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Old 06-28-2020, 11:06 AM   #21
sonofcy
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That is NOT a deep cycle battery. Look at the MCA on the side of the battery, it's a Hybrid start/deep cycle. A true deep cycle has no spec for Cranking. Get a pair of GC's by Trojan (T105) or others, 6V 225AH. If you have a residential fridge do NOT boondock with 2, get at least 4 plus 400 to 600 watts of solar.
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Old 06-28-2020, 01:40 PM   #22
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No interest in boon docking. My only interest is making it through up to 13 hours in a parking lot while I am at work until I start the truck and head off into the sunset. I just got a amp clamp meter that reads DC current. I was surprised to see that when the fridge runs it shows I have 8 amp draw on the battery by the investor shows only 0.5 amps. 8 amps on a 202 amp system for 13 hours is just over 50% discharge. Unless I am not understanding something. Luckily I can check on the voltage throughout the night and will flip the switch at 40% if I get there. I will trying this tomorrow when I leave for work.
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Old 06-28-2020, 02:07 PM   #23
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No interest in boon docking. My only interest is making it through up to 13 hours in a parking lot while I am at work until I start the truck and head off into the sunset. I just got a amp clamp meter that reads DC current. I was surprised to see that when the fridge runs it shows I have 8 amp draw on the battery by the investor shows only 0.5 amps. 8 amps on a 202 amp system for 13 hours is just over 50% discharge. Unless I am not understanding something. Luckily I can check on the voltage throughout the night and will flip the switch at 40% if I get there. I will trying this tomorrow when I leave for work.
A residential fridge will draw 3 to 4 amps max. That will be roughly 30 to 40 coming out of the batteries. I did a multi day killawatt test and my Samsug uses 1.5kWh per day. Working backwards from there, a standard Trojan T105 pair has 1.5kWh usable (50%discharge). That means the fridge alone will drain the battery in 24 hrs. If that's all you are running then you are good to go for 13 hours.
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Old 06-28-2020, 03:14 PM   #24
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Convertor question

I rewired my disconnect to be a true master. I think I am going to add the investor to the battery side and run that from just its switch. That way I know that is all that is getting power. No detector or antenna booster draw
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:13 PM   #25
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Okay, to report back the batteries made it through the night with no issues. I rearranged the wiring so that the inverter is the only thing on the battery side of the kill switch. Everything else is on the load side. After 12.5 hours, I was at 12.2 volts. Only thing I don't under stand is the amp readings I had. My inverter takes 2.5 amps to sit idle. It also has a display that tells the amperage it is putting out. It would show about 0.5amps. When I used the DC current clamp I would show that the batteries had about a 7-8 amp draw. I feel like I am missing something but I know that the battery positive and the positive to the circuit breaker to the inverter are the only things on that side of the switch. Anyways just wanted to report back how it went for future readers to base decisions from.
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Old 07-01-2020, 04:35 AM   #26
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Assuming your 2019 Ram is the same as my 2018, the 12volt hot pin in the truck bed is hot all the time. Be careful about letting the trailer pulling the truck batteries down. I would unplug it from the truck if left any amount of time.
I just got back from a 2,000 mile round trip. The first day at a refueling stop I heard a beeping from the front of the 5th. It was the residential fridge inverter beeping that my battery was low. It was 11.6 volts. I discovered I had somewhat loose cables on the battery posts. I run stainless steel nylock nuts on my boat batteries and will replace the 5th battery nuts soon.
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Old 07-01-2020, 06:36 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by sonofcy View Post
That is NOT a deep cycle battery. Look at the MCA on the side of the battery, it's a Hybrid start/deep cycle. A true deep cycle has no spec for Cranking. Get a pair of GC's by Trojan (T105) or others, 6V 225AH. If you have a residential fridge do NOT boondock with 2, get at least 4 plus 400 to 600 watts of solar.
Sonofcy is correct, the batteries you bought are not true deep cycle batteries. Wal-Mart does sell deep cycle batteries. You might want to look at getting them to swap them out.
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Old 07-02-2020, 12:30 AM   #28
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Convertor question

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Assuming your 2019 Ram is the same as my 2018, the 12volt hot pin in the truck bed is hot all the time. Be careful about letting the trailer pulling the truck batteries down. I would unplug it from the truck if left any amount of time.
I just got back from a 2,000 mile round trip. The first day at a refueling stop I heard a beeping from the front of the 5th. It was the residential fridge inverter beeping that my battery was low. It was 11.6 volts. I discovered I had somewhat loose cables on the battery posts. I run stainless steel nylock nuts on my boat batteries and will replace the 5th battery nuts soon.

It is the same. I unplug it and turn off the battery disconnect. Then leave a sticky note in my steering wheel to plug it back in and turn the disconnect back on.
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Old 07-02-2020, 05:39 AM   #29
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It is the same. I unplug it and turn off the battery disconnect. Then leave a sticky note in my steering wheel to plug it back in and turn the disconnect back on.
I think most modern trucks cut the power to the 7 pin when the truck is turned off. I know for sure my 2018 Ford does. IIRC it will not turn on again until you turn truck on AND either put in gear or apply brakes, I don't remember which. Once it comes on it will stay however until turned off again.
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Old 07-02-2020, 10:50 AM   #30
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Good to know about Ford. I tested my Ram after about an hour of sitting and it was still live. There is a post above that says a new Chevy is the same way.
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Old 07-02-2020, 04:50 PM   #31
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Okay, to report back the batteries made it through the night with no issues. I rearranged the wiring so that the inverter is the only thing on the battery side of the kill switch. Everything else is on the load side. After 12.5 hours, I was at 12.2 volts. Only thing I don't under stand is the amp readings I had. My inverter takes 2.5 amps to sit idle. It also has a display that tells the amperage it is putting out. It would show about 0.5amps. When I used the DC current clamp I would show that the batteries had about a 7-8 amp draw. I feel like I am missing something but I know that the battery positive and the positive to the circuit breaker to the inverter are the only things on that side of the switch. Anyways just wanted to report back how it went for future readers to base decisions from.
Unless I'm interpreting this all wrong ... your current numbers almost balance, and maybe even do counting for efficiency issues. Remember current time voltage is (essentially) a constant, and the "essentially" is in there to accommodate efficiency issues. So:

8A X 12V = 96W
96W / 120V = 0.8A

Of that 0.8A, roughly 0.25A is inverter use/loss (as you stated 2.5A @ 12V) which leaves you about 0.55A which is close to your stated 0.5A value.
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Old 07-02-2020, 06:22 PM   #32
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Unless I'm interpreting this all wrong ... your current numbers almost balance, and maybe even do counting for efficiency issues. Remember current time voltage is (essentially) a constant, and the "essentially" is in there to accommodate efficiency issues. So:

8A X 12V = 96W
96W / 120V = 0.8A

Of that 0.8A, roughly 0.25A is inverter use/loss (as you stated 2.5A @ 12V) which leaves you about 0.55A which is close to your stated 0.5A value.

That makes sense. I was forgetting that 12v amps isnít the same as 110 amps. Thanks
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Old 07-02-2020, 06:39 PM   #33
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That makes sense. I was forgetting that 12v amps isnít the same as 110 amps. Thanks

Amps are amps as far as I've ever studied:

"DC Amps and AC amps are the exact same thing, they are the measurement of electrons past a given point, the difference is that the electrons of AC go back and forth (alternating) and DC go only in one direction".

I will tell you when you want to get "astraddle of them" DC is almost like a hot burn, AC feels like it will blow your heart up (when "astraddle" of it; btdt) and pulse every fiber of your being.
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Old 07-03-2020, 04:26 PM   #34
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That makes sense. I was forgetting that 12v amps isn’t the same as 110 amps. Thanks
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Amps are amps as far as I've ever studied:

"DC Amps and AC amps are the exact same thing, they are the measurement of electrons past a given point, the difference is that the electrons of AC go back and forth (alternating) and DC go only in one direction".

I will tell you when you want to get "astraddle of them" DC is almost like a hot burn, AC feels like it will blow your heart up (when "astraddle" of it; btdt) and pulse every fiber of your being.
Danny is right - an ampere (or shortened, amp) is literally a measure of the number of electrons that pass a given point in one second; it is independent of the type of electromotive driving force, voltage.

My comment came from the principle of conservation of energy, in this instance a watt (which is energy per second). The energy output has to equal the energy input. As no device is 100% efficient, some of the energy that passes through it will be "lost" to heat, thus the input side has a greater power consumption than the output side can deliver. The difference between the input energy and output energy is heat energy, so:

input energy = output energy + heat energy
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Old 07-07-2020, 03:52 AM   #35
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FYI check all the fuses for the converter internal and external, the converter can show you a voltage charge but put out no actual amperage and that is almost always a blown fuse in the converter... just in case... Sometimes when you use high amperage systems and a completely dead battery it can overload the converter, some have regular bus fuses some have slow blow fuses.
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Old 07-07-2020, 07:16 AM   #36
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Also remember that most inverters use a step up transformer to increase the voltage from 12 VDC to 120 VAC, then the "inverter" puts the "cycles" in the solid voltage waveform....

Any time the inverter is plugged in, the 10:1 step up transformer primary winding is energized and is "flowing DC power through the winding". That causes a "heat loss" and is the "parasitic loss" or the 1/4 amp load shown on a DC ammeter connected to the power input on the inverter. Then, to add "wasted energy" if the CONverter is still powered on by the INverter, the CONverter will try to charge the batteries, which creates an "energy consuming circuit that goes nowhere fast"... In other words, you use battery power to make AC and use that AC to make DC to charge the battery that's providing DC to the AC producer....

There is an enormous amount of "wasted energy if that is happening.

THEN, to "add insult to injury" remember the posts about "120 volts at .8 amps is the same as 12 volts at 8 amps. The "DC side of the equation "loses power" much faster than the AC side uses it... So, depending on the battery system, the inverter can "suck down a battery charge" at phenomenal speed, even when everything is turned off on the 120 VAC side (through that primary winding) especially if the CONverter is left on.

This link may explain it a bit better than I can: https://www.guaranty.com/blog/whats-...and-converter/
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