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Old 02-16-2014, 08:02 AM   #21
JRTJH
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In generators, bigger is not always better. Consider this: A 3500 watt sustained (continuous) output generator produces 30.3 amps of power continuously. If the RV shore power is set up as a 30 amp system, then buying a generator larger than that is "larger than needed" and buying gasoline (or propane) to power the larger generator is not going to provide any "more power" than the circuit breakers in the RV will allow into the system.

Now, don't confuse maximum "surge power" with "continuous power" output. To buy a 3500 watt "surge" generator will not provide the sustained 30 amps to the RV.

Most generators are rated with 2 power levels. As an example, the Champion is rated at 4000 watts "surge" and 3500 watts "continuous" power output. It will provide all the power a 30 amp RV can consume (given the trailer circuit breakers function normally).

I suppose another way to explain it is, "with a 3500 watt continuous power generator, you can run everything in your RV that you can run when connected to shore power. It doesn't matter where the 30 amps comes from, shore power cord or generator, 30 amps is 30 amps. Buying a generator that produces more than that is pouring gasoline into a bigger system than necessary. Buying a larger generator (to have reserve power) means you'll be lifting and packing a heavier generator and pouring gasoline into it more often because it consumes more gas to operate.

An inverter generator is usually more economical to operate because it has an "economy mode" in which the engine powers down until the generator load requires more power (more gasoline). This makes them somewhat quieter when operating at less than full load. They do, however, cost quite a bit more than a conventional generator.

I'm not attempting to refute any previous comments, just trying to clarify that a generator rated to provide 30 amps of continuous power will provide the same 120VAC input to a 30 amp RV system as a 30 Amp 120VAC power pole in a campground will provide. The generator is "rated to provide that on a continuous basis" the same as the campground shore power connection is rated to provide that on a "continuous basis". Any "extra" power would be limited by the circuit breakers in the power pole, the generator and the RV input breaker.
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:38 AM   #22
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Keep in mind the noise level to not offend your camping neighbors.
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:17 PM   #23
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I use a Yamaha 2400 watt invertor generator. Works great here in BC where I camp in the trees and the rooftop ac isn't needed.
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:38 PM   #24
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Honda

I know they aren't cheap, but I tend to look at how long I am going to own something when I consider the price. If it may very well be the only one I ever buy, I take that into consideration. If nothing else, thinking about how it averages out over a ten year period helps me justify bigger purchases - in this case a couple of hundred dollars a year. That being said, a few years back I bought two Honda 2000s. The have a parallel hookup that gives you 4000 watts when connected. And you can actually pick them up as they are no where near as heavy as a 3000 or 4000.
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Old 02-16-2014, 02:15 PM   #25
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Champion 3500/4000 $350 shipped



Champion 3100 Inverter $950 shipped

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Old 02-16-2014, 07:18 PM   #26
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Thank you for all the input.


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Old 02-16-2014, 07:39 PM   #27
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Boliy for me as well. It's a 3600 watter and runs my 15kw a/c on my Alpine just fine. AND it's almost as quiet as the Honda 3000!! I'd never need any more than this for myself. Also got the remote start/stop option. :-)
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:20 PM   #28
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Yamaha EF2600, it worked great tonight to power the trailer I was very impressed considering it was the first time I used it.
I use it on job sites and at the cabin and it's never failed once and it's very quite.
I have another monster that I lite up the house with tonight and there's a ton of lights in and around the house and it never has a problem.
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Old 02-17-2014, 04:20 PM   #29
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Generator - Quiet is Better

I have a Honda 3000i and the Honda 6500i (heavy) generator. Both are super-quiet.

I have a Montana High Country 5er (50 amps) with one AC.

The 6500i carries the entire camper with no trouble - including the AC; while the 3000i carries the entire camper minus the AC.

Over the life of the generators, the absence of noise will be worth the investment.

PS: Also, I use both of them as backup power for the house during bad weather - snow/ice storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:43 PM   #30
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I went with the Hondas: 2000i plus 2000i companion with parallel cables. They are currently en route, expected this Wednesday.


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Old 02-17-2014, 05:47 PM   #31
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I have a champion 3500 watt. like posted earlier it runs everything, I have about 250 hours and still going strong.
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Old 02-18-2014, 07:37 AM   #32
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No, most 50 amp do not have two AC units. I plug my 50 amp cord right into my E3000IS Honda with an adapter and all works great. We ordered it with the wireless remote start and really enjoy it. So much more quiet than the farm and consrtuction type units and the low fuel use is unbelieveable. A decision we will never regrett.
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Old 02-18-2014, 11:18 AM   #33
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Basically RVs use 2 types of electrical systems. 110v's AC like in your house. And 12v DC like in your car. The 110v outlets in your RV will supply power to your household appliances and TVs etc. This system only works when you plug the trailers or motorhome shore cord into an outlet at the campground or at your house. These cords can be 30 amp or 50 amps depending on the amperage draw of your RV. 30 amp is the average RV. This allows the use of the roof air conditioning, microwave oven, electrical outlets, refrigerator, etc. You must be aware of how many amps each appliance is drawing. An air conditioner draws about 16 amps. A microwave draws about 13 amps. Converter draws 4 to 6. Add up each item that you have running at the same time including TV's, coffee makers. To see what your amperage draw would be. Larger trailers and motorhomes use 50 amp systems so they can use more/ larger appliances. Like washers and dryers, ice makers, second air conditioners, electric water heaters. [/B]

http://www.rvdirectbuffalo.com/index...ctricalsystems

Now onto real life.
50 amps will generally get you things like a second AC ready, washer/dryer hookups. They can all be run on one 50 amp circuit. 30 amps limits you to running one AC, maybe a washer/dryer at the same time. As long as you turn the refer and water heater to gas too.
.......
I wish our last TT had 50 amps, then we could make coffee and run the micro or fireplace, or both the micro and the fireplace, LOL. our friends new TT has 50 amps and 2 AC units (its a 34' TT)
I guess it depends on what all you have that runs off the electric.

if your at a campground with 30 amp as we so often are then you will have to be more selective in what you use. our camper is 50 amps and when we do get a 30 amp site we are just more aware of what we use. when we camp in hot weather I try to book a 50 amp site.

http://forums.woodalls.com/index.cfm...d/27493071.cfm

And I would love to see a 4K watt that puts out 30 amps lol, considering my 3.500 only does 15 amps, with a 20 amp surge.
But hey, it's the internet, where everyone is an expert and claims abound.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:10 PM   #34
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Fulltimer,

There are several models of the Champion 4000watt (3500watt continuous) generator. The one we have has a 30 amp RV plug and a 30 amp circuit breaker. We have operated the A/C, water heater, refrigerator and the microwave without problems. There are several other models of generators out there that produce 30 amps. There may be "internet scams" about generators, but the fact is, (as I remember) that total watts divided by voltage equals amperage. So, 3500 / 115 = 30.43 amps. That's the continuous power output BTW.

Your wishes for a generator are available, in fact, there's a picture of one model on the previous page of this thread.... Cost at CW right now on sale is $319. Tractor Supply has the same generator for $329 regular price, the last time it was on sale, it was $279.
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Old 02-18-2014, 07:57 PM   #35
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This past summer the dw and I went on a 4000 mile trip and some of the nightly stops were not in campgrounds but in rest areas. So I went on crags list looking for a generator to at least run our ac during the hot nights. I was originally looking for a Honda or Yamaha but realized that we hardly ever are without power except for this trip and probably others when we just stay in a rest area so I broadened my search and found a 4000 peak 3500 continuous champion generator.

It is now 8 years old and performed flawlessly the whole trip running the ac all night on one tank. It does have the 30 amp rv plug in it so no adapter needed. Best of all it only cost me 100 bucks. Would I use it in a camping environment with other campers? Probably not unless they were not close to me as it is noticeably louder than a Honda or the likes but for a rest area with semi's running all the time it just blended in.

The only time I might use it in a campground is during the day is for a recharge and not use it at all at night. Since it gets pretty cool at night where we camp windows will suffice.

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Old 02-19-2014, 03:27 AM   #36
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No, most 50 amp do not have two AC units......
I suspect this is largely a regional thing. Around here, you won't find a 50 amp RV large enough for 2 ACs that doesn't have 2 ACs installed.

However that being said, there's no reason you can plug ANY RV (20 amp, 30 amp, or 50 amp) into any outlet (15-20/30/50) with the appropriate adaptors... As long as the user manages what they attempt to draw from the source.
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Old 02-19-2014, 03:37 AM   #37
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....And I would love to see a 4K watt that puts out 30 amps lol, considering my 3.500 only does 15 amps, with a 20 amp surge.
But hey, it's the internet, where everyone is an expert and claims abound.
I'm not sure I understand the above statement. Perhaps it's in the way the breakers/outlets are wired on the generator. Otherwise why wouldn't a 3500 put out more than 15 amps running (20 amp surge)?

My Yamaha 2800 is rated (by Yamaha) for 24 amp surge and 21 amp running. However, to go above 20 amps, I have to use the 30 amp twistlock outlet as opposed to the traditional household outlet.

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Old 02-19-2014, 04:09 PM   #38
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Approaching this from a completely logical angle. Amps vs needed wattage. First, just because a gennie has a 30 plug that doesn't mean it will put out 30 amps as mentioned above. I was stressing 4K watts would NOT be enough to run it "all" as the OP originally stated. But checking the Honda specs, the two he chose wisely, put out enough to pretty much do that, when COMBINED. I have always thought Honda's were underrated for output. Notice the amps outage, very good for 2000 watts.
Now just for grins, I did the Honda site calculator for wattage for RV's. Notice The HW heater, converter, any 110 volt lighting is NOT included. And yes trailers have some 110 lighting.
http://powerequipment.honda.com/gene...age-calculator



http://powerequipment.honda.com/gene...models/eu2000i

http://postimg.org/image/3s640v65n/

The bottom line is this: You have to do the wattage calcs, and the research on the gennies. Not any 4000 watt will carry the same loads. Some may be underrated, some may be over. And as far as 50 amp trailer having two ac's, I'm sure the manufacture didn't add the extra capacity for grins and added cost of manufacturing. I suspect they added 50 amps to give extra headroom and/ or the possibility of adding a second ac, which is not unusual.

I think I have made my point, have fun debating it.
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Old 02-19-2014, 06:26 PM   #39
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Just to clarify.... At no point does the OP say he/she wants a generator to "run it all". He wants something "for backup only". A nice quiet inverter 3-3.5kw should suit him/her just fine.
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Old 02-19-2014, 06:33 PM   #40
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I think I have made my point, have fun debating it.
I'm not sure exactly what you point is and what we should be debating?
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