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Old 08-12-2019, 09:17 AM   #1
Jacksonrc
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Staying warm

Hey all,

I’m looking at my various options for heating this winter. I live in my trailer full time, I charge up my batteries with a generator every day since there is no hydro hooked up her until next spring. Propane is just plain expensive where I live too. $50 to fill a 30lbs tank.

Last winter was just brutal on my pocket book running my propane furnace all the time. Yes, I have had my trailer skirted.

I’ve been leaning towards a 12V diesel heater......but have also thought about having a roof top heat pump installed that I could run only when needed via the generator......in both cases, I could still use my furnace to supplement any other heating option I go with.

So, does anyone have any suggestions, thoughts, or ideas on the matter?
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Old 08-12-2019, 03:09 PM   #2
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You might find that renting/leasing a larger "bulk propane tank" (100 gallons or even larger) is cheaper to fill and lasts a lot longer than the 30 pound (7 gallon) tanks that most of us have.

Usually a bulk tank is serviced by a propane distribution company and they also rent/set the tank on your property. Around here, it's around half the price of using 20 or 30 pound tanks.
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Old 08-12-2019, 04:25 PM   #3
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As John mentioned above, the larger capacity tanks might be an option. Where we winter some of the full timers have motorhomes that apparently have large tanks and the local LP company sends a truck out to fill them in the winter. I don't know if they would do that for a single individual but if there are others around you it might be an option.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:34 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
You might find that renting/leasing a larger "bulk propane tank" (100 gallons or even larger) is cheaper to fill and lasts a lot longer than the 30 pound (7 gallon) tanks that most of us have.

Usually a bulk tank is serviced by a propane distribution company and they also rent/set the tank on your property. Around here, it's around half the price of using 20 or 30 pound tanks.
There is one bulk supplier on the island. Let’s just say (possibly hypothetically) that there is a personal beef between myself and the owner/operator of this company. So, bulk propane is a bit of an issue too. Lol

What are your thoughts on alternatives?
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:52 PM   #5
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Resolve the "beef" ?????

If the temps are going to be below freezing for any length of time, you need heat below the floor. That means running the furnace (propane consumption) or converting the furnace to also operate on electricity. There is an "add on electrical system" for RV furnaces. While it's likely to mean that you'll also need to convert to 50 amp shore power capability, there is a 30 amp system that can provide somewhere around 6200 BTU at the furnace (most 1500 watt "stand alone electric floor heaters are around 5600 BTU) which, in turn, will be directed to the ductwork which includes the "sub floor area", which will protect your holding tanks during extremely cold weather. https://www.rvcomfortsystems.com/
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:23 PM   #6
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I use wave 8 catalytic heater there good for above freezing. Mine is built in under the sink and compression connected to the oven .
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:28 PM   #7
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Put in a woodstove?
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Old 08-13-2019, 07:57 AM   #8
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Put in a woodstove?
The company that provides my insurance wonít allow a wood stove. Unfortuately.

Iíll have a look at these wave heaters....donít know much about them.
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Old 11-09-2019, 04:59 AM   #9
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https://www.homedepot.com/b/Heating-...5yc1vZaz3Zc4m1

The mini split heat and air conditioner is affordable and only user 110 amps and might be your best bet. We have one in a room addition and it works great for both heat and air.
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:23 PM   #10
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I use this little kerosene heater in a workshop and it really does a great job of keeping me warm in a shed that is not insulated or heated. I bet indoors the size of a trailer it would do great. A one gallon tank lasts me all day.



https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002JPRKYI...v_ov_lig_dp_it


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Old 02-12-2020, 07:43 PM   #11
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I wouldnít use a heater that requires a steady supply of oxygen. The RV furnace uses outside air in the combustion chamber and exhausts dangerous gases out side. IMO your asking for a trip to St. Peterís gate if you use it without an open window.
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:40 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by On the Job View Post
I use this little kerosene heater in a workshop and it really does a great job of keeping me warm in a shed that is not insulated or heated. I bet indoors the size of a trailer it would do great. A one gallon tank lasts me all day.



https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002JPRKYI...v_ov_lig_dp_it



When I was stationed in Korea, this and charcoal fire pits were the typical "home heating systems". Every year there were hundreds of families that died from carbon monoxide poisoning while using this type of heater. Even with a "mechanical safety device" that shuts off the heater if CO levels rise, do you want to trust your life to such a device?

In a small area like an RV, there's limited oxygen and it's easy for CO levels to rise to dangerous concentrations. I wouldn't suggest using any kerosene heater in a closed area, especially for "overnight use". That's a very RISKY way to go to sleep and not wake up.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:09 AM   #13
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1. I have only and would only use this as supplemental heat during the day when I was there working, going in and out, etc to give the propane furnace (and propane levels) a break.

2. I would never use this or ANY other external heat source, be it kerosene, electric, firewood, pellet, etc while I was sleeping or when I was not there to monitor it. I would assume that is a given? Does anyone here trust to have even an electric heater plugged into an outlet while they don't have an eye on it, let alone sleep soundly? Not me. Let the furnace do it's job when you aren't there or sleeping.

3. Check your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. I just replaced mine that was expired - more than 10 years old. I keep 3 fire extinguishers inside and one outside of the RV - and not the tiny ones but 4 pounders.

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When I was stationed in Korea, this and charcoal fire pits were the typical "home heating systems". Every year there were hundreds of families that died from carbon monoxide poisoning while using this type of heater. Even with a "mechanical safety device" that shuts off the heater if CO levels rise, do you want to trust your life to such a device?

In a small area like an RV, there's limited oxygen and it's easy for CO levels to rise to dangerous concentrations. I wouldn't suggest using any kerosene heater in a closed area, especially for "overnight use". That's a very RISKY way to go to sleep and not wake up.
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Old 02-13-2020, 12:44 PM   #14
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I use oil filled radiators and sleep like a baby.
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Old 02-13-2020, 01:50 PM   #15
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I use oil filled radiators and sleep like a baby.
Whatever youíre comfortable with I guess.

https://www.expertinstitute.com/resources/case-studies/space-heater-fire-kills-2-children/


https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.fox29.com/news/sheriffs-deputy-sues-manufacturers-after-sons-killed-in-schwenksville-house-fire.amp


https://www.nola.com/news/article_4308ac1e-02c6-585e-b9c2-de32da5760e5.html


https://www.universalhub.com/2011/family-wellesley-woman-who-died-fire-sues-space-he
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Old 02-13-2020, 02:17 PM   #16
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I grew up in an antique house heated by two kerosene stoves (the upstairs, where the bedrooms were, got only whatever heat wafted up). They were well and truly chimneyed. I don't miss the chore of traipsing to the cold basement every night to fill up two smelly jug tanks. Just the odor gives me unwelcome flashbacks.
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Old 02-13-2020, 03:51 PM   #17
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I would suggest that modern electric heaters (oil and resistance) are every bit as safe, unattended, as the latest RV propane furnace. Yes, Google will successfully provide fodder for an opposing opinion.
Might I ask where an individual would mount three large fire extinguishers inside an RV? If you tell me that one will be in the children's sleeping area you won't stand a chance in this discussion.
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Old 02-13-2020, 05:54 PM   #18
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I would suggest that modern electric heaters (oil and resistance) are every bit as safe, unattended, as the latest RV propane furnace. Yes, Google will successfully provide fodder for an opposing opinion.
Might I ask where an individual would mount three large fire extinguishers inside an RV? If you tell me that one will be in the children's sleeping area you won't stand a chance in this discussion.

1. Master bedroom on the floor next to my side of the bed
2. Corner next to the settee far side between the main area and bunkhouse
3. Bunkhouse room corner between door and electrical panel.

4. Outside next to the steps go into the unit.


Both my boys, ages 16 and 9, have actually discharged a practice extinguisher at our local volunteer fire department and had a blast doing it. We have practiced evacuation exits from the RV. They know where the extinguisher is in their room, the one in main area and the one outside the door. They will stand a chance.



What makes you think they won't and tell me why I won't stand a chance in this discussion? I've seen what fire does first hand and how fast it does it, especially when you're not prepared. I'm doing my best that it doesn't happen to me or my family.


These extinguishers aren't as big as you make them out to be. They are good choice for an RV or a vehicle. I have one on my UTV as well. Way better than the tiny 5 second extinguishers that came with the unit. These will go 15+ seconds continuous use.



What's your plan? Hope you wake up?




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Old 02-13-2020, 06:24 PM   #19
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I'm thinking we may be moving off into the "safety preparedness" arena vs staying warm. Yes, these threads ebb and flow, and "what have you done to mitigate fire dangers" sort of dovetails into "staying warm" maybe we want to just discuss "staying warm" as the OP questioned.

I have no problem with any fire suppression device an owner may want; 4lb, the little bottles that come inside, a bottle of water etc. That is up to them. Having done a stint with a volunteer fire dept., watched fires etc., I understand the devastation they can cause and the unbelievable quickness with which they can spread.

I owned 4 homes ( now down to 2 and soon to be 1). I had 4 lb. units in them all, somewhere for use. I own one RV; I keep 2 of the smaller units in it. That's me, my choice. I believe I sleep light enough (thanks previous life) , my snooter is good enough and pup is vigilant enough that I don't need 2 4 pounders sitting in such a confined space; I have zero concern about saving the RV....just us.

All to say that we all have our thoughts on what is and what isn't an appropriate way to not only heat a space but mitigate any possible ramifications of it. They are opinions; personal preferences; NOT my way is better than yours or PROVE to me that your way is better than mine.....we're just talking about a good way to stay warm....
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Old 02-13-2020, 06:33 PM   #20
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This is a very important point. Children should be taught to evacuate an RV, NOT stay and fight a fire. Danny, I know where you're coming from, and this will be the last of my posts concerning the subjects. But firefighting experts will insist that children AND adults need to be removed from the RV, not hang around and fight the fire. I'm done.
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