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Old 11-28-2023, 04:03 AM   #1
Pthornburg10
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Condensation drip from front window frame

I have a 2023 Cougar 25rds with the front window. Over the last few days I've noticed a drip in the top right corner of the frame. This only happens at night. The temperatures have been highs in the 50s and lows in the 30s. I'm assuming this is condensation since this hasn't happened when it's rained. I've attached 2 photos for reference. One shows the entire window and the other is of the top right corner of the frame where the drip is taking place. Any suggestions on what could be causing this and how I can fix it.
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Old 11-28-2023, 11:55 AM   #2
dutchmensport
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Air flow .... set up a fan and keep the air circulating inside your camper. Crack a window so fresh air in ..... old air out. Air circulation is the only way, and maybe a dehumidifier.
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Old 11-28-2023, 04:47 PM   #3
GlasNav
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We have the same unit, and that condenser they call a front window is a problem in the winter.
Early this year / last winter we had to go weatherbound when that nasty multi-day ice storm event clobbered Texas and Arkansas, etc. We hunkered down in Toad Suck COE thru the storm, the exterior of the unit was encased in ice and snow. The front window laughed at the foam insert I had made for winter camping and the bottom of window frame became a swimming pool, the window frame both upper and lower began dripping ice water due to capillary attraction directly onto our heads, wasn't fun. Regularly draining the lower frame, and rigging some towels to wick away the condensate from the upper portion of the window frame.
I'm aware that someone on this forum made a full size insulated plug to go into the window frame during winter months.
My neighbor has a Rockwood, no fancy window in the front, no condensation. Sometimes glitz isn't the best.
I plan on fabricating a plug that completely seals the front window before we commence winter camping next month.
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Old 11-28-2023, 05:51 PM   #4
sourdough
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There are different ways to try to fight condensation after it happens....and it does happen a lot. We carry a dehumidifier everywhere we go - compressor type. I don't like too much humidity (desert rat) and don't like condensation in my RV. Don't know about how much help that will be with a front window (glass) but it sure shuts down the condensation on our side and back windows.
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Old 11-29-2023, 04:16 AM   #5
Pthornburg10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlasNav View Post
We have the same unit, and that condenser they call a front window is a problem in the winter.
Early this year / last winter we had to go weatherbound when that nasty multi-day ice storm event clobbered Texas and Arkansas, etc. We hunkered down in Toad Suck COE thru the storm, the exterior of the unit was encased in ice and snow. The front window laughed at the foam insert I had made for winter camping and the bottom of window frame became a swimming pool, the window frame both upper and lower began dripping ice water due to capillary attraction directly onto our heads, wasn't fun. Regularly draining the lower frame, and rigging some towels to wick away the condensate from the upper portion of the window frame.
I'm aware that someone on this forum made a full size insulated plug to go into the window frame during winter months.
My neighbor has a Rockwood, no fancy window in the front, no condensation. Sometimes glitz isn't the best.
I plan on fabricating a plug that completely seals the front window before we commence winter camping next month.
This is exactly what's happening to us minus the pool of water. Just annoying drip. I removed the frame and noticed the cavity (gap) that's located behind the frame. This is where the water is coming from. I'm thinking of inserting some kind of open or closed cell gasket. I also realized this is where much of the cold air is coming from.
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Old 12-30-2023, 11:07 PM   #6
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Good morning. Did you ever come up with a solution for the window condensation?
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Old 12-31-2023, 01:25 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Pthornburg10 View Post
Good morning. Did you ever come up with a solution for the window condensation?
I've removed the inside window frame, and the roller shade. Presently lining the window area inside the metal frame with two layers of 2" foil faced insulation and sealing the area with visqueen and duct tape. I'm inserting a section of paneling similar to the existing paneling into the inner wood window frame.
So instead of a seasonal "plug" I'm just taking the window out of the equation.
The reason for reusing the wood frame is that the metal frame for the glass window protrudes into the living area and I didn't want to build additional framing to support new paneling between the vertical side cabinets.

The window over the bed is a huge condenser plate, your breath as well as kitchen and bath vapors condense on the window and makes a mess during winter camping.
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Old 12-31-2023, 01:51 PM   #8
Pthornburg10
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I took the frame down and tried placing gasket material inside the gap that goes all the way around. It didn't solve the problem. I'm now thinking of using flexseal tape over the opening all the way around and see what happens. Can you send me photos of what yours looks like? Has it worked?
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Old 02-06-2024, 08:47 PM   #9
AshevilleHippie
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“My neighbor has a Rockwood, no fancy window in the front, no condensation. Sometimes glitz isn't the best.
I plan on fabricating a plug that completely seals the front window before we commence winter camping next month.”

I hate to break it to you but it has nothing to do with your particular model of RV . They all do this . Why? First and foremost, if it’s a camper trailer or average motorhome, anything behind the driver and passenger seats is going to be single pane glass. All of these units are very, very poorly insulated. Now putting these two things together what you have is conensation being produced on the inside from humidity which comes from the outside and inside (humans and animals breathing, cooking, showering, etc. When temperatures drop at night it’s basic science just like dew on your front lawn in fall and spring. The warm air on the inside of your unit is trying to warm up the window and on the other side, the cool air is trying to make it cold. Hence, condensation. And in very basic terms, condensation is the transformation of vapor to liquid. The humidity in the air equals condensation (water) on the glass window. I have had countless RVs and travel trailers, and this has been an issue in every single one regardless of cost, age, model, or construction . Right now I am using a dehumidifier in mine and while that works swimmingly, my sinuses are killing me from the dry air . So, no matter what you do, you’re gonna have this issue. The best thing you can do is purchase a small dehumidifier, insure plenty of airflow, and keep porous /absorbant materials away from windows. In other words, nothing made from particleboard, no blankets, mattresses, and the like. Also, while it may seem a good idea to get out the caulk gun, just remember you’re locking moisture in just as much as you’re trying to lock it out —-don’t do it.
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Old 02-07-2024, 05:13 AM   #10
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AshevilleHippie: I understand your explanation and fully agree. However, we aren't newbies to Travel Trailers or a Class A as well. The issue with the fancy front window of this particular model of trailer is that it takes up most of the interior directly above the bed. With the metal frame that sets in over four inches until reaching the paneling. Nothing like a giant condenser plate directly over your head!
I have solved the problem, similarly to another owner that fabricated a seasonal plug that fills the entire frame. I purchased a sheet of paneling that is similar to the interior of the bedroom, and a small roll of fiberglass insulation. Cut the paneling to match what is the front side of the fancy well made wooden window frame, and attached it permanently. Then filled the window cavity with fiberglass insulation, taping it in place. Followed by a couple of layers of 6mil visqueen plastic sheeting that overlapped the entire window area, secured that and then inserted and attached the wooden window frame. No more condensation, and the bedroom is considerably more comfortable.
The only con is the loss of the window view which was only used at campsites that had something to view!
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Old 02-07-2024, 05:17 AM   #11
Pthornburg10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlasNav View Post
AshevilleHippie: I understand your explanation and fully agree. However, we aren't newbies to Travel Trailers or a Class A as well. The issue with the fancy front window of this particular model of trailer is that it takes up most of the interior directly above the bed. With the metal frame that sets in over four inches until reaching the paneling. Nothing like a giant condenser plate directly over your head!
I have solved the problem, similarly to another owner that fabricated a seasonal plug that fills the entire frame. I purchased a sheet of paneling that is similar to the interior of the bedroom, and a small roll of fiberglass insulation. Cut the paneling to match what is the front side of the fancy well made wooden window frame, and attached it permanently. Then filled the window cavity with fiberglass insulation, taping it in place. Followed by a couple of layers of 6mil visqueen plastic sheeting that overlapped the entire window area, secured that and then inserted and attached the wooden window frame. No more condensation, and the bedroom is considerably more comfortable.
The only con is the loss of the window view which was only used at campsites that had something to view!
Did you happen to make a video of your solution or take photos? I'd love to see exactly what you did.
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Old 02-07-2024, 09:44 AM   #12
GlasNav
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Originally Posted by Pthornburg10 View Post
Did you happen to make a video of your solution or take photos? I'd love to see exactly what you did.
I was going to do a step by step capture of the process. However, once I started stuffing the insulation in, I came to the realization that both hands were needed and I had to enlist my wife to come out and lend a hand as well. Working from the bed and against the inward angle of the trailer is a pain in the butt, can't stand in that area, but we accomplished what we set out to do!

The dimensions of the wooden window frame were even, the frame is a well made piece of joiner work (how did that happen).

The outer edge of the frame is square cut to the portion that sets into the metal window frame and is too shallow of a relief to be able to trace for the cut. Had to measure, layout and cut the rectangle then radius the corners.

The insulation I selected was something like R7 with a foil backing, I applied two layers of this with the foil towards the window. Since the window is tinted, you can't see from the outside that the window has been blocked off, in other words, it doesn't appear as a junky shade tree application.

The plastic sheeting used was some 6 mil garden ground cover plastic sheeting, and instead of just apply one layer, the material was folded and once unfolded enough to cover the entire work area with plenty of overhang, I only taped the top edge and let the remainder hang so that there was slack for the sheeting to conform to the shape of the forward side of the now solid wooden window frame. After the frame was reattached and snug against the existing paneling, I trimmed the plastic sheeting from the sides and bottom edge, the extra layers are acting as a gasket.
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