OK as long as you are sure there's no water in any of the lines.

Good Luck with your winterizing.
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:53 AM   #7
Dave in Va
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
Packed2go,

If you think about the way the city water inlet is constructed, if you use air to blow out the water, then use the water pump to fill the lines with antifreeze, the antifreeze will backflow to the check valve that is located immediately behind the garden hose connection. There's really no reason to "burp" the fitting. Doing so can (not always) dislodge the oring seat causing the check valve to malfunction. It can occasionally be repositioned, but often the check valve has to be replaced to make the system function normally.

Almost always (I've never seen a failure) if you use compressed air to purge the majority of the lines, it will remove nearly all the water from the city water inlet. Then when you pull the inlet fitting on the water pump, gravity will clear the line from the tank to the pump. Attaching the antifreeze draw line and pumping antifreeze into the system will backflow antifreeze into the check valve as it flows throughout the remaining lines as well. As you open each faucet (hot and cold) and see pink flowing, that fixture is protected. Don't forget the outside shower and the toilet. Then pour about 1-2 cups of antifreeze into each trap and you're done inside.

That only leaves the black tank flush. I always use air to rid the line of water, then remove the anti-siphon valve. Gravity will take care of the rest of the water in the two halves of that system.

Don't forget to empty your holding tanks completely. I always leave my valves open, that way water can't accumulate in the lines from the tank to the valve and freeze/crack them. Others leave their valves closed and pour some antifreeze into each tank. I prefer to leave them dry, but either is OK as long as you are sure there's no water in any of the lines.

Good Luck with your winterizing.
Good info here...
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Old 09-28-2014, 09:13 AM   #8
paulmeri
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Newbie here - how many gallons of antifreeze to winterize a 301BHS?

Been reading for a while, thanks to all for some great info.
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Old 09-28-2014, 10:16 AM   #9
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I usually go through 8L (2 gals approx.) by time I pour some antifreeze into the toilet bowl, all the P-traps, and pump some into the FW city water intake and black flush inlet. I don't put any in the FW or HW tanks.

It's not expensive so if you buy too much, any left over can always be used for next year. Better to buy more than have to stop in the middle of winterizing and run out and get another gallon.
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