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Eggs Benedict
11-02-2021, 04:53 AM
Hello all, I have had my 2007 Passport for about a month. It's on my job site, and in another month, I'll need to move it to a storage facility, or (my latest crazy scheme) get a hold of a trailer dolly and jackknife it in behind my garage. As it turns out, the seller I bought it from was blatantly untruthful about almost everything he said, and my trailer has two soft spots on the roof, at least one on the floor, and lots of minor damage and wear. However, it's not leaking inside right now, and the appliances pretty much work, and it's comfortable and I've become attached to it. I am capable of doing the repairs, which would go much faster if I can store the trailer at home, where I have a garage workshop. I don't mind TOO much that I'll have to replace some roof and subfloor, since I was already planning to replace the weathered roof membrane, as I'm going to add solar and change the roof penetrations, and am going to change the flooring anyway, getting rid of the carpet.

My question is has anyone put down a gravel pad for your trailer, and does anyone have any tips on renting and using a trailer dolly a couple of times a year to get a trailer stored in an otherwise inaccessible spot? It will have to roll across a few feet of lawn and then pivot. I can't get back there with a tow vehicle, but I think an electric dolly could make it happen. Will try to rent one from an RV repair place for a few hours. Failing that, I guess I'll either buy a dolly or find a service that will bring a dolly and park my trailer.

Canonman
11-02-2021, 05:45 AM
I have not tried using a trailer dolly but did seriously consider it before removing a couple of trees and grass to create an access to my RV parking. The big concern is rolling over any soft (think grass) or rough (think gravel) surfaces. There will be significant weight on those somewhat small dolly wheels. The actual contact patch is just inches.
You might want to consider creating a plywood pathway for everything to roll on. You could leapfrog the plywood to keep from having to buy enough for the whole distance.
I agree that having the trailer close by for repairs and maintenance is the way to go.

JRTJH
11-02-2021, 06:47 AM
Most trailer dollies, in fact all that I've seen, have extremely small, high pressure or solid wheels. They are intended to be used on concrete surfaces and do not have the traction or wheel contact surface area to be used in gravel or sandy soil. I'd suspect that you're going to find that you just get the power dolly off the concrete and with the weight of the trailer tongue pushing down on the dolly, as soon as you try to move the trailer, the wheels will dig in and you'll be "hopelessly stuck".

I use my tractor (I take the front loader off if I need clearance) and hitch my trailers to the 3 point hitch. With a 10' tractor length and the ability to make sharp turns, I can use the tractor in 4 wheel drive to put trailers in fairly tight places.

You might know someone with a small compact tractor that could help you move it ???

I don't think you'll have any success with a power dolly on gravel.....

skids
11-02-2021, 07:29 AM
If it is compact gravel, I suggest using sections of 2x10 or 2x8 to park on. They can bow upwards a little on the ends. I understand that parking directly on earth can be detrimental to tires. It might be a myth, but this is something that I do as well as cover the tires to protect from U.V.

jasin1
11-02-2021, 08:37 AM
Do you have enough room to pull the truck first into the yard instead of backing in? Pull farther into the yard and then back it up tight to the garage (carefully)

jasin1
11-02-2021, 09:07 AM
I’ve also used floor jacks and a come-a-long to maneuver vehicles around that didn’t have a operable motor…need to be careful with trailer suspension though

linux3
11-02-2021, 10:29 AM
I had a pad put in next to my garage.
Stone, gravel and topped with crush and run. The installer power compacted it but it was still too soft.

I wet it down and ran my truck over the pad a bunch of times to get a semi firm surface.
I really doubt you can run a dolly on my pad.

schwengel11161
11-02-2021, 03:37 PM
I have always had a front 2" recvr hitch mounted on my tow trucks, mostly F250's........I back boats and trailers in storage units and it makes it much easier, tight turns included.

gearhead
11-03-2021, 04:33 AM
I've got an area of crushed limestone I park on. The 5th wheel, a john boat, the Bigfoot, and a utility trailer.
Maybe look for one of the forklifts you see hooked on to the back of a sod delivery truck. Try calling United rental. You will need some kind of attachment for the fork to tongue connection.
A small rental tractor with a front bucket could work.
A front receiver, if it works, would be the simplest.
Welcome to the forum, from Liberty.

That Guy Lindsey
11-03-2021, 10:42 AM
The powered dolly will be tough on the gravel unless its packed well. We added a large gravel area next to our house last year so we could park my Son's RamCharger and also the boat and just more room for us to manuever. fortunately it is straight off the driveway run (garage is 90° to the drive). Boat is sold and the TT now sits where it was. the gravel has now compacted enough where the wheels have traveled but there was some sinking. If you can rent a dolly get one with large wheels and tires.

77cruiser
11-03-2021, 05:34 PM
If you could rent a ASV with a ball on the front it would be ideal.

gearhead
11-04-2021, 05:56 AM
If you could rent a ASV with a ball on the front it would be ideal.
What's a ASV??

77cruiser
11-04-2021, 06:05 AM
What's a ASV??


Skidsteer:facepalm:

firestation12
11-05-2021, 07:26 AM
If you could rent a ASV with a ball on the front it would be ideal.


Maneuvering the 2 axle trailer behind the garage will require the tires to skid sideways. I question whether the electric dolly the OP has in mind, will have enough traction or will be powerful enough to slide the tires. My vote also is to have a skid steer (aka ASV, Bobcat) do the moving. This is a project the owner needs to make sure finances, time, and resources are adequate, other wise this trailer will be a permanent roadblock to his garage. Just thinking about the work this project is going to require, I feel a snooze:dizzy: coming on.

gearhead
11-05-2021, 07:27 AM
I had another thought. Maybe a mini excavator.
But a Bobcat type skid steer on rubber threads would be best.

wiredgeorge
11-05-2021, 09:22 AM
Skidsteer:facepalm:

I would ask what a Skidsteer is but don't want to sound ignorant. :popcorn:

gearhead
11-05-2021, 10:54 AM
Miniature CAT D9.
They have all kinds of attachments. Post hole digger, bucket with grappler, bush hog....
https://bobcatofhouston.com/rentals/?utm_medium=ppc&utm_campaign=bobcat&scid=3760415&kw=18403638&pub_cr_id=82532393213646&network=o&device=c&targetid=kwd-82532266293633:loc-115171&loc_interest_ms=&loc_physical_ms=73737&tc=fbb011622b8c126977b970e7563ff0b4&rl_key=cb73a871254379a17f2fd100c5bb0d6e

travelin texans
11-05-2021, 12:03 PM
I would ask what a Skidsteer is but don't want to sound ignorant. :popcorn:

You probably know it as a bobcat same as I did/do. Although bobcat is a brand of skid steer.

bigdave_185
11-05-2021, 08:16 PM
You probably know it as a bobcat same as I did/do. Although bobcat is a brand of skid steer.


Like a brand name like Kleenex, all major companies in excavation equipment produce various sizes and weights and styles. Tracks, rubber tires, narrow width, single arm lift, extra heigh lifting.
I moved a few today, one with our gps grading unit. Makes sidewalk prep stupid easy!
36922

She weighs about 12k with out the attachment, we added a large bit of weight to help with bounce snd use with the gps system

jasin1
11-06-2021, 06:00 AM
If you go the skid steer route then I would find a local small contractor that does work in the area and is traveling the roads around you on a daily basis…maybe a driveway guy or plumber…have the swing by in the afternoon a couple times a year to maneuver the trailer.
Ask him what’s his favorite beer and have a case of it for him and a crisp $100 bill.
If you rent one then your gonna pay at least for a half day each time you rent it

Stop by the closest local bar around you and I’m sure there will be a contractor that stops off almost daily..
Just ask the bartender

Most important have EVERYTHING ready for him…no messing around and making him wait for you to get cars moved and things in place

SummitPond
11-06-2021, 07:25 AM
I have always had a front 2" recvr hitch mounted on my tow trucks, mostly F250's........I back boats and trailers in storage units and it makes it much easier, tight turns included.

Ditto for me, too. It works especially well if you have a long wheelbase. For a really tight turn you may need a short extender to prevent a jackknife, but ensure the hitch you put on the front can handle the tongue weight either with or without the extender. Also recognize you may need a different hitch for the front as it will be at a different distance compared to the rear hitch receiver from the ground.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/6uEk8GqLb5sGYfXs6

jasin1
11-06-2021, 07:56 AM
The Marina down the street from me uses an old Chevy pickup with a front hitch to move smaller boats around. He has the bed filled up with wooden blocks and cinder blocks so he doesn’t lose traction …if your yard has any soft spots you can easily get stuck if there isn’t any weight in the back unless you have four wheel drive.

JRTJH
11-06-2021, 03:31 PM
Being in 4 wheel drive with an overloaded front axle is an excellent recipe for buying new hubs... If you do install a front hitch, put a 1000 pound extra weight (trailer tongue) on that receiver, don't put it in 4x4 and "goose the accelerator" to keep from getting stuck in those soft spots.....

And, when in 4x4 and you feel the steering wheel "start to wobble" don't continue pushing beyond that wobble. The front u-joints and hubs are telling you to "back off"....

While 4 wheel drive is durable, it's not indestructible.....

gearhead
11-07-2021, 05:34 AM
If you go the skid steer route then I would find a local small contractor that does work in the area and is traveling the roads around you on a daily basis…maybe a driveway guy or plumber…have the swing by in the afternoon a couple times a year to maneuver the trailer.
Ask him what’s his favorite beer and have a case of it for him and a crisp $100 bill.
If you rent one then your gonna pay at least for a half day each time you rent it

Stop by the closest local bar around you and I’m sure there will be a contractor that stops off almost daily..
Just ask the bartender

Most important have EVERYTHING ready for him…no messing around and making him wait for you to get cars moved and things in place

Excellent idea.

larryflew
11-07-2021, 08:21 AM
Years ago we bought a front hitch for our Pathfinder to push our 25 foot trailer around the close garage space and put in the gravel pad you speak of. 2 years later traded up to 37 foot 5th wheel that won't fit in the space since you can't do sharp enough turns. We where pretty close to the max the front end of the Pathfinder could handle but it was awesome for storage.

Previous to that (back in tent camper days) we had a Subaru wagon with front hitch to push that little guy in and out of the woods we camped in.

Miloski
11-07-2021, 09:11 AM
Civil construction 25 years.
Send a picture to me and I’ll help you out.

David

friz
11-07-2021, 09:43 AM
I’ve also used floor jacks and a come-a-long to maneuver vehicles around that didn’t have a operable motor…need to be careful with trailer suspension though

That method works well on concrete pulling forward. Not so well, if at all on grass backing up.

fitz16316
11-07-2021, 10:42 AM
You might try contacting a shed mover in your area their machine can maneuver very large sheds into and out of very tight places and on soft ground

PRF
11-07-2021, 11:31 AM
Perhaps someone you know has an ATV that you can hook up to to move the trailer. Also I've seen collector cars that are placed on dollies (one under each wheel) that would allow you to help make that jackknife turn. On a hard surface you and a friend could push that trailer where you want it.

Joelwhammett
11-07-2021, 03:42 PM
You might check into the cost of renting a bobcat with a hitch ball attachment on it.

bigdave_185
11-07-2021, 03:50 PM
Considering the opp hasn’t been back in a week lol lots of options and no further feedback

merchjo
11-15-2021, 11:47 AM
Get one of these



https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Dolly/Trailer-Valet/TVRVR5.html

jawsmon
11-16-2021, 12:51 PM
Have you considered some car dollies? There are a variety of them available. You would need to lay down some plywood otherwise is would be fruitless. They would definitely sink into the ground unless it was concrete or asphalt. I use them to move vehicles around with hardly any effort......just a thought......

kguess
12-02-2021, 05:53 AM
I agree 100% about the front hitch! I had one on my 2014 f150 2 wheel drive but traded it for a 2020 f150 4 wheel drive and not sure how to mount a front receiver hitch to it. Any idea? Thanks

JRTJH
12-02-2021, 08:19 AM
I agree 100% about the front hitch! I had one on my 2014 f150 2 wheel drive but traded it for a 2020 f150 4 wheel drive and not sure how to mount a front receiver hitch to it. Any idea? Thanks

Try this for starters: https://www.americantrucks.com/curt-f150-front-mount-hitch-31083.html?utm_content=AT%20Towing%20-%20Hitches%7CStore%20Brand&T5_Var4=T543285&utm_campaign=ATF+F150+Vehicle+Medium&dialogtech=ppc&utm_source=google-pla&utm_medium=shopping&T5_Var2=shopping&T5_Var3=red&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI8_y4psLF9AIV1MmUCR35oAjREAQYBCAB EgLtrvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds