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Old 07-29-2021, 08:07 AM   #21
rlh1957
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It may be rated to tow that weight and you might be able to match all the combined and total gross weights on paper… question is still, should you?

On flat land all the numbers may work, go to the Smokies, Appalachian or try Rockies or Sierra and you’ll get a shock!
Engine lugs, transmission heats up, gears shift down and gassers running high rpm’s.
That said some people report success and their rig can tow a tank successfully.
Safety and satisfaction is your goal.
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Old 07-29-2021, 08:07 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KimNTerry View Post
I reduced the speed and downshifted to keep the truck in the power band and keep moving air over the engine. Knowing where the power band is and driving the truck to keep it in the power band makes all the difference on the eco boost.
This is the key! I rarely see people talk about this. This one of those "Operating the vehicle rather than Driving it" scenarios mentioned by another poster above.

You have to find the RPM range for each gear and stay within that range, even if it means slowly dropping down to 1st gear going 10mph. Even if you're revving the engine more than you like, it is less detrimental than the lugging and knocking.

Years ago, our 5.4 Expedition dragged the toy hauler over Monitor Pass after my bonehead reroute. She was thirsty, slow, singing, and warm but made it over fine because I tried to keep the engine in the power.

I like that TFH channel. Realistic testing of the trucks and honest comparisons/opinions it seems.
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Old 07-29-2021, 12:42 PM   #23
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The last post is SO true. When your working that (any) engine hard keep the RPMs in the power zone. Shift the auto transmission into the right gear.
From what I see during my travels and past job. Most think the vehicle has 1 gear. They drive up and lug the engine, going down they keep a foot on the brakes.
Even explaining that to my wife, she won't shift gears because she only drives her car. I down shifted her car on a steep down grade. She asked why I did that. She says that's what brakes are for. I cannot win.
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Old 07-29-2021, 01:28 PM   #24
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Here I was, thinking I was OK b/c I own a 2019 F250 with the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel--my first diesel, towing our first RV--and then you folks start talking about the power zone. I admit ignorance on this one. I did a little quick research and see that rated peak torque is 935 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM. So is that the center of the power zone? BTW when we went to Asheville NC this winter (the only mts we've driven thus far), we encountered some significant grades (=/> 8%) and the truck didn't seem to break into much of a sweat @ 60-65 mph max. Out 36-ft TT probably weighed around 9500 lb fully loaded.
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Old 07-29-2021, 01:51 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by brodavefla View Post
Here I was, thinking I was OK b/c I own a 2019 F250 with the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel--my first diesel, towing our first RV--and then you folks start talking about the power zone. I admit ignorance on this one. I did a little quick research and see that rated peak torque is 935 lb-ft @ 1800 RPM. So is that the center of the power zone? BTW when we went to Asheville NC this winter (the only mts we've driven thus far), we encountered some significant grades (=/> 8%) and the truck didn't seem to break into much of a sweat @ 60-65 mph max. Out 36-ft TT probably weighed around 9500 lb fully loaded.
The diesels have much more torque and can maintain the rpms on a grade most of the time…if your rpms start falling and the engine is struggling that’s when you would downshift if it didn’t kick into a lower gear itself

Most of this discussion was about gas engines
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Old 08-02-2021, 02:32 PM   #26
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Quote from #4

("In a normally aspirated engine (Not turbocharged or supercharged) the reduced air volume will cause the engine controls to deliver less fuel to maintain the air/fuel ratio. This lean fuel mix creats more heat. The anti knock sensors will reduce ipower even further to prevent detonation (us old folks remember engine "ping" under heavy load) from hlowing pistons apart.")

I don't know where you studied Automotive technology, but this is factually untrue.
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Old 05-04-2024, 05:51 AM   #27
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Not lean

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Originally Posted by flybouy View Post
In a normally aspirated engine (Not turbocharged or supercharged) the reduced air volume will cause the engine controls to deliver less fuel to maintain the air/fuel ratio. This lean fuel mix creats more heat.
I know this is an old thread but I came across it and read your comment and felt it necessary to correct this misinformation. Your comment is contradictory to itself. Yes the ECU will be delivering less fuel because of the lack of density of air but just the fact that you said that was to "maintain the air/fuel ratio," should have tipped you off to the fact that this is not creating a 'lean" mixture. The actual problem with cooling at altitude in any engine is two-fold, one the less dense air is less effective for cooling as it cannot pull as much heat from the heat exchangers, i.e. radiator. Two, the engine must run at a higher RPM (pumping more air which is what makes power) to maintain a certain speed which will create more heat no matter what the altitude is. This is why slowing down to allow the engine to do it's work at lower RPM is necessary to keep temps down, it's also much better for the transmission at the same time.
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Old 05-04-2024, 06:29 AM   #28
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I think anyone thinking a 1500 1/2 ton truck is enough to tow anything over about 5000lbs should be lead to this post!!!
GOOD READING!!!!

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Old 05-04-2024, 07:10 AM   #29
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Unless the vehicle is Airborne, the reference is elevation, not altitude.

Altitude is a measurement above the ground.
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Old 05-04-2024, 12:03 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by GlasNav View Post
Unless the vehicle is Airborne, the reference is elevation, not altitude.

Altitude is a measurement above the ground.
How do you measure elevation? Isn't a 4,000' mountains "elevation" not 4,000' above sea level? The 4k elevation will have the same air density as 4k above sea level. Curious, why did you pick this dormant thread to argue such a trivial point?

Altitude is not a measurement above ground, it is the measurement above sea level.
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Old 05-04-2024, 12:28 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flybouy View Post
How do you measure elevation? Isn't a 4,000' mountains "elevation" not 4,000' above sea level? The 4k elevation will have the same air density as 4k above sea level. Curious, why did you pick this dormant thread to argue such a trivial point?

Altitude is not a measurement above ground, it is the measurement above sea level.
I wouldn't have even seen this thread if it hadn't been readdressed earlier today. However, unless the F150 can fly, both you and I know it is the incorrect term. Something about constantly being around pilots has a tendency for some things to rub off!

And then there's the ground altimeter setting for aircraft at airports.....
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Old 05-04-2024, 02:27 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by GlasNav View Post
I wouldn't have even seen this thread if it hadn't been readdressed earlier today. However, unless the F150 can fly, both you and I know it is the incorrect term. Something about constantly being around pilots has a tendency for some things to rub off!

And then there's the ground altimeter setting for aircraft at airports.....
I am a private pilot .
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Old 05-04-2024, 03:32 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by flybouy View Post
I am a private pilot .
dang!!!
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Old 05-04-2024, 04:13 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flybouy View Post
I am a private pilot .
Marshall: That was a given considering your call sign / user name as well as it being in your profile!
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Old 05-05-2024, 07:38 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by GlasNav View Post
Unless the vehicle is Airborne, the reference is elevation, not altitude.

Altitude is a measurement above the ground.
While I appreciate your efforts, in this context we are talking air density which is atmospheric science which does, in fact, utilize altitude MSL. The engine doesn’t care if it’s in a vehicle on the ground or airborne.
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Old 05-05-2024, 07:53 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by TheWizardDJ View Post
While I appreciate your efforts, in this context we are talking air density which is atmospheric science which does, in fact, utilize altitude MSL. The engine doesn’t care if it’s in a vehicle on the ground or airborne.
I do understand, my son's Moony has adjustable turbo boost and fuel controls that are ALTITUDE interactive!

MSL, barometric pressure, I fully understand the terms, what they mean how they all interact.

BTW: If I recall, Volvo back in the early 1970 was the first to have barometric pressure automatic adjustable carburetors in their vehicles so they would automatically change the fuel air ratio while the car transited mountains and changes in elevation.
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Old 05-05-2024, 08:51 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by GlasNav View Post
I do understand, my son's Moony has adjustable turbo boost and fuel controls that are ALTITUDE interactive!

MSL, barometric pressure, I fully understand the terms, what they mean how they all interact.

BTW: If I recall, Volvo back in the early 1970 was the first to have barometric pressure automatic adjustable carburetors in their vehicles so they would automatically change the fuel air ratio while the car transited mountains and changes in elevation.
Just so we are clear, you are stating that because your son’s plane uses altitude nothing on the ground can and instead must use elevation?

Out of curiosity, can a mountain climber only have altitude sickness after they jump off a cliff?
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Old 05-05-2024, 08:53 AM   #38
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We are veering off the course of the thread. Lets keep the responses applicable to the original question.
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Old 05-05-2024, 10:11 AM   #39
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When Gulliver entered the land of Lilliput, he was astounded when there were two violently opposed sides. The argument? Which end of an egg to crack open. Thought that might be appropriate for this thread.
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Old 05-15-2024, 06:30 AM   #40
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We pulled Wolf Creek pass with an F150 and 3.5 EcoBoost. I didn't have a 12k trailer behind me. Mine is rated at 6500lbs GVWR and we were loaded lighter than a lot of people out for 3 weeks. Anyway, the 3.5 did well from east of the Mississippi, over the mountains and back, keeping up with traffic all along the way. The only temperature item I noticed was the transmission temperature (I've got a cooler) hit about 220-225 by the time we hit the top from Pagosa Springs. That's less than critical on the 10-speed and it seemed to have leveled off.

On flat ground, loaded for bear, we had no issues all the way to South East Colorado where we stopped carrying provisions for more than a couple of days. My wife realized that there was in fact, a Walmart everywhere along the way.

We stayed at Gulf State Park on another trip and I saw a guy with Arizona plates pulling at least a 30' rig with a similarly optioned truck as mine. I was going to quiz him to see how it went, but didn't get a chance. I'm not as brave as he "appeared" to be.
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