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Frisbeekev
09-28-2020, 08:01 AM
Like some other places in the US my kids and doing distance learning,and my wife is trying to teach on theine also. We have been thinking about going somewhere for a week and let them do their learning and teaching from somewhere else. We all know many campgrounds wifi is spotty at best sometime. Iwas thinkibg of getting an RV wifi booster. Has anyone had any experience with these? Could they do what they needed(online work,zoom,etc) with one or will they not be strong enough?

Another solution I thought would be to hook a generic wireless router to the campground coax at my site, but I don't know if that will work either.

Frisbeekev
09-28-2020, 08:25 AM
We literally live on the road for a month or two at a time in our truck and we carry our modem and use it all the time. Very few places it doesn't work on the AT&T network. We have a 3000 watt inverter that provides power to it and microwave, TV, etc.

We are trying to not use our cell phone data as we are on a prepaid plan

K_N_L
09-28-2020, 08:27 AM
I worked remotely from campgrounds for the month of August and part of September, WIFI varies greatly from one campground to the other, at some locations we had 25Mbps download and at other barely a 1Mbps (typical home cable is between 30 - 100Mbps). It would be best to contact the site directly if WIFI is your only connectivity method. If you have a good data plan you can hotspot off your phone but it may get costly. A couple of sites had pay for premium wifi access for small fee.

I did install a KING WIFI repeater in our unit to keep the configurations in check between campsites and it did surprisingly well. All the phones, tablets, laptops, Roku, and smart TV all connect to that device and relays it to the parks WIFI. This allow us to appear to be only using 1 device on the premium wifi sites. The setup is pretty simply.

Dont expect that a you will be able to get anything with a cable modem to the parks system, most cable operators need to authorize the addressing of the device before it allow you to pass traffic. There are some very complex network setups available for both LTE and WIFI if you truly need internet full time. We were pretty lucky in the campgrounds we stayed in.

Badbart56
09-28-2020, 08:28 AM
We literally live on the road for a month or two at a time in our truck and we carry our modem and use it all the time. Very few places it doesn't work on the AT&T network. We have a 3000 watt inverter that provides power to it and microwave, TV, etc.

Dhuhn
09-28-2020, 08:33 AM
Most RV park WiFi are slow I don’t think a booster will help that much. You would be better off with using cell data which would be faster and more reliable.

flybouy
09-28-2020, 09:29 AM
Any wifi "booster" is only as good as the wifi it's "boosting". Most cgs have the wifi throttled back to keep the throughput down and prevent video streaming. Whatever you investigate, remember that you will be streaming 3 devices all day. That's a LOT of data.

dutchmensport
09-28-2020, 09:46 AM
My wife has been working from home (exclusively) for over 5 years now. I've had the ability to work from home for years and years also. Because we do work from home, we had to ensure we had a back-up plan for when our internet goes down. We live in the country and have a line-of-site system, that is not cable or satellite or over phone wires. We live in a very pocketed area where outside providers, like AT&T, Verison, and others cannot establish wired phones. We also are in a pocketed area where no cable company will come through either, unless we are willing to pay thousands and thousands of dollars to run a line a couple miles to our house.

That leaves us with this line-of-site system, which works very well, except when "things" happen ... like power outages, or someone runs into a telephone pole and knocks out half our county, or they are doing service on the cell towers, or internal upgrades.

So, we wanted a back up plan. We ended up beefing up our phone WIFI hot spot data plan to an unlimited plan. Yes, it costs, nothing is free! But it's never failed us either.

Since Covid started, I've been working from home exclusively also, ever since. So, we take our phones with us when camping, have all our computers, I-pads, and Ruku televisions set up to recognize both my wife's phone hotspot and mine. With that said, anywhere we have cell phone service, we have internet service. And when camping, it sure is nice! In 261 days, I plan to retire and then we're hitting the road as full time as possible. She will continue to work from home -- on the road.

We've tested the waters multiple times, taking extended weeks working from the camper, when no one in the office was the wiser that we were 300 miles away from home! Phone hotspot WIFI is the way to go.

You have to make a decision what is most important. You could just stay at home and be safe. You can run a gamble on campground wifi service. Or, you can be "pretty sure" you have service by using your phone hot spot. It's really a matter of how much you want to "gamble" and how much you are willing to pay for a more secure path.

Me? I'm not a gambler. I pay the price. There's an old saying that states, "You get what you pay for."

sourdough
09-28-2020, 01:33 PM
My wife has been working from home (exclusively) for over 5 years now. I've had the ability to work from home for years and years also. Because we do work from home, we had to ensure we had a back-up plan for when our internet goes down. We live in the country and have a line-of-site system, that is not cable or satellite or over phone wires. We live in a very pocketed area where outside providers, like AT&T, Verison, and others cannot establish wired phones. We also are in a pocketed area where no cable company will come through either, unless we are willing to pay thousands and thousands of dollars to run a line a couple miles to our house.

That leaves us with this line-of-site system, which works very well, except when "things" happen ... like power outages, or someone runs into a telephone pole and knocks out half our county, or they are doing service on the cell towers, or internal upgrades.

So, we wanted a back up plan. We ended up beefing up our phone WIFI hot spot data plan to an unlimited plan. Yes, it costs, nothing is free! But it's never failed us either.

Since Covid started, I've been working from home exclusively also, ever since. So, we take our phones with us when camping, have all our computers, I-pads, and Ruku televisions set up to recognize both my wife's phone hotspot and mine. With that said, anywhere we have cell phone service, we have internet service. And when camping, it sure is nice! In 261 days, I plan to retire and then we're hitting the road as full time as possible. She will continue to work from home -- on the road.

We've tested the waters multiple times, taking extended weeks working from the camper, when no one in the office was the wiser that we were 300 miles away from home! Phone hotspot WIFI is the way to go.

You have to make a decision what is most important. You could just stay at home and be safe. You can run a gamble on campground wifi service. Or, you can be "pretty sure" you have service by using your phone hot spot. It's really a matter of how much you want to "gamble" and how much you are willing to pay for a more secure path.

Me? I'm not a gambler. I pay the price. There's an old saying that states, "You get what you pay for."


Dutchmen - who is the provider and when did you get the unlimited plan? I ask because I use Verizon and read about these unlimited data plans using the phone as a hotspot. I was told at the local Verizon store initially that, yes, I could get it. I then questioned throttling at about 15g as I was told by one rep. After hem hawing he said yes, it would throttle back at about 15g. I would get it so DW can watch Netflix when traveling but 15g won't get you far. I then checked 2 other Verizon stores and was told the same thing. If in fact throttling occurs that might be a consideration for someone with kids distance learning that can't afford to be throttled.