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Gobirds38
07-30-2020, 09:40 AM
How many of you use blocks under the jacks?

Are they more stable fully extended with minimal blocks or do you use many blocks and only partially extend the jacks?

wiredgeorge
07-30-2020, 09:45 AM
I use 2x12 cribbing (cut into squares) and doubled (for just under 4" thick) under my scissor jacks as they are pretty much at the end of their travel if extended all the way. I also tacked some loops of para cord on so I can pull them out without fuss. I also put some of those yellow stacking blocks under my 5th wheels front legs as needed for leveling and distributing the weight a bit.

pikespeakviewer
07-30-2020, 10:15 AM
This summer we've started using cribbing as well. Prior to this we used a block that was about 2" thick and then extended our scissor jacks until they reached the wood. We never really got rid of the shaking when the kids moved in their bunks.

With the cribbing (exact height depends on the site), we extend the jacks much less (about 15") and the shaking has been drastically reduced. I read somewhere that extending between 13-23" is ideal? Hopefully this is right.

NH_Bulldog
07-30-2020, 11:03 AM
The less the stabilizers are extended, the better. I have a few sets of the yellow “Lego” blocks accumulated from a lifetime of camping so I typically put a stack of 5-10 under each stabilizer.

mcmeadows1
07-30-2020, 11:11 AM
We use 4x6 blocks, cut to about 10 long, to use under the stabilizer jacks. Between the blocks and the ground, we use thick (1) rubber (recycled tires) pads, about 12 square. This provides a level surface for the jacks to mount on, minimizes the amount of dirt, mud, water which comes into direct contact with the jacks, and minimizes the chance of establishing a relatively easy electrical path from the RV to the ground.

I freely admit that last point may not be scientifically accurate, but using the blocks and pads certainly wont cause any harm either.

Also, using the rubber pads helps to protect the ground surface, especially asphalt, from damage caused by the jacks.

Finally, we also use the blocks and pads under the RVs front jacks, for the same reasons as outlined above.

FlyingAroundRV
07-30-2020, 12:21 PM
We use the lego type stacking blocks for a couple of reasons
1) They have a larger area thanthe base of the stabilizer which reduces the chances of the stabilizers sinking into soft ground
2) We use them to compensate for differences in ground level.
3) They keep the metal feet of the stabilizers off wet ground which would eventually lead to rusting.
But the stabilizers alone aren't the answer to redicing the wobbles. We use X chocks on the wheels as well. They made much more difference than the factory stabilizers.

flybouy
07-30-2020, 01:03 PM
We use 4x6 blocks, cut to about 10 long, to use under the stabilizer jacks. Between the blocks and the ground, we use thick (1) rubber (recycled tires) pads, about 12 square. This provides a level surface for the jacks to mount on, minimizes the amount of dirt, mud, water which comes into direct contact with the jacks, and minimizes the chance of establishing a relatively easy electrical path from the RV to the ground.

I freely admit that last point may not be scientifically accurate, but using the blocks and pads certainly wont cause any harm either.

Also, using the rubber pads helps to protect the ground surface, especially asphalt, from damage caused by the jacks.

Finally, we also use the blocks and pads under the RVs front jacks, for the same reasons as outlined above.
I would think that using a rubber pad under the stabilizers would make them less stable. The idea of the stabilizer is to provide a "hard point" between the frame and the parking surface. Using the wood or plastic blocks will disperse that weight over a larger surface area thereby reducing the chances of the stabilizer pad sinking into a soft surface. Those same devices will help stabilize by reducing the amount the stabilizer needs to extend.

As for "electrical isolating" the camper I'd prefer the camper frame Carty a lightning strike or other currency to ground via the stabilizer than thru me.

travelin texans
07-30-2020, 03:02 PM
The less the stabilizers are extended, the better. I have a few sets of the yellow “Lego” blocks accumulated from a lifetime of camping so I typically put a stack of 5-10 under each stabilizer.

Same here!
Started out using 4x6" blocks, but got tired of the weight & the amount of storage space they took up, so started accumulating the Lynx levelers new, from garage sales & fellow rvers leaving them behind, was able to store about 20-25 in about the same area as 2 - 4x6" blocks & weighed considerably less.
My last 5th wheel had the auto level system & I used my collection of about 30 under the 6 six jacks, more on the low side jacks. IMO the less the jacks extended the more stable the coach felt.

Bill-2020
07-30-2020, 06:48 PM
W
But the stabilizers alone aren't the answer to redicing the wobbles. We use X chocks on the wheels as well. They made much more difference than the factory stabilizers.

I'll second that comment on the BAL X-Chocks. I got in a deal for two at nearly the price of one last fall. They make a huge difference. Although it's a short 25 foot trailer, I use both of them. More the merrier.

NH_Bulldog
07-30-2020, 06:53 PM
We went a step further; BAL Extended X-Chocks and JT StrongArms

Gobirds38
07-30-2020, 06:53 PM
I am having problems finding X chocks for a spread axle TT.

Bill-2020
07-30-2020, 07:00 PM
I am having problems finding X chocks for a spread axle TT.

BAL makes two sizes. Check Amazon and Camping World.

Bill-2020
07-30-2020, 07:04 PM
We went a step further; BAL Extended X-Chocks and JT StrongArms

I installed the BAL version of the JT Strong arms on all four corners. One trip I was in a rush trying to set up the outside and beat the coming rain, I never locked the arms, just set the x-chocks. I realized this when we were packing up to leave a few days later and thought to myself that the trailer was still very stable. Funny what you discover by mistake.

Gobirds38
07-30-2020, 07:06 PM
We went a step further; BAL Extended X-Chocks and JT StrongArms

Where did you find your X-Chocks?

JRTJH
07-30-2020, 07:17 PM
Where did you find your X-Chocks?

Here is one source: https://www.amazon.com/BAL-28014-X-Chock-Locking-Chock/dp/B00B2ATTUE/ref=sr_1_6?crid=2OCII74FY9JZT&dchild=1&keywords=x+chocks+wheel+stabilizer+for+travel+trai lers&qid=1596165323&sprefix=x+chocks%2Caps%2C195&sr=8-6

You can also find them at any CW store and at most RV parts stores. WalMart does not carry them in the store, but they are available at WalMart.com. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Bal-Products-28014-X-Tended-X-Chock-Tire-Locking-Chock-with-17-Extension-for-RV-Trailers/50279042

Gobirds38
07-30-2020, 07:18 PM
BAL makes two sizes. Check Amazon and Camping World.

Thanks found them on Amazon.

tech740
07-30-2020, 07:35 PM
We use 2-6x6 next to each other under each leg. Added a short section of ratchet strap as a handle. Secure with a screw and washer. Jacks are much more stable with less extension. That and X-Chocks took out most movement.

Huntme
07-30-2020, 08:20 PM
I use one stabilizer jack,on my port side,and one on my starboard side,less than half way down,most times,and it works well for me.

Millertyme76
07-31-2020, 02:48 AM
I use a half cinder block with an orange lego on top at each corner. They have some weight but are easy to handle. I have plenty of ccc so the weight is not an issue for my set up.

https://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/concrete-cement-masonry/construction-concrete-blocks/8-two-quarter-half-block/1794357/p-1444441450256-c-5647.htm

SummitPond
07-31-2020, 05:04 AM
I use a dollar store cutting board beneath each of my orange lego block pads. I found the pads will sink into the ground, especially if the ground is wet from rain. The cutting boards provide more surface area for the legos to rest on and are not "hollowed out" so they resist sinking into the ground better while providing a good firm surface for the legos. Be sure to get cutting boards of sufficient thickness; if they're too thin they'll just warp and sink in (ask me how I know).

sourdough
07-31-2020, 07:46 AM
^^^^The above has always been an issue for us with the lego blocks. The hollowed out areas will sink into the ground once you get inside the trailer. I used a section of 2x12 but the cutting board solution sounds much lighter.

JSisemoreTX
08-06-2020, 07:38 AM
I use x-chocks on the tires, standard wheel chocks for the tires. For stabilizer jacks I like to use blocks so the stabilizers have less distance to travel. The end result is that they are wider, which is more stabilizing (side to side) than if they go all the way to the ground. Make sense?

TinaMBee1
08-06-2020, 08:13 AM
This summer we've started using cribbing as well. Prior to this we used a block that was about 2" thick and then extended our scissor jacks until they reached the wood. We never really got rid of the shaking when the kids moved in their bunks.

With the cribbing (exact height depends on the site), we extend the jacks much less (about 15") and the shaking has been drastically reduced. I read somewhere that extending between 13-23" is ideal? Hopefully this is right.

what is cribbing?

Khorsam
08-06-2020, 08:21 AM
I had been using those plastic blocks but I found I was not getting the stability I wanted. So, I built my own. Cost me about $60 all in, and I have 6 solid stabilizer blocks.

So much better when I have a solid base.

Beemer Phil
08-06-2020, 08:24 AM
Agree with above post that the less that the scissor jacks are extended the more stable they are. I dont think youll ever get rid of all the shake unless the whole dam thing is up on cement blocks and the wheels are off!

rodgebone
08-06-2020, 08:25 AM
I use x-chocks on the tires, standard wheel chocks for the tires. For stabilizer jacks I like to use blocks so the stabilizers have less distance to travel. The end result is that they are wider, which is more stabilizing (side to side) than if they go all the way to the ground. Make sense?

Also my method. x-chocks are a must for both stabilizing AND hitching/unhitching - don't trust regular chocks alone as they can slip'n slide (especially on concrete). I will use anything that doesn't dig into the ground to reduce the scissor jack's extension length (wood blocks, chocks and Andersen levellers/jacks turned sideways, etc, etc, etc). I've even used a chunk of firewood. anything to keep the scissors up high helps.

flybouy
08-06-2020, 08:54 AM
what is cribbing?

Stacking wood like Jenga blocks to create a piling for a stabilizer jack to set on.

crowbar
08-06-2020, 09:30 AM
Since I flipped the axles to gain more height, I use a 6x6 block under each stabilizer so I don't have to extend them too much. I run them down as much as my wimpy portable drill will take them and then go around with the supplied wrench for a turn to make them tight. Works good for me.

dutchmensport
08-06-2020, 09:39 AM
I have always used wood under my jacks and tires. Sometimes the campsite pad is so unlevel, you'd have to have $500 worth of Lego Blocks to form a stack high enough. Solid lumber is just that ... solid ... and the shorter the jacks have to extend, the less shake there is in the camper. I've been using these same blocks for the past 20 years. I just keep painting them. They came from a support beam out of a 100 year old barn that was being torn down. The wood was so hard, I had to cut them to length using a chain saw. But I'll never part with them. So solid (and heavy):


Previous camper:


https://i.imgur.com/lmI73yo.jpg

Current camper. Even though it has the 6 point leveling system, I still use the blocks under the jacks. Higher stack of solid lumber and shorter jack extention = always better!

https://i.imgur.com/DmS5YfG.jpg

jimborokz
08-09-2020, 06:21 AM
I have always used wood under my jacks and tires. Sometimes the campsite pad is so unlevel, you'd have to have $500 worth of Lego Blocks to form a stack high enough. Solid lumber is just that ... solid ... and the shorter the jacks have to extend, the less shake there is in the camper. I've been using these same blocks for the past 20 years. I just keep painting them. They came from a support beam out of a 100 year old barn that was being torn down. The wood was so hard, I had to cut them to length using a chain saw. But I'll never part with them. So solid (and heavy):


Previous camper:


https://i.imgur.com/lmI73yo.jpg

Current camper. Even though it has the 6 point leveling system, I still use the blocks under the jacks. Higher stack of solid lumber and shorter jack extention = always better!

https://i.imgur.com/DmS5YfG.jpg

That first step on the second picture is a doozy. What are you using to support the MorRyde step beyond the leg?

retiredusps69
08-14-2020, 04:40 PM
My son welded another set of stabilizers just ahead of the front axle, really stopped the rocking out almost like it was set on cinder blocks.