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NewKey
03-12-2021, 04:28 PM
Hello, just bought a new premier 24rkpr with two slides. Never had a 30 foot trailer with slides and I am unsure of how to level it properly.

I would level by the kitchen counters, fridge, floor in my old tiny trailer, but now with the slides, the kitchen is in the back and closed off.

What is the best way to level the trailer? Any other tips would be welcomed.

Thank you.

chuckster57
03-12-2021, 05:24 PM
I usually use the floor, in the middle if possible at the entry door

JRTJH
03-12-2021, 05:43 PM
^^^ What Chuck said....

First, open the main trailer door, lay a 18" or 24" level on a part of the vinyl floor, not on the carpet. Then level the trailer side to side. by pulling forward/back while placing blocks under the trailer tires. Once that is done, place chocks at the wheels, unhitch and change the position of the level. Then level the trailer front to back using the trailer tongue jack.

Once that is done, extend the trailer stabilizers. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO LEVEL THE TRAILER WITH STABILIZER JACKS. You'll damage/bend them. They are not designed to lift the trailer, only to stabilize it.

Once the trailer is level and stabilized, extend the slides and finish setting up the trailer.

notanlines
03-13-2021, 02:47 AM
Exactly as was explained above. ^^^^ Always level from the same floor position. The first time, once you're sure it is level, move your level to the stove top and make minor adjustments to the stove to make sure it is level if necessary. Everything else in the RV will do fine if they are off a degree or two, but when trying to cook on the stove if it is not level is a bear.
JMHO YMMV

NewKey
03-13-2021, 08:25 AM
Thank you all for your replies.

With my previous small trailer, I did level from the counter top/stove but with the 24rkpr, the slides close off the back kitchen, so do I open the slides first before levelling, while stilled attached the my truck?

slides last (like the post above) is what keystone says.

chuckster57
03-13-2021, 08:27 AM
I dont extend slides until I am level and stab jacks are on the ground solid.

flybouy
03-13-2021, 08:59 AM
I'd suggest you buy some bubble levels to attach to the trailer. Two of them are very inexpensive if that's an issue. Better yet is the Level Mate Pro blue tooth level but it's a bit pricey.

Go to a large level parking lot and spend some time getting the trail nice and level. Then attach the bubble levels with screws, the tape will not hold them in position. Then when setting up the bubble levels should get you close enough. I like the Level Mate Pro because I an back into (or pull into ) a site, look at my phone and know which side is low. Then I place my Anderson levelers under the tires on that side and move the trailer until level. Unhitch and finish with the tongue jack leveling front to back.

As a footnote, our trailer has two large slide outs on the driver's side. To compensate for the force of the slides I will set it up with that side about 1" high. Then when the slides are extended it settles to level.

JRTJH
03-13-2021, 09:35 AM
I have one of these mounted to the pinbox of my fifth wheel. One mark on the level equals 1 plastic 1" pad under the tires on the low side. It's just a matter of coordinating the adjustment of the level and the stove. For us, the stove and the trailer floor are "on the same attitude (level) so when the floor is level, so is the stove. So I adjusted the pinbox level (photo) with a 36" level on the trailer floor and everything is "on the level" (so to speak).

If you have slides on only one side of your trailer, you may find that the weight of the extended slides will cause the trailer to "lean to the heavy side" and offset your level adjustments. If that's the situation, you can always "level with the slides in so that the trailer is 1" high on the slide side"... That way, when you extend the slides, the trailer will "sag that 1" and you're level with the slides extended".... It's just a matter of planning what the end result will be and working "backwards" to get there.

This is what I have on the front of my trailer. There are adapter mounts available so you can mount this type level on the front wall of a travel trailer. If it's mounted "visible from the driver's seat" it's just a matter of watching the level to determine how many plastic pads to put under the tires on the low side.

chuckster57
03-13-2021, 09:56 AM
I have one of these mounted to the pinbox of my fifth wheel. One mark on the level equals 1 plastic 1" pad under the tires on the low side. It's just a matter of coordinating the adjustment of the level and the stove. For us, the stove and the trailer floor are "on the same attitude (level) so when the floor is level, so is the stove. So I adjusted the pinbox level (photo) with a 36" level on the trailer floor and everything is "on the level" (so to speak).

If you have slides on only one side of your trailer, you may find that the weight of the extended slides will cause the trailer to "lean to the heavy side" and offset your level adjustments. If that's the situation, you can always "level with the slides in so that the trailer is 1" high on the slide side"... That way, when you extend the slides, the trailer will "sag that 1" and you're level with the slides extended".... It's just a matter of planning what the end result will be and working "backwards" to get there.

This is what I have on the front of my trailer. There are adapter mounts available so you can mount this type level on the front wall of a travel trailer. If it's mounted "visible from the driver's seat" it's just a matter of watching the level to determine how many plastic pads to put under the tires on the low side.

Great minds think alike, But IIRC my brackets got a bit corroded so I powder coated them. :D