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Zac
12-09-2020, 02:06 PM
Hello, I have a 2007 Yukon XL 2500 with 4.10 gears. Iím looking to buy a Keystone Cougar 29í. https://www.rvusa.com/detail?id=2802227

My question is, am I safe to haul this trailer? I believe with 4:10 gears my Tow capacity is 9500lbs & payload 2500. The trailer dry weight is 6875 and GVWR is 8800. Should I think about any air suspension? Any help or tips would be great!

DevilDoc7898
12-09-2020, 02:10 PM
I put air bladders on the rear of my truck long ago to help with pulling a TT! I just pump them up and level the truck and trailer. I have a F150 and pull a 32 ft TT ultralight with little problem. Your 2500 should be just fine pulling the load. I would suggest installing air lift bladders to help bring the rear of the truck up when loaded

flybouy
12-09-2020, 02:51 PM
Hello, I have a 2007 Yukon XL 2500 with 4.10 gears. Iím looking to buy a Keystone Cougar 29í. https://www.rvusa.com/detail?id=2802227

My question is, am I safe to haul this trailer? I believe with 4:10 gears my Tow capacity is 9500lbs & payload 2500. The trailer dry weight is 6875 and GVWR is 8800. Should I think about any air suspension? Any help or tips would be great!

The camper is sold when you click on the link. Look on the door pillar for the stickers that show gross axle weights and payload. They are the only relevant numbers. Figure on about 13% of the trailer's gross weight not empty weight for the tongue weight. So GVWR of 8,800 lbs would be .13 X 8,800 for a tongue weight of ~1,200 lbs. Add another 120 lbs for a weight distributing hitch so about 1,300 to 1,.400 lbs. Subtract the from your payload number and also subtract everything else you put in the vehicle like wife, kids, dog, drinks, food, floor mats, EVERYTHING that wasn't in the vehichle when it rolled off the factory floor.

I'd be surprised if it has 2,500 lbs. opf payload but that door sticker will tell you exactly what it is.

Zac
12-09-2020, 03:13 PM
The camper is sold when you click on the link. Look on the door pillar for the stickers that show gross axle weights and payload. They are the only relevant numbers. Figure on about 13% of the trailer's gross weight not empty weight for the tongue weight. So GVWR of 8,800 lbs would be .13 X 8,800 for a tongue weight of ~1,200 lbs. Add another 120 lbs for a weight distributing hitch so about 1,300 to 1,.400 lbs. Subtract the from your payload number and also subtract everything else you put in the vehicle like wife, kids, dog, drinks, food, floor mats, EVERYTHING that wasn't in the vehichle when it rolled off the factory floor.

I'd be surprised if it has 2,500 lbs. opf payload but that door sticker will tell you exactly what it is.

Thank you. Here is a picture of the door sticker. And here is a link to the trailer I have 4.10 gearing which puts me at 9500lb https://www.trailerlife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Trailer-Life-Towing-Guide-2007.pdf

https://www.curtistrailers.com/inv/2021-Keystone-Cougar-Half-Ton-29BHSWE-Beaverton-OR-37400/

sourdough
12-09-2020, 03:44 PM
Some thoughts;

The TV is 13 years old. Putting a trailer maxing out its ratings behind it is stretching it IMO unless that Yukon has been gone over top to bottom. How many miles (and kind) on it, the tranny, rear end, engine etc. - but more importantly the suspension? Are the tires still the same size (LT) and in excellent shape? What is the receiver rated for?

It is the XL Yukon. I assume there is a reason. Large family; large loads in the vehicle? With almost 1300 lbs. used for just the tongue and hitch, what else is going in the vehicle?

You didn't give specs on the engine but did say it had a 4.10 (excellent if in good shape). I think the engine has maybe 350/60 lbs. of torque. Don't know where you intend to travel but with a vehicle that cumbersome and a trailer that big that engine will struggle if loaded on any inclines. And the engine needs to be in excellent shape because you will be whipping it pretty hard. At least the nemesis of an SUV, short wheelbase, is mitigated in the XL but you then have a big, heavy (read wallowing) vehicle trying to tow a 34' wind sail.

The question was can you tow it safely. You asked for any help or tips and those are my thoughts. I think it is impossible for anyone here to tell you yes or no unless we all know a LOT more than we do at the moment.

Zac
12-09-2020, 04:19 PM
Some thoughts;

The TV is 13 years old. Putting a trailer maxing out its ratings behind it is stretching it IMO unless that Yukon has been gone over top to bottom. How many miles (and kind) on it, the tranny, rear end, engine etc. - but more importantly the suspension? Are the tires still the same size (LT) and in excellent shape? What is the receiver rated for?

It is the XL Yukon. I assume there is a reason. Large family; large loads in the vehicle? With almost 1300 lbs. used for just the tongue and hitch, what else is going in the vehicle?

You didn't give specs on the engine but did say it had a 4.10 (excellent if in good shape). I think the engine has maybe 350/60 lbs. of torque. Don't know where you intend to travel but with a vehicle that cumbersome and a trailer that big that engine will struggle if loaded on any inclines. And the engine needs to be in excellent shape because you will be whipping it pretty hard. At least the nemesis of an SUV, short wheelbase, is mitigated in the XL but you then have a big, heavy (read wallowing) vehicle trying to tow a 34' wind sail.

The question was can you tow it safely. You asked for any help or tips and those are my thoughts. I think it is impossible for anyone here to tell you yes or no unless we all know a LOT more than we do at the moment.

I have kept up on the maintenance. It runs great. Itís a 6.0L. And has 130k miles on it. We actually have a small family, I bought the Yukon because it was a good deal and well kept. Here is the window sticker showing features.

wiredgeorge
12-09-2020, 04:56 PM
Your payload is 2154 lbs. Your camper must be a bumper pull. 8800 lbs willl give you about 1100 lbs load so add the hitch and passengers and cargo you put in your Yukon (not really sure what that is) but sounds like if the hitch receiver on your truck is rated for the weight (1100 lbs or more) then it appears from a load standpoint, you should be OK. Now how it will tow depends on how long your prospective trailer is, what type hitch you use and the wheelbase of your Yukon.

Zac
12-09-2020, 05:26 PM
Your payload is 2154 lbs. Your camper must be a bumper pull. 8800 lbs willl give you about 1100 lbs load so add the hitch and passengers and cargo you put in your Yukon (not really sure what that is) but sounds like if the hitch receiver on your truck is rated for the weight (1100 lbs or more) then it appears from a load standpoint, you should be OK. Now how it will tow depends on how long your prospective trailer is, what type hitch you use and the wheelbase of your Yukon.

Here is a picture of the hitch. Also, here are the details I found:

Yukon XL 2500 w/4.10 gearing
Maximum trailer weight = 9,500lbs
GCWR 16000 lbs
Payload 2154lbs
GVWR 8600


29BHS bumper pull TRAILER
Length 34′
Weight 7,050 lbs.
Dry Weight 6,875 lbs.
GVWR 8,800 lbs

Canonman
12-09-2020, 05:30 PM
My opinion, FWIW, your Yukon will pull the TT. Our kids have a similar set up with a Passport pulled by a Tahoe.
As you can see from my signature, I also have a 2007 truck. That said, it has only 60k miles on it. Have you considered what the next step is if the Yukon has a transmission issue, engine fail etc. The kids have had both over the years and neither are cheap. I guess what I'm saying is it would be wise to prepare for that "rainy day". Consider if something like that would be a budget buster or just a maintenance problem to be dealt with. Or, is this just a clever ploy to get the DW to let you get that new truck you've been eye-ballin:angel:

wiredgeorge
12-10-2020, 04:13 AM
If I read the hitch placard correctly, it doesn't look to be up to snuff.

chuckster57
12-10-2020, 05:24 AM
If I read the hitch placard correctly, it doesn't look to be up to snuff.

Looks like it to me too, 1000 pounds on the ball.

sourdough
12-10-2020, 06:38 AM
^^^^I agree with the above. Max weight on that hitch/receiver is 1000lbs. with a weight distributing hitch. Therein is another reason that SUVs just weren't built (or envisioned) as large RV towers - which must always be kept in mind by anyone contemplating doing so.

wiredgeorge
12-10-2020, 11:06 AM
Zac, is your hitch/receiver welded to the frame or bolted? If bolted, unbolt and get a hitch capable of the tongue weight installed. Since I don't have a clue about what a Yukon is, not sure if they are available or this is do-able. This hitch seems a better option and looks bolt on type:
https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Hitch/B-and-W/BWHDRH25124.html?feed=npn&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzan4sY3E7QIVC_HACh2CvQa5EAQYAyAB EgKRY_D_BwE


Curt makes one that is also a Class V and it has a 2700 lb tongue weight limit:
https://www.delcity.net/curt?id=Towing-Accessories-CURT15800&r_IF1003&mkwid=&crid=410099918330&mp_kw=&mp_mt=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzan4sY3E7QIVC_HACh2CvQa5EAQYBSAB EgImRfD_BwE


Of course, shop around, the ones I pointed out are just examples but I find etrailer.com always has good support, pricing, etc.