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Buffblazer
09-07-2021, 11:40 AM
Hello all, Picked up my Outback a couple weeks ago and I cruised the site reading threads with the search bar aimed specifically at the Outback's but was hoping to get some help with a few questions. Would love to find a factory build sheet to see what all options these campers come with but I cant seem to locate one.

1. Solar prep, I have the port down on the frame but was wondering if also there is one on the roof that I have heard other models having? I looked but wasn't sure where to find it.

2. Rear slide I know that the bed is rated to hold 1,000 pounds, and I know on the older models that it was recommended to support the bed when traveling from the inside with a T brace. On the 2018, do you still need the brace and is the bed capable of handling being slept on in the closed postion?

3. Puck lights Mine has the interior puck lights that can individually be shut off, any problem with installing a dimmer switch at the main switch?

4. fishing pole holder anyone have any nifty ideas of a spot to mount them on this model? was thinking to the bottom of the flip up bunk so that they are up high when its folded, or underneath when laying flat. Or I was going to mount hang them from the top of the rear storage compartment. other ideas welcomed.

5.Batteries I hunt cold winters here in Colorado so dual batteries with a generator backup is what I have ran in the past. Was looking to build a custom box with 3 batteries. I have researched the different styles of batteries and what not, but was thinking of just sticking with 27 series. Brand suggestions? Or is there a better 2 battery setup than the 3 for the same price point? (not looking to spend a massive amount on batteries.

6. experience Curious as to anyone with this model, across the years, if yall have some suggestions on what to keep an eye out for or any other specific mods that you have found that has enhanced your camping experience.


Thank you.

wiredgeorge
09-07-2021, 12:16 PM
Quote, "2. Rear slide I know that the bed is rated to hold 1,000 pounds, and I know on the older models that it was recommended to support the bed when traveling from the inside with a T brace. On the 2018, do you still need the brace and is the bed capable of handling being slept on in the closed postion?" Unquote

This part of your question confuses me. I have never heard anyone recommend a T brace for a slide of any sort. I see that the bed slides out the back. I can see why they would limit the bed when in use to 1000 lbs. Why would sleeping on the bed while it is not out make any difference. I am sure some owner of a similar bed in the rear slide out will be able to jump in and answer. Good luck.

Buffblazer
09-07-2021, 12:36 PM
Quote, "2. Rear slide I know that the bed is rated to hold 1,000 pounds, and I know on the older models that it was recommended to support the bed when traveling from the inside with a T brace. On the 2018, do you still need the brace and is the bed capable of handling being slept on in the closed postion?" Unquote

This part of your question confuses me. I have never heard anyone recommend a T brace for a slide of any sort. I see that the bed slides out the back. I can see why they would limit the bed when in use to 1000 lbs. Why would sleeping on the bed while it is not out make any difference. I am sure some owner of a similar bed in the rear slide out will be able to jump in and answer. Good luck.

During my research into the models with the rear slide, I had read that the early models would pull the slide rails out of the ceiling when traveling. People would put a brace from the floor to the bed to help support it. Same research showed that the bed was only rated for 50 pounds when slid in. I think this was the styles that were queen beds with outside support braces for when in use.

I believe that style ran from 2003 to somewhere around 2009-2010 and when they went to the king size slide they redesigned them, they changed the slide mechanics too. That's where it gets fuzzy, I cant find really much info on if needing to support the slide is something I should have concern about, or how much weight it can support when in the traveling position.

wiredgeorge
09-07-2021, 02:29 PM
This issue is arcane and it may be no one has an idea; could be wrong. Suggest a call to Keystone Customer Service and see if they will pass your question to a technical type or engineer but I suspect they will have no idea. A dealer will be even less likely to have a clue.

2425 Davis Drive
PO Box 2000
Goshen, IN 46527-2000
Phone (toll free): (866) 425-4369
Monday through Thursday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM (ET)
Friday 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM (ET)

Stumpy75
09-08-2021, 04:46 PM
I have a bed support on mine. It's a king bed.

Many posts when I bought it about the "new" king bed and the fact that it will hold 1000lb. And then some reports of the ceiling brace pulling down on this new king bed. So I fabbed a brace.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0026T0R0G/ref=dp_iou_view_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Here's what I bought. I had to trim it some to get it to fit. I see on Amazon that there might be others that would fit without having to modify it.

I also added the pad below to spread out the load on the floor.

https://www.task-tools.com/index.php/quick-support-rods/2-3-8-x-13-5-8-qsr-soft-pad-1-pack.html

MarkEHansen
09-10-2021, 05:10 AM
As for the batteries, one thing to keep in mind is that different types of batteries react differently to discharging. For example, a standard car battery is not intended to be discharged very much at all. It is expected to start the engine and then get charged right back up from the car's charging system.

Most trailers are sold with marine/combo batteries. These are labeled as Deep Cycle, but they aren't true deep cycle batteries and as a result, they don't take discharges well either.

If you're operating without the benefit of shore power, you really need batteries that are made to be discharged. This is where true deep cycle batteries come in. True deep cycle batteries won't include, for example, a cold cranking Amp (CCA) rating.

One example of a deep cycle battery is a GC2 (or Golf Cart) battery. These are 6V batteries and are very heavy duty. You can safely discharge them to 50% without risking damage.

You can get these type of batteries from stores like Sams Club or Costco for under $100 each. In general, you can get more capacity from 2 of these 6V batteries than 2 12V batteries and they will cost less.

The next thing I would recommend is a good shunt-based battery monitor. Using this, you can make sure you know where the state of charge (SOC) is for your battery and make sure you recharge it before it gets too low. One example of such a monitor is the Victron BMV-712. There are less expensive ones, but this is the one I'm using. You can configure the monitor to treat 50% SOC as "empty" so you can watch the battery level on the monitor and know that when it reads empty (0), it means you're at 50% and need to recharge.

notanlines
09-10-2021, 05:30 AM
"3. Puck lights Mine has the interior puck lights that can individually be shut off, any problem with installing a dimmer switch at the main switch?"
Bear in mind that should these be LED lights not all are designed to be used with dimmer switches.

MarkEHansen
09-10-2021, 05:42 AM
In case it wasn't obvious, if you choose to go with 6V batteries, they need to go in pairs. They get wired in series to get 12V, as your camper requires a 12V storage system.

If you find that you need more capacity than that provided by 2 6V GC2s, you can go 4 GC2 (wired correctly), but this gets heavy. There are other ways to get more capacity with less weight, but it gets really expensive (like lithium batteries, for example).

I'm using 2 GC2 batteries, wired in series to provide 12V and easily go a couple days before I need to recharge. Actual duration will depend on the power load you place on the batteries, of course.