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aboyz
12-28-2020, 03:52 PM
Hi,

I have been going to local dealership and getting quote from local dealership. It seem like the local dealership is way more expensive then online website. like rvtrader or rvusa and some other dealership in UTAH and Arizona. It seem like CA have the highest price quote.

I have been reseraching that the MSRP they listed on the trailer at local dealership is fake or they can list whatever MSRP they want. Anyway example say a bullet 1700BH MSRP listed on the keystone website for: $21,398.

Dealership says the MSRP is $31,000. So I'm marking it down for you $26,950 + tax and doc fee of $350. So after tax and everything i'm looking around $28,500.

Now for the online price i saw on the same model listed for $22,500 in Utah and Arizona.

There is a huge gap here for purchasing it locally. Anyway my question is where can you get the best deal? where should you go looking? should I get a used trailer that is one year old? Or which website should I be looking? How do I bargain with them? Any insider hints or secret on this?

Please advise any good suggestions and advice for me to hunt down my dream trailer?

thank you

LewisB
12-28-2020, 04:49 PM
Wow, where to start...you will get a huge variety of responses based on our varied experiences.

Overall price - I'd expect CA to be the least reasonable. You can easily purchase out of state for much lower cost, but;
If you purchase out of state, you may struggle to get "warantee" work done at your local dealer. Trailer dealers are not like car dealers - they have NO obligation or desire to do your service work and you will likely end up at the end of a very long line at your local dealer after driving to AZ to make your purchase.
So, if you plan to do MOST of the work on your unit, then out-of-state purchase might make sense.
MSRP - there aren't any standards here. The dealer can pretty much do what he wants. I'd say, get "out the door" pricing from everybody and just ignore any MSRP pricing they try to use to impress you with some type of discount.
Out of town purchase requires your time, travel, expense all of which will need to be included in your budgeting.
If you go out of town, include a night or two close to the purchasing dealership - that way if you have a major issue (like the heater or fridge won't work), you can pop right back into the dealership.
New vs used? That's a personal preference and a crapshoot at best. Some won't consider sleeping on a "used" mattress. If you purchase used, you may need to replace a few things like the mattresses - include this in your budget. With used, you may just be inheriting someone else's unsolved problems. Or maybe not - who knows. It's better if you know the seller - maybe...
New units have massive depreciation the first couple of years - much worse than cars. So unless you have a relative or favorite dealer and purchase a new unit every year, you will likely be paying a premium for new.
New units do have appliance warrantees and come with the newest technology (maybe, and can be both good and bad).

So, as you can see, this is all really personal preference. I've had good experiences with both used an new equipment - but that's mostly because I set my expectations at a reasonable level and CHOOSE to enjoy the purchase knowing there will always be some PITA issues - part of life.

Good Luck!

jasin1
12-28-2020, 04:54 PM
Hi,

I have been going to local dealership and getting quote from local dealership. It seem like the local dealership is way more expensive then online website. like rvtrader or rvusa and some other dealership in UTAH and Arizona. It seem like CA have the highest price quote.

I have been reseraching that the MSRP they listed on the trailer at local dealership is fake or they can list whatever MSRP they want. Anyway example say a bullet 1700BH MSRP listed on the keystone website for: $21,398.

Dealership says the MSRP is $31,000. So I'm marking it down for you $26,950 + tax and doc fee of $350. So after tax and everything i'm looking around $28,500.

Now for the online price i saw on the same model listed for $22,500 in Utah and Arizona.

There is a huge gap here for purchasing it locally. Anyway my question is where can you get the best deal? where should you go looking? should I get a used trailer that is one year old? Or which website should I be looking? How do I bargain with them? Any insider hints or secret on this?

Please advise any good suggestions and advice for me to hunt down my dream trailer?

thank you
Is the keystone web msrp for a base model with no options?
The local dealer could have more options on his unit on the lot.
Of course it is manufacturers “suggested “ price
I looked at and was gonna buy a new mustang in 2012,Boss 302 Laguna seca...beautiful black car. Anyway they had it listed for $10000 over msrp sticker price.
I was still interested because I felt like it would be a collectors car one day. ( my idea of sound financial investing)
I showed up at the dealer and they said “ uh yeah I think we can get more for it “ so I walked

With shortage of rv’s I think they can sell whatever price they want to a degree

LewisB
12-28-2020, 04:57 PM
One other piece of advice:

Understand "payload" and all the other towing limitations for your tow vehicle.
Completely ignore both the car dealer and RV sales personnel and their towing claims. They are focused solely on separating you from as much of your money as they can.
It appears that you recognize that you MUST match the tow vehicle towing limitations and the trailer requirements. That's good - keep going that direction.

I've added this because you have asked the same type of questions in several different threads you have started. First it was a Passport 239ML, then a Bullet 2200BH, and now a Bullet 1700BH. Your tow vehicle is a Toyota Tacoma 2020 Tacoma trd sport 4x4. I am glad to see you are reducing your expectations regarding what you can tow with your Tacoma. Keep moving in that direction and you will ultimately find a reasonable and SAFE combination. In the mean time, instead of authoring a whole bunch of new threads every time the questions changes, just get one thread going and ask your questions. Otherwise, it looks like you are trying to manipulate the forum users. JMHO

wiredgeorge
12-28-2020, 04:58 PM
First time buyer of an RV? Most 1st timers seem to think buying new means no issues and that is far from the case. I would think about a used unit and have an RV savvy person go through any prospective purchase. Generally bad refrigerators and water leaks are the main gotchas and a person who knows campers can spot these things pretty easily. I have a 2002 and no issues since I have fixed and modified to where everything is good. And paid cash as a 2002 is a LOT less than a new camper. Once you get over about 6-8 years old, roof material condition is key as they start to go at about 10 years and much sooner without the proper maintenance.

jasin1
12-28-2020, 05:03 PM
First time buyer of an RV? Most 1st timers seem to think buying new means no issues and that is far from the case. I would think about a used unit and have an RV savvy person go through any prospective purchase. Generally bad refrigerators and water leaks are the main gotchas and a person who knows campers can spot these things pretty easily. I have a 2002 and no issues since I have fixed and modified to where everything is good. And paid cash as a 2002 is a LOT less than a new camper. Once you get over about 6-8 years old, roof material condition is key as they start to go at about 10 years and much sooner without the proper maintenance.

I know I read somewhere that new rvís spend the first two years at the dealer ironing out little or big problems..probably an exaggeration but I was advised to look at used because the issues could possibly be all worked out by first owner who grew weary from the experience..I just went with a new one cause it fit my needs

JRTJH
12-28-2020, 05:18 PM
Go to any two RV dealerships and compare the "MSRP sticker" that you'll find on the kitchen counter or hung from a cabinet handle. Neither of them will be "uniform"... In other words, the "window sticker" is not from Keystone (like the window sticker on a new Ford or RAM or Chevy truck)... Every dealership prints their own "window sticker" and every dealership is free to post any value they "think" they can get from the trailer....

Some dealerships include transportation as a separate line item, some add in "fabric and paint protection" as a line item, some don't, some include a "forever warranty" at no cost, (don't believe it as it's too good to be true) and some include a PDI, some charge you for the PDI....

So, trying to compare MSRP from dealership to dealership is like trying to compare apples and hen's teeth.... You simpy CAN'T !!!!!

As suggested, work with a "known and comparable cost"... Ask the dealerships for an "out the door, everything included cost"... and KNOW what that OTD cost includes... If you'll need a hitch, hitch installation and brake control installation, know if that's included in your OTD cost or if it's extra....

In short, ONLY COMPARE THE BOTTOM LINE FROM EVERY DEALERSHIP. I think you'll find that most are within $1000 or so regardless of where you buy.

aboyz
12-28-2020, 05:20 PM
Wow, where to start...you will get a huge variety of responses based on our varied experiences.

Overall price - I'd expect CA to be the least reasonable. You can easily purchase out of state for much lower cost, but;
If you purchase out of state, you may struggle to get "warantee" work done at your local dealer. Trailer dealers are not like car dealers - they have NO obligation or desire to do your service work and you will likely end up at the end of a very long line at your local dealer after driving to AZ to make your purchase.
So, if you plan to do MOST of the work on your unit, then out-of-state purchase might make sense.
MSRP - there aren't any standards here. The dealer can pretty much do what he wants. I'd say, get "out the door" pricing from everybody and just ignore any MSRP pricing they try to use to impress you with some type of discount.
Out of town purchase requires your time, travel, expense all of which will need to be included in your budgeting.
If you go out of town, include a night or two close to the purchasing dealership - that way if you have a major issue (like the heater or fridge won't work), you can pop right back into the dealership.
New vs used? That's a personal preference and a crapshoot at best. Some won't consider sleeping on a "used" mattress. If you purchase used, you may need to replace a few things like the mattresses - include this in your budget. With used, you may just be inheriting someone else's unsolved problems. Or maybe not - who knows. It's better if you know the seller - maybe...
New units have massive depreciation the first couple of years - much worse than cars. So unless you have a relative or favorite dealer and purchase a new unit every year, you will likely be paying a premium for new.
New units do have appliance warrantees and come with the newest technology (maybe, and can be both good and bad).

So, as you can see, this is all really personal preference. I've had good experiences with both used an new equipment - but that's mostly because I set my expectations at a reasonable level and CHOOSE to enjoy the purchase knowing there will always be some PITA issues - part of life.

Good Luck!

lewis.

Thank you for all the wonderfuly suggestions..with the out of state purchase, I need to drive there with the family and pick it up and spend 1 or 2 night in a nearby campsite. which will allow me to test out everything and if any issues just bring it back immediately. That will be a 300miles drive for me to pick it up. I can also have it delivered to my home for around $800.

But with the coroan virus on the raise, my wife wanted it to deliver. So we will have a third party deliverying the trialer to us. My question is if i find out any issues after i get it whos fault is it? not the dealer right? the dealer also says you can bring it to any dealer that handle keystone for warranty. (as you stated never trust the sale guy).

I would want to purchase a used one like 1 or 2 year old because of the price drop. But the wife like it new.. So I cannot argue about that. :)

This new first trailer purchasing is taking too much of my time to reserach.. I now know how the sale person get you when you are in their office dealing with number. After you are all worn down, thats how they get you to sign and leave :).. I feel the pain just typing now..

thank you again..

aboyz
12-28-2020, 05:23 PM
Go to any two RV dealerships and compare the "MSRP sticker" that you'll find on the kitchen counter or hung from a cabinet handle. Neither of them will be "uniform"... In other words, the "window sticker" is not from Keystone (like the window sticker on a new Ford or RAM or Chevy truck)... Every dealership prints their own "window sticker" and every dealership is free to post any value they "think" they can get from the trailer....

Some dealerships include transportation as a separate line item, some add in "fabric and paint protection" as a line item, some don't, some include a "forever warranty" at no cost, (don't believe it as it's too good to be true) and some include a PDI, some charge you for the PDI....

So, trying to compare MSRP from dealership to dealership is like trying to compare apples and hen's teeth.... You simpy CAN'T !!!!!

As suggested, work with a "known and comparable cost"... Ask the dealerships for an "out the door, everything included cost"... and KNOW what that OTD cost includes... If you'll need a hitch, hitch installation and brake control installation, know if that's included in your OTD cost or if it's extra....

In short, ONLY COMPARE THE BOTTOM LINE FROM EVERY DEALERSHIP. I think you'll find that most are within $1000 or so regardless of where you buy.

Thank you!! I will call up my dealership and online and ask for the OTD price and what is included in it. This way I know how much to pay.. thank you!! OTD price is the key..

aboyz
12-28-2020, 05:25 PM
One other piece of advice:

Understand "payload" and all the other towing limitations for your tow vehicle.
Completely ignore both the car dealer and RV sales personnel and their towing claims. They are focused solely on separating you from as much of your money as they can.
Know what tow vehicle you have BEFORE you pick your trailer. If not, recognize that you MUST match the tow vehicle towing limitations and the trailer requirements. If the largest vehicle you can live with is a 1/2 ton pickup, then the first bullet is massively important in your purchase decisions.

If you need help with this, come back here to the forum and tell us what you would like to do - get some assistance BEFORE you spend your money.

Lewis,

I have been posting in this forum asking what weight my tacoma can carried. Ofcourse I have came to a conclustion that I will be getting the keystone bullet 1700BH weight 3377lbs. As that is the best for my truck...

thank you..

KeystoneKal
01-14-2021, 08:39 AM
In 2015 I went to the RV show in Cleveland. Hideout 30 RLDS MSRP $30,000 Show sale price $19,999. Most trailers at show were discounted 25-30% on sticker. You placed order (January) and took delivery in April or May.
Only add on beside tax was less than 1,000. I noticed the same units advertised on the dealer lot were at least $2,000 more. If you look at pricing for your exact same unit on RV Trader you see a wide range of selling prices.

Westmonster
01-14-2021, 09:23 AM
Hi there, I live somewhat close to you and ran into the same situation. Check out the deals at Best RV Center in Turlock California. They have the model you are looking for at a substantially lower price. https://www.bestrv.com/New-Inventory-2021-Keystone-RV-Trailer-Bullet-Crossfire-1700BH-Keystone-RV-Bullet-7840635?ref=list. We took a weekend family road trip to Turlock in 2019 and purchased our fifth wheel from Best RV as they have the largest selection and the best prices by far.

bbells
01-14-2021, 09:57 AM
Your best deal will be to wait a year or two. Since covid campers have been selling out, therefore the price skyrockets.

Mikelff
01-14-2021, 11:04 AM
Hi,

I have been going to local dealership and getting quote from local dealership. It seem like the local dealership is way more expensive then online website. like rvtrader or rvusa and some other dealership in UTAH and Arizona. It seem like CA have the highest price quote.

I have been reseraching that the MSRP they listed on the trailer at local dealership is fake or they can list whatever MSRP they want. Anyway example say a bullet 1700BH MSRP listed on the keystone website for: $21,398.

Dealership says the MSRP is $31,000. So I'm marking it down for you $26,950 + tax and doc fee of $350. So after tax and everything i'm looking around $28,500.

Now for the online price i saw on the same model listed for $22,500 in Utah and Arizona.

There is a huge gap here for purchasing it locally. Anyway my question is where can you get the best deal? where should you go looking? should I get a used trailer that is one year old? Or which website should I be looking? How do I bargain with them? Any insider hints or secret on this?

Please advise any good suggestions and advice for me to hunt down my dream trailer?

thank you

You need to be aware, which you probably are, that buying new you will take about a 20% depreciation hit your first year, and almost that the second year. Personally, I would look for a used unit one or two years old. For your first RV, you will need to figure out if this is something you want to continue and typically if the bug bites you you will want to upgrade at some point. Generally, a used trailer will have a lot of the issues fixed. I would rather learn and get experience with a used unit than new. Repairs, whether warranty or not, will typically take weeks in the shop, so be prepared for that. If you buy new, NOT a good idea to have it delivered sight unseen, IMO. What will you do if you discover you need significant warranty repairs? The local dealer will put you at the back of the line, especially if it is a new trailer you did not buy from them. One of their first questions they will ask is did you buy it from them. If you take your own delivery new out of state, donít sign any paperwork until you have your known issues repaired FIRST. You will be first in line immediately. They only get paid once you sign the paperwork, so they will want to take care of things so they can close the sale. Going camping close to the dealer as soon as you can to discover new issues, and get familiar with your new trailer is a good idea. Don't expect the same quick service when you go back. You might need to plan on several days, or maybe even weeks, if they need to order parts. A good local dealer makes ALL the difference in world in the kind of service you receive. If you buy new try to buy local. Take at least 15% to 20% off MSRP to start negotiations. Even though there has been hi demand for RVís, they canít resist a ďbird in the handĒ serious buyer, so donít think you canít negotiate a better price. You can. DONíT piss off your sales person. They will do their level best to make a deal if they think you are a serious buyer. Be firm but pleasant and hold firm to your proposed price. I am always prepared to walk out the door if we are too far apart on price, but alway let them know that if they find they can get closer to my price I am willing to talk more. Check back in a couple days if you donít hear from them. If they wonít budge, then you have to decide if you are willing to pay their last price. If you buy used, which is my recommendation for first time buyer, have the trailer inspected either buy an experienced person you know, or a professional inspector. They inspect every nook and corner and will give you a full report of all repairs needed and detailed condition of the trailer. Cost you around $400 bucks but well worth it. Hope you get a good trailer for a good price. Safe travels!!

KeystoneKal
01-14-2021, 12:36 PM
My opinion. You can buy new and get about 20%+ off MSRP if you shop around. Or you can wait a year or two and buy the same trailer used for 20%+ off MSRP. Look at pricing on RVtrader. There are websites where you can rent a trailer from a private party. Find a model you think you like. Rent it. That way you can find what you like or don’t like about the RV of your dreams.

notanlines
01-14-2021, 01:50 PM
"You can buy new and get about 20%+ off MSRP if you shop around."
Better you should shop around and do better than 20%, closer to 25 or 30 unless you're looking at a hot model of RV.

sourdough
01-14-2021, 03:34 PM
"You can buy new and get about 20%+ off MSRP if you shop around."
Better you should shop around and do better than 20%, closer to 25 or 30 unless you're looking at a hot model of RV.


I wouldn't touch a new RV if they didn't drop at least 25-33% off msrp (and include a few incentives)....and I only buy new RVs.

JRTJH
01-14-2021, 04:51 PM
I would walk away from a 20% off MSRP deal unless that percentage was an out the door price on a trailer with an MSRP lower than about $25,000. OTD pricing is the trailer, freight, tax, dealer prep and all registration/fees rolled into the price. The example in post #11 is a MSRP of $30,000 and a "show price" of $19,999. That's a 33.3% discount and is typical of most "ready to deal" pricing reductions. Sure, there are some higher, some lower, but a 20% reduction would have any RV dealer smiling "all the way to his bank"....

blubuckaroo
01-14-2021, 05:47 PM
You can see the MSRP on the trailer web site. Ask to see the Dealer Invoice before wheeling & dealing.

Mikelff
01-14-2021, 07:19 PM
I would walk away from a 20% off MSRP deal unless that percentage was an out the door price on a trailer with an MSRP lower than about $25,000. OTD pricing is the trailer, freight, tax, dealer prep and all registration/fees rolled into the price. The example in post #11 is a MSRP of $30,000 and a "show price" of $19,999. That's a 33.3% discount and is typical of most "ready to deal" pricing reductions. Sure, there are some higher, some lower, but a 20% reduction would have any RV dealer smiling "all the way to his bank"....

To be clear I was talking about their best initial OTD price, not MSRP. MSRP means nothing.

sourdough
01-14-2021, 07:35 PM
To be clear I was talking about their best initial OTD price, not MSRP. MSRP means nothing.


You would probably want to double check your estimates or buy somewhere else. I didn't come close to that trading in a 6 year old RV bought new. My trade in allowance, 6 years later, was approx. 50% of my OTD price. If it lost 40% by year 2 it sure slowed down for the rest of the time.

Mikelff
01-14-2021, 09:21 PM
You would probably want to double check your estimates or buy somewhere else. I didn't come close to that trading in a 6 year old RV bought new. My trade in allowance, 6 years later, was approx. 50% of my OTD price. If it lost 40% by year 2 it sure slowed down for the rest of the time.

Yes and no. The depreciation slows considerably after about the fourth year. Actually the second year is about 15%-17% from what I have read. My neighbor and fishing buddy owns a good size RV dealer, and he basically confirmed this information. He gave me a hard time because I didnít buy from him but he didnít have what I was looking for. That's another story. The market for trade ins at the time you trade also has a bearing on your price. Dealers can play with numbers on trade in units for purchase of a new unit and do that all the time. A whole lot more wiggle room on the profit side for new units to make up for a higher price on a used trade in unit. Also, more price stability comes with the condition of the RV at time of trade in. Your trade in price of 50% of what you paid new on a 6 year old trailer was made up in profit on your new unit you traded for. If you were not trading for a new unit you would not have gotten that price, believe me. Iím betting your trade in was in great condition? If so, the dealer didnít have to put much in your trade in to sell it. On a 6 year old trailer in good condition they probably sold it for near what they had in it. A 6 year old trailer they will want to move off the lot as fast as they can. The profit margins in new RVís for the dealers is sinful. Thats why they can come off their ďMSRPĒ $20k or more, come off more to make a ď dealĒ for you, and still make a ton of money. Check the NADA dealer version and you will be close to the real value of the used RV. Kelly Blue book is worthless. Dealers donít use it. Because of covid, new and used units are in demand so they are not coming off prices like they did pre covid. Inventory got real tight and they held their prices, but its coming back a bit. Iím going to be curious about what the market will be like in 3,4, or 5 years when the people that bought all these RVís because of covid decide to dump them when things get back to ďnormalĒ. Might be a glut and prices will take a tumble. I guess time will tell.

Ken / Claudia
01-15-2021, 07:36 AM
Before the C-19 flu when Portland Or dealers were good at selling 40 units a month. They are now selling 200 a month, that is coming from a salesman. I am not sure many will take your lower price offer.
In my 40 plus years of RVing this was how you got the best price on a new RV.
Wait for the RV shows. Many large metro areas have 1 in the fall and 1 in the spring.
Both events create dealer/maker and loan incentives. If you have being shopping and looking at prices before and during those events. You will find prices around 1/3 off most MSRP. Yea, MSRPs mean nothing for several reasons, but that's a number they sure like you to see.

JGEORGE
01-15-2021, 08:17 AM
If your still looking, Someone previously posted about Best RV in Turlock. I've bought two trailers there. Price was always lowest I found but their service is poor at best. So if you want lowest price I would go there, if want after sale service Referral auto group in Escalon seems to be the place to go. I had one warranty claim on our first trailer and I just went to Los Banos rv dealer who took good care of us even thought we didn't buy there. So far our Bullet has been problem free a year and a half in. Good luck

travelin texans
01-15-2021, 08:41 AM
Just keep in mind that wherever you buy is where you'll need to return for warranty work. Unlike autos rv dealers are not obligated to do warranty repairs on units they didn't sell. That could seriously impact the price or savings if you have to travel a 1000 round trip for warranty work.
You may also want to check reviews on the service department of wherever you buy, they're the ones you'll be dealing with after the sale, the salesman won't remember your name 5 minutes after the sale.

sourdough
01-15-2021, 09:49 AM
Yes and no. The depreciation slows considerably after about the fourth year. Actually the second year is about 15%-17% from what I have read. My neighbor and fishing buddy owns a good size RV dealer, and he basically confirmed this information. He gave me a hard time because I didnít buy from him but he didnít have what I was looking for. That's another story. The market for trade ins at the time you trade also has a bearing on your price. Dealers can play with numbers on trade in units for purchase of a new unit and do that all the time. A whole lot more wiggle room on the profit side for new units to make up for a higher price on a used trade in unit. Also, more price stability comes with the condition of the RV at time of trade in. Your trade in price of 50% of what you paid new on a 6 year old trailer was made up in profit on your new unit you traded for. If you were not trading for a new unit you would not have gotten that price, believe me. Iím betting your trade in was in great condition? If so, the dealer didnít have to put much in your trade in to sell it. On a 6 year old trailer in good condition they probably sold it for near what they had in it. A 6 year old trailer they will want to move off the lot as fast as they can. The profit margins in new RVís for the dealers is sinful. Thats why they can come off their ďMSRPĒ $20k or more, come off more to make a ď dealĒ for you, and still make a ton of money. Check the NADA dealer version and you will be close to the real value of the used RV. Kelly Blue book is worthless. Dealers donít use it. Because of covid, new and used units are in demand so they are not coming off prices like they did pre covid. Inventory got real tight and they held their prices, but its coming back a bit. Iím going to be curious about what the market will be like in 3,4, or 5 years when the people that bought all these RVís because of covid decide to dump them when things get back to ďnormalĒ. Might be a glut and prices will take a tumble. I guess time will tell.


I understand, and know, what you are saying. I've bought countless new cars, trucks, RVs, homes, motorcycles etc. I've sat with good friends that were finance managers at an RV dealerships/auto dealerships and discussed the ins and outs of trading, buying etc. My son was a car salesman, then GM, then dealership owner etc. I know how to play both ends against the middle so I'm confident of my numbers any time I get ready to buy or trade.

I will say for folks doing this that NADA is a place to start but only a place to start. I've had better luck getting written offers from competing dealerships after a final negotiation then using that as a tool to get better pricing elsewhere. I've also found that I can get better deals in the East then use those to negotiate back in TX.....and they truly hate that because their delivered price is higher than it is here in the E.

Last trailer I bought (this one) was bounced back and forth pricing/trade wise between FL and TX. My negotiations were with the GM, not a salesman or finance guy. He said he couldn't match the E coast pricing so told him Marcus (CW) had advised that they (TX) would honor any warranty work as if I'd bought the trailer from him and was going to buy the FL unit. Came back with his last offer - he said he would NOT (verbally) meet the FL price (trade) out of principle but would offer me $25 less; he met the price for the new unit. In addition he would throw in mounting and dismounting the new tires (Sailuns), cutting down the bed frame to queen and installation of a new mattress I had purchased. Said he was beyond rock bottom and I believe him; I don't go into these things blindly or believe what I'm told without having ammo in my mag as well. Sales guy I started dealing with initially told me the GM told him he wouldn't be making anything off the sale which the GM confirmed so I took the sales guy aside, gave him some compensation on the side then took him out for a steak dinner so all was not lost. At the end of the day you gotta do your homework and know your business when doing these things or you will always come out on the bottom (and probably will to some degree anyway) - they have lots of little nooks and crannies to hide little pockets of "fluff" money for themselves.

Toat
02-18-2021, 05:38 AM
I'm also in the process of buying a 1700bh. From my experience ignore the MSRPs that you know are fake. The dealer's MSRP should basically be the price listed on the Keystone website plus the cost to get it from Indiana. That should also be what the NADA price is, and I think the NADA price seemed accurate for my zip code.

I was only able to negotiate to 77% of the NADA which all said and done comes to $21,500 delivered to my door, but I'm a little closer to Indiana than you. I hope that helps. It seems this is still a sellers market and dealers are content to sit and wait for a sucker. I had one dealer flat out refuse to negotiate after I got their best price and came back with a lower price quote from another dealer.

machz
02-22-2021, 06:42 AM
I just ordered a cougar 22MLS and as others have said ignore MSRP. I decided to send out email to anyone within a days drive from me. I hit the big ones like General, Haylett and several others. I told them that I was looking around and asked for a best price out the door. The all came in high so I started sending email from the lowest to the highest asking if they could beat the price.


So in the end the best was $29898 with Theater seats and slide toppers out the door. The RV MSRP is 35,805 but that doesn't include thinks like destination, prep, extras and dealer fees. This is where the pricing can vary a ton. as an example below is one dealers additional charges.


Delivery $999
Document $499
Dealer prep$495
Plate $6

$1999 just in extra fees.



In the end there were several thousand dollars between dealers so make sure you spend the time looking for a good deal.

notanlines
02-22-2021, 02:29 PM
I know this is a little old, but "On a 6 year old trailer in good condition they probably sold it for near what they had in it" Car dealers, RV dealers, motorcycle dealers, etc, NEVER sell for what they have in it. Who's going to pay the salesman? The overhead? You might be so naÔve as to believe what the salesman told you, but I believe our resident Arizona Danny would ask "Is the salesman's lips moving?"

hornet28
02-25-2021, 07:00 PM
I know this is a little old, but "On a 6 year old trailer in good condition they probably sold it for near what they had in it" Car dealers, RV dealers, motorcycle dealers, etc, NEVER sell for what they have in it. Who's going to pay the salesman? The overhead? You might be so naÔve as to believe what the salesman told you, but I believe our resident Arizona Danny would ask "Is the salesman's lips moving?"

True. But by the time they get done adding in all the BS charges they do make money. In this area when I looked at used unit at dealers they wanted an $1000 to "clean" the unit. I told him they should be doing that to sell it just as car dealers do. They all have a way of getting more money from buyers. That's why I avoid dealers as much as possible. I've never bought an RV from a dealer and in 60 years of owing vehicles have bought less than a dozen from dealers. I also do my own maintenance and most repairs