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Old 02-10-2020, 05:23 AM   #1
jeff57
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Replace tires or both rims and tires?

Good morning forum members,
I would like to ask you folks for some feedback, insights, info, etc. about replacing the tires on my camper.
Currently my camper has ST205/75R14C original/stock tires on it, which I think are undersized. We purchased the camper new in Sept. 2016, date code on tires is 2016 (not sure off hand what week), the GVWR of my camper is 7500. I am going to replace the tires this spring but am wondering if I should just replace the tires with LRD or go with new rims and tires for even more "margin". I don't intend to carry more items in the camper, just would like to feel more comfortable with the tires and their capacity. I also have a TPMS.
If I go with new rims and tires, would it be better to move up to 15" rims or stay with 14"? There is plenty of room for the 15" rims.
Our camper is always on the move during camping season (not at a seasonal campground), probably putting on 3500+ miles each year.
Any thoughts or other things that I should consider?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 02-10-2020, 06:11 AM   #2
chuckster57
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My thought: if the rims havenít failed and they are rated for a LRD, just put tires on it.
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Old 02-10-2020, 06:53 AM   #3
Northofu1
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Hi Jeff,
I had the 2015 version of your trailer, i replaced my tires on the factory alloy rims last spring with Carlisle radial trail hd LRD. Rims will work just fine. I personally would not have switched to 15's. It towed beautifully.
I was going to replace springs and upgrade to heavy duty shackles and wet bolts this spring, but the trailer wanted it done last August as a spring snapped in half .
If you have the mono leaf springs on the wide axle stance, I would invest in two springs. I had a devil of a time trying to find them locally in Dayton Ohio, had to have them shipped from manufacturer to keystone to dealer. 10 days in Dayton was not my first choice of vacation.
Towed beautifully after that.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:15 AM   #4
Ken / Claudia
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Replace the rims if you want to spend the money on others of a different style. Will they be better, I highly doubt it just different. As long as the current rims are made for higher psi. Check the wheel if in doubt. Upgrading a load range buys you more of a safety margin in the heavier load rating if you inflate the tires to their max listed on the sidewall. Your trailer still has the same GVWR. I did the same on work boats trailers, 3 of my own boat trailers and 2 TTs. Some say it might or will make the trailer ride rougher. How would someone test that or prove it? and would it really matter.
When I changed the current RV tires from D at 65 psi to E at 80 psi. I drove the same 800 mile trip and cannot say I ever noted a thing different about how it tracked, bounced or pulled over the same freeway.
Now if your talking about running 65 psi in a TV and going to 80 psi. You will feel the difference, but thats a pickup not a RV. Apples to oranges.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:32 AM   #5
flybouy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff57 View Post
Good morning forum members,
I would like to ask you folks for some feedback, insights, info, etc. about replacing the tires on my camper.
Currently my camper has ST205/75R14C original/stock tires on it, which I think are undersized. We purchased the camper new in Sept. 2016, date code on tires is 2016 (not sure off hand what week), the GVWR of my camper is 7500. I am going to replace the tires this spring but am wondering if I should just replace the tires with LRD or go with new rims and tires for even more "margin". I don't intend to carry more items in the camper, just would like to feel more comfortable with the tires and their capacity. I also have a TPMS.
If I go with new rims and tires, would it be better to move up to 15" rims or stay with 14"? There is plenty of room for the 15" rims.
Our camper is always on the move during camping season (not at a seasonal campground), probably putting on 3500+ miles each year.
Any thoughts or other things that I should consider?

Thanks in advance!
Jeff the date code of 2016 would be the 20 th week of 2016. Or early May, 2016.

Having "enough room" for larger tires/rims would take some observing and measuring. How much room is available when the suspension is fully articulated, etc.

My opinion, replace the current tires with the same size but increase the load range if the rims can take the increased psi (that should be marked on the back of the rim). The Carlisle have a good reputation and are reasonably priced. Have them install bolt in metal valve stems (a very small added cost) and have them balanced.

JMHO
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:19 PM   #6
FlyingAroundRV
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Our Outback 272UFL has the same size tires as your unit. Last year I swapped out the China bombs for some Good Year Endurances. The GY tires are an LRD spec. We did 8,000 miles on them last year and they went just fine.
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Old 02-10-2020, 07:12 PM   #7
CWtheMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff57 View Post
Good morning forum members,
I would like to ask you folks for some feedback, insights, info, etc. about replacing the tires on my camper.
Currently my camper has ST205/75R14C original/stock tires on it, which I think are undersized. We purchased the camper new in Sept. 2016, date code on tires is 2016 (not sure off hand what week), the GVWR of my camper is 7500. I am going to replace the tires this spring but am wondering if I should just replace the tires with LRD or go with new rims and tires for even more "margin". I don't intend to carry more items in the camper, just would like to feel more comfortable with the tires and their capacity. I also have a TPMS.
If I go with new rims and tires, would it be better to move up to 15" rims or stay with 14"? There is plenty of room for the 15" rims.
Our camper is always on the move during camping season (not at a seasonal campground), probably putting on 3500+ miles each year.
Any thoughts or other things that I should consider?

Thanks in advance!
Your current tires do not conform to the RVIA recommended load capacity reserves. Therefore, an upgrade on their load capacity from LRC to LRD is recommended.

More and more of the ST tire manufacturers are building that tire with a LRD load capacity. When a tire designated size has more than one load range capacity the vehicle manufacturer will usually install wheels with a capacity to support all tire load range capacities.

Your trailer was equipped with tires that are deemed appropriate. The load range C and D tires both provide the same load capacity at 50 PSI. The LRD allows more inflation pressure to provide more load capacity. So you would then have the option to increase your tire cold inflation pressures somewhere between 50 & 65 PSI cold to gain a more favorable load capacity to conform to the 10% load capacity reserves recommended by RVIA.
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Old 02-11-2020, 12:25 PM   #8
jeff57
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Thanks for all of great info guys-much appreciated!!
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Old 02-14-2020, 01:53 PM   #9
cavediver
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I have the same trailer. I replaced the c's with D's. Luckily I found a set of Goodyear endurance load range D with rims, that were only 4 months old by the date code. For the price of the tires alone.
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Old 02-17-2020, 03:38 PM   #10
skids
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My 2019 Bullet 248RKS has Rainier ST 205 75R14 Load Range D 105/101M Single 2040 lbs @ 65psi, dual 1820 @ 65 psi (NAp). M is for 81mph max.

OK, I really don't want to replace brand new tires when we haven't taken the camper out yet. We bought it late fall of 2019. But I question if I really should...

So I am wondering if these are "china bombs" or if Rainiers have improved tires for their reputation. Note that these are load range D instead of C that were installed on 3500 lb axles in 2014. My Bullet is something like 6500 lb GVWR and has two axles. My tire brand indicates that tires were made late 2018. Also, I question if rated loading for single at 2040 lbs @ 65psi and dual 1820 @ 65psi makes sense?
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Old 02-17-2020, 04:36 PM   #11
Northofu1
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My sold bullet gvwr 7500# came with same size as yours in lrc trailer kings, lrd is a plus. 4yo swappped out to lrd carlisle radial trail hd.
Found this on google.
http://forums.goodsamclub.com/index....d/28628472.cfm
Good luck
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Old 02-18-2020, 04:19 AM   #12
CWtheMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skids View Post
Also, I question if rated loading for single at 2040 lbs @ 65psi and dual 1820 @ 65psi makes sense? Dual is when two tires are mounted side by side much like on the rear of dually trucks.
As the standard is written, tires fitted to RV trailers MUST provide a load capacity equal to the maximum load of the vehicle certified axle (s). That's 1750# of load capacity for each end of a 3500# axle. In years past an owner could expect to see those 3500# axles fitted with tires providing 1760#.

Within the same standard the vehicle manufacturers are directed to use tires that are appropriate for that vehicle. For most TTs that means they can use ST, LT or P tires. Once their selection is made and displayed on the vehicle certification label, it becomes the minimum standard for that vehicle.

Trailer axles are hardly ever balance equally and one end can be carrying substantially more weight than the tire can support. The tire degrades rapidly and fails.

Because NHTSA failed (again) in 2010 to change the rules to something that would provide tire load capacity reserves for RV trailer tire fitments, RVIA stepped-in. RVIA's membership comprises about 98% of the manufacturers of RV trailers. Their recommendation to the membership was to insure original equipment tires provide a minimum of 10% in load capacity reserves above vehicle certified axle maximum loads.

For today's 3500# axles, the minimum load capacity is 1925#. That makes the tire providing 2040# of load capacity a good choice. The tire industry are quick learners and that's why the ST205/75R14 tires are now produced with a LRD load capacity.
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