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Old 09-20-2014, 06:51 PM   #21
Wes Tausend
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Originally Posted by Festus2 View Post
Wes - Thanks for your very thorough and thoughtful explanation. It provides all of us with a better understanding of the effects of moisture, "cold", and RV construction and the effect of each on cold weather camping.

The warning about non-vented catalytic heaters is appreciated and something everyone needs to pay close attention to now that some may be headed out hunting and trying to stay warm.

Thanks for the kind words, Festus.

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Old 09-21-2014, 01:58 PM   #22
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Cold Weather Camping! it is do-able, but challenging at times. I spent two winters "full timing" in the DFW metroplex (2013 & 2014). I learned many things from this forum and from actual experience. The first year was not so bad, but the second was a different story. Although DFW is not the great white north, there were several days below freezing. One stretch even got down to -3 (FW did freeze that night).

My first preparation was to use insulating foam on my fresh water line. That works to about 28. So after the first freezing experience I stripped the foam off, wrapped the hose in aluminum foil and applied heat tape. Applied foam again (salvaging what I could of the old).

Black lines only flushed weekly. Gray lines were closed if the weather was to get below 32. I am a big chicken when it comes to gambling with the waste water lines - I'm deathly afraid of a "poo-nami!"

I purchased and installed a kit to add an additional propane bottle. I wanted to use a 100 gal. bottle, but the park I was staying at said local code prohibited that size. I got a third 30# instead. During the cold periods, I was getting two bottles filled weekly. A couple of times, a bottle would only last 2 days.

I tried to use two electric radiant heaters - failed miserably when the wife turned the hair dryer on. Figured out that one heater in the garage, the fireplace running on thermostat and the furnace set on 76 kept the entire trailer livable.

For a real treat, my wife purchased a heated mattress pad. Far better than an electric blanket.

About the second or third day into cold weather camping, I awoke to find the interior walls sweating. Instant panic. Researched dehumidifiers. Opened the powered vent fan just a little and never looked back.

Wasn't too sure if my fancy radius tinted windows were energy efficient or not. Bought some window film that shrinks with a hairdryer and installed. Don't know if it was worth it or not - but it gave me something to do for an afternoon.

The other big deal was to put a rolled towel in front of both doors.

I would never try something like that without full hookups and knowing that I would not have to leave until the weather was warm enough to travel without winterizing.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:21 PM   #23
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We have a trip planned where the highs are in the mid-50s and the lows between 26 and 29 degrees. It is in a campsite with full hookups. To avoid the water hose freezing over night, we were going to use the fresh water supply tank. I was planning on opening up the cabinets under the sinks to get some warm air flow.

Any other suggestions? I have camped in 30-32 degree lows, but the few degrees here may make all the difference...
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:42 AM   #24
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We have a trip planned where the highs are in the mid-50s and the lows between 26 and 29 degrees. It is in a campsite with full hookups. To avoid the water hose freezing over night, we were going to use the fresh water supply tank. I was planning on opening up the cabinets under the sinks to get some warm air flow.

Any other suggestions? I have camped in 30-32 degree lows, but the few degrees here may make all the difference...
Not knowing for sure what year model your Cougar is, if it's a relatively newer model (with the upgraded Polar Pack), you should be fine down to about 25F (possibly lower) as long as you leave the furnace running. The "heat loss" through the floor registers and that small 2" hot air duct should keep the sub-floor spaces warm enough to prevent any freeze damage. Keep in mind that there is a tremendous heat loss through all the big single pane windows, so don't expect to be "toasty warm" sitting next to one of those "arctic vents" LOL
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:48 AM   #25
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Install some window film on your windows, it makes a world of difference.
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:33 AM   #26
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Hi,

What's everyone's consensus concerning window film and moisture? During the cooler months that I camp, my windows sweat terribly. Does the window film help cut down on this or do they continue to sweat anyway?
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:55 AM   #27
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Hi,

What's everyone's consensus concerning window film and moisture? During the cooler months that I camp, my windows sweat terribly. Does the window film help cut down on this or do they continue to sweat anyway?
The actual glass part of the window won't sweat with film in place, but the adhesive tape that holds the film in place is applied to the aluminum framework. There is no added insulation effect to the aluminum, so the frames continue to sweat. You'll still have some (although much reduced) condensation problems around the window frames, but overall, the reduced heat loss is a significant benefit.

You'll still have to open a vent and crack a window to help control moisture inside the RV, but you won't notice it collecting on the glass. That condensation seems to move to the window frames or cooler parts of the outside walls. You won't notice as much condensation as before the film and your RV will seem to be much warmer, especially around the "big" windows.
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Old 12-10-2014, 10:37 AM   #28
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On our last trip it got down to the 20F overnight. The furnace did a good job keeping everything warm but as said, those window areas were chilly.
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Old 12-11-2014, 10:22 AM   #29
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I haven't camped in our TT in cold weather yet. Are we saying that tinted film applied to the inside of the dark tinted windows will cut down on the condensation?

For summer time heat transfer I am going to install a window covering (can't remember what it's called at the moment) on the outside of the windows to cut down on the heat - and for winter I need to put tinted film on the inside...is that right? Thanks.
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Old 12-11-2014, 10:43 AM   #30
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I haven't camped in our TT in cold weather yet. Are we saying that tinted film applied to the inside of the dark tinted windows will cut down on the condensation?

For summer time heat transfer I am going to install a window covering (can't remember what it's called at the moment) on the outside of the windows to cut down on the heat - and for winter I need to put tinted film on the inside...is that right? Thanks.
NO, the window film you're referring to (I think) is the magnetic cling film that adheres to the glass. (similar to the window tint used on car windows). That is NOT the "storm window" type film that is applied "separate from and about 1" away from the window glass"... The film we are talking about acts as a "storm window", is clear (not tinted) and is applied to the window frame with double sided tape, not placed in contact with the glass. It forms a "dead air space" between the window and the film.

What you're referring to would do nothing to decrease the heat loss through the glass.

Here is one example of what we're discussing: http://www.amazon.com/Frost-King-V73...insulation+kit
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Old 12-11-2014, 11:58 AM   #31
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Gotcha! Thanks John. I know what you're talking about. I belive we did that once upon a time somewhere (may have been in our last RV) and I just forgot about it. Makes much more sense than just putting a film over the window.
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Old 12-11-2014, 02:01 PM   #32
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I started a thread about the window film, if you would like to see a pic of it let me know
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Old 12-11-2014, 09:28 PM   #33
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I did a hunting trip in Colorado in November. Considered dry camping but found a campground with full hookups about 20 miles from my hunting unit and decided to camp there instead of taking a chance on a big storm dumping on me up some higher mountain two track. I was prepared to winterize but decided to hold off unless minus 0'F was predicted.
It was unseasonably mild weather on arrival, daytime mid 50's, nights generally down to teens low 20's.
Filled FW tank to half and stored my FW hose.
Saw 6'F to 12'F many nights with highs just above freezing.
Thermostat set at 66-68' at night 55' days and used about 1 to 1 1/2 tanks of propane every 4 days. Two days of snow on trailer at one point with highs at 32 to 36F. Over the course of two weeks and many nights well below freezing the trailer performed very well.

I don't know how it would be towing with water in my FW tank and pipes in freezing weather and furnace off, or continuous freezing temps but this is the second time I have camped in the 6'F to 12'F range (Grand Canyon last Spring) and have not had any issues.
I was in a reasonable sheltered campsite close to a bluff but had winds 30/40 a couple of days. I took boat showers and avoided boiling water other than in a tea kettle and had no issues with condensation.

I made a threaded tube from a water pressure regulator and air quip fittings to screw into my FW fill and carried an air bottle set at 40# to blow the system down before adding RV antifreeze. I used that in Utah when the Polar vortex passed through.
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Old 12-25-2014, 01:46 PM   #34
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well, hard to answer that question, but I can tell you it gets darn cold during elk season here in eastern Oregon
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Old 12-26-2014, 06:26 PM   #35
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I have the double pane gas filled windows with my polar package. I wonder how they are going to be on those cold nights. Looking forward to see how the whole trailer works. It is winterized now. But if you camp late into the season right u till the campgrounds close. You can get some cold nights. I also might try sleeping in it in the driveway. No hookups just the heat. Will see what the family thinks.
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Old 12-31-2014, 10:48 AM   #36
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17 degrees and windy so I don't know what the wind chill was.
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