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JohnnyP
10-08-2020, 11:59 AM
What is best? I cannot even get to water pump without removing the stove or possibly the outside kitchen. 2010 cougar 26bhs. Am I missing an easy access to pump or should I just use air. 1st timer asking for help.

JDDilly
10-08-2020, 12:04 PM
I have only used air. We used antifreeze a couple times and hated the taste and smell for half the next season.

dwall
10-08-2020, 12:33 PM
I guess it depends on where you are. I am in South Georgia so all I do is drain and blow out the lines. I do pour a little antifreeze in the drains for the p trap. Not sure itís needed but I would rather be safe than sorry.

sourdough
10-08-2020, 12:56 PM
I'm like dwall, I only drain, blowout and antifreeze in the P traps here in W TX. Don't know if that would work in Indiana. Are you sure the water pump is that "hidden"? I've never had to remove a stove to get to one but guess there's a first time.

GMcKenzie
10-08-2020, 01:42 PM
I'm in Canada so I blow and antifreeze. But my pump is pretty easy to get to.

Northofu1
10-08-2020, 03:29 PM
Just antifreeze. Took one jug.

Terry W.
10-08-2020, 07:43 PM
Well I'm in the foothills of South Carolina I personally do both. I have on all my past units but guess I been lucky with access to water pump and water heater. Just my personal preference.

tech740
10-08-2020, 10:54 PM
I am in the middle of Michigan and I do both. Mine takes almost 3 gallons.

DocP
10-09-2020, 02:24 AM
I do both air and antifreeze, just for my personal peace of mind. Northeastern Ohio gets pretty cold in the winter. I ended up wasting an extra gallon of antifreeze last week - I forgot to close the outside shower valves before I went inside and turned the water pump on to draw the pink stuff. It sucked up the whole gallon and winterized the ground outside! It happens. :facepalm:

ChuckS
10-09-2020, 05:22 AM
I do both methods myself... of course drain water heater and bypass... also if you use the black tank built in flush make sure you blow that out with sir otherwise if water stays trapped in plastic anti siphon valve it will crack if it freezes and you will have a flood first time you use it next year..

I like to run RV anti freeze thru mine after blowing out because I want to make sure the water that might remain in the water pump is dispersed with anti freeze.. I also run a bit into both gray tanks and black tanks and leave a little in toilet bowel to keep toilet seal lubed...

If you have residential fridge with ice maker be sure to disconnect water line to it and drain and do reset on ice maker with air blowing thru city connection.

Resetting ice maker a few times forces it to cycle and open solenoid valve on water line to ice maker to displace any water in the ice maker solenoid valve and internal lines

flybouy
10-09-2020, 05:32 AM
Haven't hears of a fw pump that requires removing the stove but I guess anything is possible. Take a good look around, often there's a wood panel that can be removed to access the pump and this screws can hide in the dark.

I think it gets pretty cold in Indiana. I use air and antifreeze. Antifreeze is cheap, new fresh water pumps and plumbing isn't.

Gegrad
10-09-2020, 09:30 AM
I drain all the lines and WH, flip the bypass for it, manually pump antifreeze into the black tank flush, then pour the remaining 4.5 gallons in my FW tank and pump it through until deep pink. 5 gallons of antifreeze is $12; that's worth it to protect everything; have never had a problem in 5 years. Plus it takes less than 30 minutes to fully winterize it (I am young so I move fast, lol).

ehidle
10-17-2020, 01:48 PM
Well I'm in the foothills of South Carolina I personally do both. I have on all my past units but guess I been lucky with access to water pump and water heater. Just my personal preference.

I'm glad I saw this.. I'm in Seneca and have been arguing with myself about what to do to winterize my 30RKD when the time comes. I do have easy access to the bypass valves and the water pump drain so I am thinking I can just blow out and antifreeze the traps like others have said here.

wiredgeorge
10-17-2020, 01:55 PM
Doesn't matter what any of you do unless you live up in the frozen north. The issue is the location of the water pump. Maybe someone with a mid-decade 26BHS could pop in and tell him how to get to his water pump. It WILL be behind a panel that is held on by a couple screws. Mine is easy to get to as the water fill inlet is right above it where the pump is under a kitchen cabinet that is where the missus stores pots and pans. The panel is held by two screws but this info won't help the OP. Come 26BHS owners... step up and help this guy!

dljs1941
10-17-2020, 03:54 PM
Living in the Northeast, I blowout and add antifreeze as part of my winterizing process. Better safe than sorry. However Keystone engineer must have had a bad weekend when he decided to put the pump access behind a panel in the front storage compartment. I guess if your flexible, then not a problem... I also leave my WH in bypass mode at put a sticky note in my camper to remind me (don't want ANY antifreeze getting in there).

NH_Bulldog
10-17-2020, 03:58 PM
On the current model, the pump is in the bedside cabinet on the slide side of the camper. I can’t say that is where it was in the 2010 model, but either way there is access panel no matter where it is located.

I live in NH and have lived in Northern New England all my life. Our method of winterizing is to drain and bypass the water heater, blow out all of the lines with air, and then pump in antifreeze (takes about 2 gallons on mine including traps and toilet). My pump has an access panel under the front bed, but it’s easier to get to through the panel face on the bedside base cabinet. Then........I put a bucket under the low point drains and blow out the lines again with air and recapture most of the antifreeze for next year. I know the stuff is cheap, but it just makes it easier to de-winterize in the spring.

notanlines
10-18-2020, 02:59 AM
I see where you’re coming from, Bulldog, but your “ and recapture most of the antifreeze for next year. ” is not a practice I would recommend. You are saving diluted product, you are saving less than $5.00 total. This is the mark of a man taking long steps to save $40 shoes and splitting $60 trousers. Families have thousands invested in the RV, nothing to be gained by this practice.

NH_Bulldog
10-18-2020, 04:30 AM
If you blow the air out of the lines first, antifreeze isn’t even really necessary. We use the antifreeze on the odd chance some water remains in the system. Any potential dilution is negligible at best.

I am not doing it to save money, it’s just a method I have used for decades on my RV’s and at our seasonal camp deep in the North Woods. In aggregate, it costs me no more than a few extra minutes on the winterizing end, but saves me at least an hour and tons of water on the de-winterizing end. We are on well water and we have no eco-friendly way to drain and flush and dispose of used antifreeze “non-toxic” or not. As others have done, I simply shared a method I use and that has worked for me since the 1990’s without a single damaged plumbing line, fitting or appliance.

ChuckS
10-18-2020, 05:20 AM
We use both air and anti freeze... blow out all lines and low points with HWH in bypass.. the water heater gets washed out and new anode rod installed

I like to follow up with antifreeze in the lines because..
.. water pump will still have some residual water in it and the antifreeze displaces water plus keeps seals wet and lubed
.. we pour a bit down the sinks and leave some in the toilet bowl to keep its seal lubed
.. each gray and black tank gets a little anti freeze down it to keep gate valves lubed

Also if you have fridge with ice maker you will need to drain its water line and then run air thru system and reset ice maker a few times so water solenoid valve will open and purge remaining water out of ice maker mechanism.

Donít forget to blow air thru back tank flush receptacle is you use that...some water will remain 8n the anti siphon valve and it will freeze and crack

flybouy
10-18-2020, 06:14 AM
We use both air and anti freeze... blow out all lines and low points with HWH in bypass.. the water heater gets washed out and new anode rod installed

I like to follow up with antifreeze in the lines because..
.. water pump will still have some residual water in it and the antifreeze displaces water plus keeps seals wet and lubed
.. we pour a bit down the sinks and leave some in the toilet bowl to keep its seal lubed
.. each gray and black tank gets a little anti freeze down it to keep gate valves lubed

Also if you have fridge with ice maker you will need to drain its water line and then run air thru system and reset ice maker a few times so water solenoid valve will open and purge remaining water out of ice maker mechanism.

Donít forget to blow air thru back tank flush receptacle is you use that...some water will remain 8n the anti siphon valve and it will freeze and crack

Basically do this also. Just want to add, don't forget to blowout and run antifreeze thru the outside shower and kitchen if so equipped.

SummitPond
10-18-2020, 06:20 AM
OK - probably a silly question.

I use antifreeze, but if I wanted to blow the lines out instead, where do you inject the air?

Is there an adapter for the city water line to connect to the compressor line, do you use the antifreeze suction line on the FW pump, or is there something else?

Thanks.

flybouy
10-18-2020, 06:32 AM
There are adapters that have male hose thread on one end and quick disconnect male air fitting on the other. Connect to city water connection and make certain you regulate the air supply down to about 30 psi.

skids
10-18-2020, 07:43 AM
I would do the black tank flush inlet as well.

nellie1289
10-18-2020, 07:48 AM
Iíve only air winterized. If there is no water in the lines how can they freeze? Maybe a little residual water in the water pump? Iíve only done air for six years no issues.

SummitPond
10-18-2020, 04:35 PM
There are adapters that have male hose thread on one end and quick disconnect male air fitting on the other. Connect to city water connection and make certain you regulate the air supply down to about 30 psi.

Marshall, thank you.

Where do you get something like this adapter? We have one very small mom & pop RV store near us, and I don't recall seeing anything like that - but then again, I wasn't looking for it.

flybouy
10-18-2020, 04:49 PM
Marshall, thank you.

Where do you get something like this adapter? We have one very small mom & pop RV store near us, and I don't recall seeing anything like that - but then again, I wasn't looking for it.

Here's one on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Winterize-Motorhome-Camper-Travel-Trailer/dp/B017CM0134/ref=sr_1_3?crid=1HN6KBCYSZO85&dchild=1&keywords=rv+air+blowout+adaptor&qid=1603068422&sprefix=Rv+air+%2Caps%2C192&sr=8-3

Some Walmarts that have RV supplies carry them in the store as well.

JRTJH
10-18-2020, 04:49 PM
Here's one of many available. Most camping stores, even some in campgrounds have them, Amazon is a "common go to" place for them: https://www.amazon.com/Winterize-Connect-Threading-Blowout-Winterizing/dp/B07KSCB86J/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=rv+pneumatic+water+adapter&qid=1603068477&sr=8-1

JohnnyP
10-18-2020, 04:58 PM
Went back and looked for access to the pump located under stove. No screws in panel. There is a carbon monoxide detector on panel under stove so I removed it to confirm that the water pump is behind it. Can look through small hole that wires come out of and verified itís in there. All panels under sink are nailed from factory the panel under the fridge has the heater and a wall that comes all the way down to floor. Thinking to be safe I need to either remove oven, outside kitchen or cut the panel to gain access. Not sure why they placed pump in this location. Talked to previous owner and he would always dump 6 gallons in fresh water tank and fill lines that way. Not worried about price of 6 gallons but the residue left in tank is not best when 1st using for season.

Keystone half ton
10-18-2020, 05:56 PM
How much air pressure is ok to use on the water lines

flybouy
10-18-2020, 06:15 PM
Pressure is pressure, but you should hold it to about 35 psi in my opinion. More air pressure is not necessary.

wiredgeorge
10-19-2020, 04:49 AM
[/LIST]15]Iíve only air winterized. If there is no water in the lines how can they freeze? Maybe a little residual water in the water pump? Iíve only done air for six years no issues.

You will have water in your hot water heater tank so drain it. You will have water in your P traps under your sinks. I like to put some antifreeze into drains where there are P traps knowing that blowing out my water lines won't get the water out of the drains. We do get hard freezes once in awhile in the TX Hill Country and anticipate them by filling P traps after blowing out the water lines.

JDDilly
10-19-2020, 04:52 AM
I have only used air for at least 12 years. The best is no antifreeze taste the next year!

Black Bark
10-19-2020, 09:01 AM
Question on the black tank flush and blowing it out. Do you need to open the drain first or can you put 30psi or less thru without opening?

flybouy
10-19-2020, 09:15 AM
You should not have to open the black tank drain. The tank vent will allow the air from that rinser line to escape without issue.

skids
10-19-2020, 01:36 PM
Not worried about price of 6 gallons but the residue left in tank is not best when 1st using for season.

Start of season, sterilize.

1.Open the low point drain and drain it,
2. then run water into the FW inlet, let it drain,
3. fill it up with added Clorox to sanitize and run through lines and let sit for 12 hrs.
4. I like to also rinse out the HW tank then and add some of that chlorine water for at least 4 hrs.
5. Finally, repeat with fresh water to rinse out the chlorine water. Don't forget the other low points.

That pink stuff will not harm you. The smell of chlorine will not harm you either.

NMRandy
10-19-2020, 03:28 PM
If you do the anti-freeze only method, make sure to backflush the city water connection back to the outside connector. The connector is a check valve that usually has a pin in the center, that you can depress to open the valve. I get the pump started drawing anti-freeze, then shut the pump off, bleed off the system pressure, then I push the center pin on the outside connector to open the valve, and then have DW turn the pump on and let the flow go until I see the pink stuff, (usually a cup or two clear water comes out). I had to replace the city water connector because it froze and broke. The RV tech explained to me how to do this. That doesn't get the black tank flush, need air for that.

rhaney
10-22-2020, 07:23 AM
What is best? I cannot even get to water pump without removing the stove or possibly the outside kitchen. 2010 cougar 26bhs. Am I missing an easy access to pump or should I just use air. 1st timer asking for help.

AIR! Easy and ready to go if you decide to do an out of season trip. Nothing like RV'ing in West Kansas in November and December.

cenders
10-22-2020, 07:48 AM
I'm in Calgary, Canada (current temp is 14F) and I've only ever used Air to clear my lines. I do remove my water pump and manually drain it of water however.

I do like the fact that if the weather warmed up we could jump in and go... as using air is typically as easy as using antifreeze, and it is free.

I made a simple adapter to connect my air line to the city connection (compared to a 'push' style you can find for sale).

ChadZ
10-22-2020, 07:51 AM
Sorry to hear youíre having issues with winterization. It is shameful that they canít build these RVs with an easier way to winterize them . We bought a brand new Keystone 3121 RL Fifth Wheel and had many problems with winterization as well . That being said we recommend RV antifreeze . We know people that use both methods. They both work . I think itís a matter of preference but we feel RV antifreeze is a safer way to go than air. One way to winterize your camper with antifreeze might be to get the antifreeze into your holding tank. That way you donít have to dig for the demand pump. Wishing you the best of luck.

Hugo-H
10-22-2020, 07:52 AM
If you blow the air out of the lines first, antifreeze isnít even really necessary. We use the antifreeze on the odd chance some water remains in the system. Any potential dilution is negligible at best.

I am not doing it to save money, itís just a method I have used for decades on my RVís and at our seasonal camp deep in the North Woods. In aggregate, it costs me no more than a few extra minutes on the winterizing end, but saves me at least an hour and tons of water on the de-winterizing end. We are on well water and we have no eco-friendly way to drain and flush and dispose of used antifreeze ďnon-toxicĒ or not. As others have done, I simply shared a method I use and that has worked for me since the 1990ís without a single damaged plumbing line, fitting or appliance.




May I ask how you blow out the lines with air? (I have a Keystone 31 ft, 2016)

Mikelff
10-22-2020, 07:53 AM
Good info from everyone. Iím in Texas so I just use antifreeze. No compressor to blow out lines. Was wondering if a good tire pump compressor would work for that???

JohnnyP
10-22-2020, 07:55 AM
I took a short hose and hooked up to city connections. Set air pressure at 28lbs and then blew air into hose. Friend went and opened each water valve until all air. Opened low drain points removed water then turned on pump. A little water then ran out as well. Put air to black tank clean out. Dumped anti freeze in all p-traps. Did outside kitchen as well.

Batsman53
10-22-2020, 08:05 AM
My Dad has been RVing since 1961 and his only used air to blow out lines and gallon on antifreeze to pour in P-Traps and a little in gray and black tanks. The only time he had a problem was the ice maker on a big motor home and he's owned travel trailers, fifth wheels, Class C's and A's and a couple of 45 foot motor homes. He said the key was to use a checklist, plenty of air (continuous air flow not pressure), start from the farthest faucet to bleed. I've seen him run a compressor for an hour. I've adopted the same steps and never had a problem. I tried using just antifreeze one time and what a mess and took forever to get the taste out. But also we live in Tennessee and north Alabama.

2Wheels
10-22-2020, 08:17 AM
What is best? I cannot even get to water pump without removing the stove or possibly the outside kitchen. 2010 cougar 26bhs. Am I missing an easy access to pump or should I just use air. 1st timer asking for help.

I have been thinking about this lately. This is my first winter with my trailer but I use it 2-3 weekends a month and plan on the same cadence through the winter.

I'm not sure what I should do in my situation.

beeje
10-22-2020, 08:20 AM
I'll be the Oddball here again. I know I'll get flamed for it but here goes. I have always simply just put three to four gallons in the fresh tank pumped it through every fixture done takes 10 minutes. Zero chance of missing anyting left in the lines.

Yes in the spring I have to do several flushes to get the foam and taste out but that's no big deal. Like most we really don't drink the water anyway.

2Wheels
10-22-2020, 08:27 AM
Sorry to hear youíre having issues with winterization. It is shameful that they canít build these RVs with an easier way to winterize them . We bought a brand new Keystone 3121 RL Fifth Wheel and had many problems with winterization as well . That being said we recommend RV antifreeze . We know people that use both methods. They both work . I think itís a matter of preference but we feel RV antifreeze is a safer way to go than air. One way to winterize your camper with antifreeze might be to get the antifreeze into your holding tank. That way you donít have to dig for the demand pump. Wishing you the best of luck.

Mine has two lines underneath near the city water connection and the dealer told me those are for winterizing the unit.

ncstan
10-22-2020, 08:27 AM
If you use only air don't forget about the toilet and push the pedal down a few times or water might freeze in the valve and come spring you will be wondering why water is on your bathroom floor after hooking up the camper to water.

dalamarjj78
10-22-2020, 08:27 AM
What is best? I cannot even get to water pump without removing the stove or possibly the outside kitchen. 2010 cougar 26bhs. Am I missing an easy access to pump or should I just use air. 1st timer asking for help.

I found this thread where they discussed the same problem:

https://www.keystoneforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=353

From what they said there, you should at least have an access panel to get to the back of the water heater so you can bypass for winterization.

I've only used the antifreeze method but am considering blowing air this year just in case we have nice weather and want to go camping during the off season.

But we're in NC and the winters aren't near as bad as they are up north.

cavediver
10-22-2020, 08:34 AM
Good info from everyone. Iím in Texas so I just use antifreeze. No compressor to blow out lines. Was wondering if a good tire pump compressor would work for that???

It's not pressure as much as volume of air. I had a tire pump that would pump to 275psi, it would fill a tire in three days. No volume behind it. My guess is a tire pump alone might be a bad choice. I've used the air method for years, I do take my time and go through at least twice. I've not had a problem. I take my water pump out for the winter, I keep it in the house.

CaptainDave
10-22-2020, 09:12 AM
I use air,. I really liked this informational video done by the rvgeeks.

https://youtu.be/fyjFAFFe7xs

pstltaz
10-22-2020, 09:16 AM
I live in Virginia. I drain, then bypass the water heater and use antifreeze. I purchased an inexpensive pump from northen tool and equipment to push the antifreeze.

Javi
10-22-2020, 09:17 AM
Good info from everyone. Iím in Texas so I just use antifreeze. No compressor to blow out lines. Was wondering if a good tire pump compressor would work for that???

I just use my pancake compressor and turn the pressure down to 40psi .. Only antifreeze I use is in the pee traps and toilet bowl..

sdetweil
10-22-2020, 09:44 AM
on my Alpine, the cover for filter for the water pump is at the bottom, and no amount of air will empty it.. it cracked the 1st year, now use antifreeze..

packnrat
10-22-2020, 10:07 AM
guess i am lucky, where i live no need to ďwinterizeĒ a rv.
it can freeze where i live. ( 1000ft elv northern ca) sure we get a touch of snow...some years. but never a problem. maybe the water just drains out someplace i do not know about?

notanlines
10-22-2020, 10:07 AM
Beeje, I don’t know why anyone would flame you for that idea. One of the problems is not all RVs will pick up with just three or 4 gallons in the bottom of the freshwater tank.

WNY Bullet
10-22-2020, 11:37 AM
I blow mine out and pump through antifreeze. Blowing out the lines from my City Hookup bypasses the pump and debris filter so water is still in them and could cause damage. By blowing out the my lines first, limits the dilution of the antifreeze from the water already residing in the lines. And of course I also dump antifreeze in all the traps. My Black Tank Flush I just blow out.

getsomesun1
10-22-2020, 12:29 PM
Iíve only air winterized. If there is no water in the lines how can they freeze? Maybe a little residual water in the water pump? Iíve only done air for six years no issues.


Same here. Air and a little Anti freeze in P traps and toilet bowl. going on 5th year no issues.

jpwhite
10-22-2020, 01:19 PM
I'll chime in.. from Michigan.

I dump and flush all the tanks and the drain pipe.

I drain the hot water tank, turn off the exterior electric switch and put it in by pass mode.

My preference is to run antifreeze through all the water lines, including toilet, shower and washer and dryer hookups. The Montana has an freeze guard inlet that makes this convenient. It does need a good hose connection to get the pump to pull the antifreeze out of the jug.

I blow all the antifreeze out from every line. I hook the compressor up to the city inlet. I set the pressure regulator to between 40 and 50 psi. I have both a 110 VAC 150 PSI Porter Cable compressor and a 12 volt 150 psi ViAir 400P-RV compressor. The 110 unit has an outlet pressure regulator, I added a separate in line pressure regulator for 12 volt. As configured, both work fine.

I put another gallon down the drains to protect the drain lines and tanks.

If I don't have the time, such as returning too early from the south, I just blow the lines out using my ViAir.

Roy Finchville
10-22-2020, 03:11 PM
What is best? I cannot even get to water pump without removing the stove or possibly the outside kitchen. 2010 cougar 26bhs. Am I missing an easy access to pump or should I just use air. 1st timer asking for help.
I used to pump air and ended up with problems so instead I now use RV antifreeze. Bought a hand pump transfer pump from Harbor Freight for about $10 bucks. I and my son have used it for 4 years. Screw discharge end into city water connection and other end in rv antifreeze jug. Takes us about 1 1/2 gallons. Use the rest to pour in traps. Prior to starting we drain hot water heater and use valves on back of hot water heater to isolate it from the rest of the system. We start by opening faucet farthest from where I pump antifreeze. Then turn faucet off. Then move to the next one until pink juice comes from all.

Captainf2
10-22-2020, 03:47 PM
I live in New England, 3 TTs and on my 2nd FW, always do both, the sags in the pex will gather water, not bad if is on a straight piece but if its near a fitting is gone when it freezes. Sometimes you need to remove the drawers to access the pump. The black flush has the line vent that drains but your do diligence to do it completely makes for a happy spring. The pink smell sometimes depends on the brand, but you have a smell mix bleach and water, portions aren't much, flush through does double duty, sanitize and deodorize. Good luck and stay safe

jimborokz
10-27-2020, 04:42 AM
Our 5er has washer dryer prep. We don't have a washer but there are water lines to that location, capped off. Haven't seen anything on this here. Can water get up in those lines? Should I blow them out also, I use the air method.
Also if I turn on water pump while running air will air get in there and remove residual water?

WNY Bullet
10-27-2020, 04:59 AM
Our 5er has washer dryer prep. We don't have a washer but there are water lines to that location, capped off. Haven't seen anything on this here. Can water get up in those lines? Should I blow them out also, I use the air method.
Also if I turn on water pump while running air will air get in there and remove residual water?

I would connect a short hose to each fitting and blow them out to be safe.

German Shepherd Guy
10-27-2020, 05:03 AM
We just got back from our New Mexico adventure and the bottom fell out of the temperature here last night. Luckily got in on Saturday evening and had Sunday to winterize. Everyone was aware that the temps were going from 60 to -1 Sunday to Monday so when I looked I only had two gallons of antifreeze. Went to town (our town has a population of 500) and all the antifreeze had been bought and back ordered. So I blew out all the lines, drained the HWH, bypassed it and put what I had into the lines. I worked with my coat off on Sunday, highs in the 60s. Monday am, we woke to 12 inches of snow and a -1 temp. Today it will be sunny but the high is expected to be 25. So glad I had at least two gallons. Ran it through all the lines and hopefully enough in the drains. Going to the "city" on Thursday and plan to buy more then but have my fingers crossed that I was able to do what I could.

John originally convinced me that you should do both, blow out the lines and pink stuff. :bow:
I am now a big believer in that.

By Friday the highs will be back to the 60s and the lows in the 30s. I will find out then if my two gallons were enough.:angel: I have my fingers crossed.

JDDilly
10-27-2020, 05:16 AM
I use and adapter the goes into where your fresh water hose is connected and connects to my compressor hose. Set the compressor to 40lbs, I then go around and open every faucet (hot and cold) and the low point valves. I do this 3 or 4 times making sure no water is coming out. I then out antifreeze down the drains so the traps have antifreeze and not water in them. You also need to blow out you black tank rinse port in the same way.

flybouy
10-27-2020, 05:52 AM
Our 5er has washer dryer prep. We don't have a washer but there are water lines to that location, capped off. Haven't seen anything on this here. Can water get up in those lines? Should I blow them out also, I use the air method.
Also if I turn on water pump while running air will air get in there and remove residual water?

To answer your question..... If the washer/dryer prep has faucets then own them when you winterized. If it's a pipe with a nonremovable cap then I wouldn't be concerned.

As for your water pump no, air will not back feed into it. There is a check valve that prevents water from the city water to back flow thru the pump and fill the FW tank. The only way to ensure the pump doesn't freeze is to run antifreeze thru it.