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steve james
06-05-2020, 05:24 AM
Simple question probably complicated answer. I have a 2019 22RBSWE Cougar TT . I was pulling it with my 2012 Tundra (9800 LB tow pkg) which did a great job. I was looking at the 1500 2021 Chevy Silverado to replace my Tundra. It has a 12000 LB tow pkg. Then we decided on the Chevy 2021 Tahoe High Country 6.2L with Max tow Pkg. It comes with a 8100lb tow rating. The builds were almost identical but the tow ratings weren't even close . 12000 vs 8100, 4000lb difference ? Also i couldnt find the hitch load for the Tahoe. Is there a formula to figure that out ? Thanks for your your input.

camper 2010
06-05-2020, 05:43 AM
As of May 4, 2020, The hitch weight hasn't been released. The max payload is listed as 1671 lbs. This includes passengers, cargo, and hitch weight.

sourdough
06-05-2020, 07:45 AM
First Tahoe vs Silverado in the towing world is like apples vs oranges. The truck is meant/built for towing/hauling. The Tahoe is built for comfort, groceries and going to the store. The towing differences reflect that along with the increased weight of an SUV vs an open bed pickup.

Look at the specs for that Silverado and see what class hitch it comes with with whatever package it has; class III, IV etc. That will give you some guidance on the receiver itself. The brochures will probably give you the max weight for the hitch with or without a weight distributing hitch. Without looking at a specific truck all you can do is spec out the truck you want and see what they say the payload is; which is what you need to go by. Completely, totally forget about the max tow rating for either vehicle - it is meaningless and will have zero bearing on the vehicle YOU will be buying.

You are wise to replace the Tundra with the Silverado (Tahoe not so much). The Silverado will be much more capable at towing than the Tundra.

ajlight
06-06-2020, 07:09 AM
The Tahoe probably has coil springs for smooth riding, The truck will have leaf springs that can handle payload much better,
Been there done that!

NH_Bulldog
06-06-2020, 07:33 AM
My good friend bought a brand new Tahoe, towed his camper once and brought it back to the dealer and swapped it for a 3/4 ton truck. The Tahoe wheelbase is too short and the suspension is too “squishy”. I had a 2007 Z71 Tahoe and it rode great but when towing with it, it was always the tail wagging the dog. The first time it happened, the DW laid down the law and “forced” me to get. 3/4 ton.

Grantmc1
12-18-2020, 08:11 PM
I saw the comments on the issues of towing with a Chevy Tahoe i.e. "The tail wagging the dog." I'm considering the purchase of a Keystone Cougar 26RBS which is 29' 11" and 6604 lbs. dry weight. I don't have a tow vehicle yet and need don't want a truck since I need the functionality and seating capacity of an SUV when not towing. The Tahoe can tow 8,400 lbs. The longer Suburban can tow 8,100 lbs, but doesn't fit in my garage. The Ford Expedition is longer than the Tahoe and shorter than the Suburban and can tow 9,300 lbs. The RV salesmen only talk about weight, not length and say that the loaded RV should be 1,000 lbs under the towing capacity of the vehicle.
I'd appreciate any comments on potential issues I might be facing with any of these 3 vehicles. Thanks!

Bill-2020
12-18-2020, 08:43 PM
Simple question probably complicated answer. I have a 2019 22RBSWE Cougar TT . I was pulling it with my 2012 Tundra (9800 LB tow pkg) which did a great job. I was looking at the 1500 2021 Chevy Silverado to replace my Tundra. It has a 12000 LB tow pkg. Then we decided on the Chevy 2021 Tahoe High Country 6.2L with Max tow Pkg. It comes with a 8100lb tow rating. The builds were almost identical but the tow ratings weren't even close . 12000 vs 8100, 4000lb difference ? Also i couldnt find the hitch load for the Tahoe. Is there a formula to figure that out ? Thanks for your your input.

Steve - I'm surprised your Tundra is/was only 9800 pounds. I just bought a F250, used to have a Tundra and it was 10,100. I can't speak for how the two brands in a 1/2 ton truck tow, but I'm about to find out. My Tundra did very well with the Passport, but you're Cougar is a heavier TT.

flybouy
12-19-2020, 05:17 AM
I saw the comments on the issues of towing with a Chevy Tahoe i.e. "The tail wagging the dog." I'm considering the purchase of a Keystone Cougar 26RBS which is 29' 11" and 6604 lbs. dry weight. I don't have a tow vehicle yet and need don't want a truck since I need the functionality and seating capacity of an SUV when not towing. The Tahoe can tow 8,400 lbs. The longer Suburban can tow 8,100 lbs, but doesn't fit in my garage. The Ford Expedition is longer than the Tahoe and shorter than the Suburban and can tow 9,300 lbs. The RV salesmen only talk about weight, not length and say that the loaded RV should be 1,000 lbs under the towing capacity of the vehicle.
I'd appreciate any comments on potential issues I might be facing with any of these 3 vehicles. Thanks!

Welcome to the forum. To answer your question you will have problems towing a 30' trailer with ANY suv. SUV's are designed to haul people in comfort not large travel trailers. SUV's typically have P metric tires with 30 some lbs of air in them. A truck designed to haul a travel trailer will have LT tires inflated to 55 lbs or more. Soft squishy riding passenger car tires (P metric) will flex excessively under load and contribute to sway.

Look at the numbers. First ignore what ANY salesman tells you. Most don't have a clue and will use the numbers to get the largest amount of money out of you. The only number on the trailer that matters is the GVW i.e. Maximum loaded weight. The trailer will never be at empty or "shipping weight" after it leaves the factory. That empty Wright doesn't even include the battery, LP tanks or spare tire. Then you have to think about all the other stuff the factory doesn't supply like water hose, waste water drain hose, tire chocks, leveling blocks, patio mats, and on and on.

Now you move inside. You'll need food and drinks, pots/pans, cooking utensils, plates, cups, cutlery, dish detergent and scrub brushes, pillows, blankets, sheets, towels, soaps, toiletries, cloths, shoes, toys/entertainment for the kids, and the list goes on and on. Basically you need to replicate the stuff you use daily in the house plus.

Second travel trailer number is tongue weight. For a travel trailer that should be 10-15% of the trailer weight. 13% is a good number to use soooo let's look at that 30' trailer. Loaded up you will have a tongue weight approaching or even exceeding 1,000 lbs. Remember that advertised "empty weight?" They advertise the tongue weight using that same mythical "empty weight". Now take that tongue weight and add another 100-120 lbs for a decent weight distributing hitch with sway bars..

Truck numbers. First is the everpresent overused, misunderstood "max towing". It doesn't mean a thing when towing a travel trailer! That number is derived by PULLING a flat trailer (low center of gravity, little wind resistance) with the majority of the load balanced on the trailer axle with very little tongue weight. TOWING is a PULL number. You need to HAUL a travel trailer, that's a CARRYING number. Think of towing this way, take a 4 wheeled garden cart and load it with 200 lbs. With no weight on the handle you can pull it relatively easily. Now take that same weight and placebit in a wheelbarrow. Now you have support a ratio of that weight and move it, that's hauling.

The most important number relative to hauling around a camper is MAX LOAD CAPACITY. That number for YOUR vehicle can be found on YOUR drivers door pillar. Numbers on the internet do not pertain to YOUR vehichle. They are max advertising numbers for a vehicle that's not like yours, read the fine print. YOUR numbers on that door pillar sticker will be found with this sentence "The combined weights of all occupants and cargo should never exceed xxxxlbs." That is your Max load capacity. That weight, like the trailer shipping weight, is empty from the factory. Anything add to, or placed in the vehichle is subtracted from that number. So, if the dealer or you add floor mats, cargo liner, car seats, passengers, toys or diaper bag, a cooler with lunch and drinks, a tool box, tools, the stuff in the glove box and storage pockets, EVERYTHING you put in reduces the payload hy that weight.

SUV's have limited payload because they are built on the same frame as the same pickup truck (typically 1/2 ton truck). The payload is reduced as the SUV has more roof area, more glass, more carpeting, etc. A typical SUV will have a payload around 1,400 to 1,000 lbs depending on options. Again, the door sticker is the only way to tell.

Start with that load capacity. Now subtract from that the following weights, trailer tongue, hitch & sway bars, passengers, pets, and everything else not supplied by the factory. Chances are you will quickly exceed the SUVs payload capacity.

There are other limiting weights that should not be exceeded. Front and rear axle weights, gross vehicle weight, and gross combined vehicle weights (I.e. that vehicle + the trailer). Typically you'll exceed the payload number first. NOTE - ANY of these numbers should not be exceeded individually so exceed ONE of them and it's game over.

So now we've discussed weights and look how long this is. So I won't go into how hauling a 11 1/2' tall by 30' long sail behind an SUV will react to side winds or a passing truck or his. Or how the trailer will affect the short wheelbase SUV if you have to change lanes in an emergency maneuver, or handle a blowout,nor if you drop a trailer tire off the pavement onto a low shoulder.

In summarizing here's my advice.... If the SUV is necessary you realistically need to look at a smaller trailer. Read the posts on this forum regarding this. It has been discussed ad nauseum. If you read these past posts you'll quickly see the folks that get defensive, want to argue, or rationalize by stating how they will "travel light" and "only go 150 miles away". Those statements aren't rational or logical. Weight in campers is cumulative as folks tend to bring more stuff over time and never remove stuff. The "only go a short distance" is not relevant as the laws of physics 1 block away are the same 1,000 miles away.

I know this was lengthy but I hope you find it useful. Stay safe and enjoy your soon to come adventures.

Roper46
12-19-2020, 06:31 AM
I second Marshall's advise. Even though most people disagree, the numbers he stated are correct.

If you will look at my very first post in the New Members forum, pulling my new TT home from the dealer scared me to death. I have experience pulling trailers including a fully loaded three horse slant trailer with a slide in Lance camper on the tow vehicle. But nothing compared to pulling my new Cougar home with a half ton GMC.

I thought and was told by Camping World that the 2020 GMC half ton AT4 would have no problem with the TT, wrong. Sales people just looking for a sale. After I slowly made it home safely, I tried to find a 3/4 ton GMC but there was & probably still is a shortage. I drove nothing but GMCs for over 15 years & still miss them. But I am very happy w the towing capability of my Ram.

Everyone new to towing these TTs should look at all the experiences like mine on these forums for your safety and that of your loved ones.

LewisB
12-19-2020, 07:30 AM
Back in the day, we bought a 24 foot bunkhouse pull trailer thinking our K5 blazer would be perfect. NO NO NO Short wheelbase, almost no payload (I didn't even know about payload back then), horrible experience. DW, 2 kids, & I pulled onto I10 one morning and were going about 60 when an 18 wheeler went by going about 90. Ever see those "trailer swaying" videos on YouTube? That was us - we were 1 final sway away from a roll over with the trailer tires screeching sideways down the free way at 60. Fortunately (praise to God) we didn't roll - but a week later I traded that K5 blazer for a long wheelbase F250 and have never looked back.

Pulling a 30 foot trailer with any SUV loaded with passengers just will not work payload wise, and you won't be much better with the 1/2 ton pickup from a stability standpoint. Save yourself from the "sideways on the freeway" bit; if you want to camp with a 30 foot trailer, buy a capable long wheelbase truck. A 3/4 ton is a much better choice, will still haul your passengers and gear, is more likely to accommodate that bigger trailer the DW will want next year, and it won't be much different in initial or operational cost and it just might save the life of you and/or your family.

Just my opinion, but based on real-life experiences.

jasin1
12-19-2020, 08:06 AM
Back in the day, we bought a 24 foot bunkhouse pull trailer thinking our K5 blazer would be perfect. NO NO NO Short wheelbase, almost no payload (I didn't even know about payload back then), horrible experience. DW, 2 kids, & I pulled onto I10 one morning and were going about 60 when an 18 wheeler went by going about 90. Ever see those "trailer swaying" videos on YouTube? That was us - we were 1 final sway away from a roll over with the trailer tires screeching sideways down the free way at 60. Fortunately (praise to God) we didn't roll - but a week later I traded that K5 blazer for a long wheelbase F250 and have never looked back.

Pulling a 30 foot trailer with any SUV loaded with passengers just will not work payload wise, and you won't be much better with the 1/2 ton pickup from a stability standpoint. Save yourself from the "sideways on the freeway" bit; if you want to camp with a 30 foot trailer, buy a capable long wheelbase truck. A 3/4 ton is a much better choice, will still haul your passengers and gear, is more likely to accommodate that bigger trailer the DW will want next year, and it won't be much different in initial or operational cost and it just might save the life of you and/or your family.

Just my opinion, but based on real-life experiences.

My neighbor was telling me why he switched to a fifth wheel some years ago. I didnít know just thought he was upgrading. He had a 90s ram charger I believe and he was getting on to 695 in md and he said out of nowhere the trailer started swaying and made two large swings and then came all the way around and flipped over. He said he knew what to do but it happened so fast he kinda froze. He wasnít speeding, just the right combination of a million different factors happening at once. Luckily he said it broke loose of the tow vehicle and didnít hit anyone or flip his truck over. He was pointing the wrong way on 695 after it was over. He got a long bed 3/4 ton ram diesel and decided to go with a fifth wheel as well. Insurance totaled the rv and the truck. It was more the limitation of the short wheelbase he thought then anything else

SummitPond
12-19-2020, 02:01 PM
I saw the comments on the issues of towing with a Chevy Tahoe i.e. "The tail wagging the dog." I'm considering the purchase of a Keystone Cougar 26RBS which is 29' 11" and 6604 lbs. dry weight. I don't have a tow vehicle yet and need don't want a truck since I need the functionality and seating capacity of an SUV when not towing. The Tahoe can tow 8,400 lbs. The longer Suburban can tow 8,100 lbs, but doesn't fit in my garage. The Ford Expedition is longer than the Tahoe and shorter than the Suburban and can tow 9,300 lbs. The RV salesmen only talk about weight, not length and say that the loaded RV should be 1,000 lbs under the towing capacity of the vehicle.
I'd appreciate any comments on potential issues I might be facing with any of these 3 vehicles. Thanks!

<clip>
It was more the limitation of the short wheelbase he thought then anything else

Grantmc1

John (JRTJH) gave a rule of thumb on another post relating wheelbase to trailer length. I summarize:

110" TV wheelbase is good up to a 20' TT length.

For every additional 1' of TT length add 4" to the TV wheelbase.

In a subsequent post he mentioned (my wording -->) that this rule of thumb may be a little conservative due to new traction control and other features not available on older vehicles.

Just something else to keep in mind when looking for a TT to fit a TV.

Good luck, and welcome to the forum.

Grantmc1
12-19-2020, 06:49 PM
Thanks so much for your detailed answer. My plan was to trade in my Pacifica for a Tahoe or a Expedition with the max tow package. Since we don’t want a smaller TT it now it looks like I’ll need to look for a used F250 or 2500 instead. I guess I’ll keep my Pacifica.
To get out of towing altogether I’m also considering a very small Class A (25.5 feet) new - or a used Class B+. Not sure I can justify the cost. Anyway I appreciate you sharing your knowledge and experience.

Grantmc1
12-19-2020, 07:00 PM
Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge and experience. Looks like I’ll be looking for an F250 or 2500 instead!

77cruiser
12-20-2020, 05:09 AM
If you buy a small MH don't get one with a corner bed, been there.

markcee
12-20-2020, 05:52 AM
Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge and experience. Looks like Iíll be looking for an F250 or 2500 instead!

Heck....spend a few hundred more bucks and go with an F350 or 3500. A lot more payload and pretty much same ride quality. This will cover you should you want to upgrade trailers in a year or two.

This would be particularly important if you are considering a diesel. Due to the weight of the diesel engine, you could have about 800 lbs. less payload than on a gas model truck. Where you might have 3500 lbs of sticker payload capacity on a 1-ton diesel, the 3/4 would be in the 2700 lb range.

Excess truck and payload capacity is never a bad thing!

Grantmc1
12-20-2020, 06:42 AM
Heck....spend a few hundred more bucks and go with an F350 or 3500. A lot more payload and pretty much same ride quality. This will cover you should you want to upgrade trailers in a year or two.

This would be particularly important if you are considering a diesel. Due to the weight of the diesel engine, you could have about 800 lbs. less payload than on a gas model truck. Where you might have 3500 lbs of sticker payload capacity on a 1-ton diesel, the 3/4 would be in the 2700 lb range.

Excess truck and payload capacity is never a bad thing!
Thanks again.
Now that I am going to be looking at a truck it opens the door for me to look at the Cougar half ton fifth wheel series. I saw one I like that’s 28 ft 10 inches long and 7582 pounds dry weight. I don’t have much knowledge or experience with these but I hear that they are easier to tow. Since they call it a Half ton series I assume you could tow it with a half ton truck with the proper tow package. Would the same tow caveats apply with the fifth wheel as the regular travel trailer? I know that the tongue weight is a lot heavier with the fifth wheel.

markcee
12-20-2020, 07:00 AM
Thanks again.
Now that I am going to be looking at a truck it opens the door for me to look at the Cougar half ton fifth wheel series. I saw one I like that’s 28 ft 10 inches long and 7582 pounds dry weight. I don’t have much knowledge or experience with these but I hear that they are easier to tow. Since they call it a Half ton series I assume you could tow it with a half ton truck with the proper tow package. Would the same tow caveats apply with the fifth wheel as the regular travel trailer? I know that the tongue weight is a lot heavier with the fifth wheel.

Note my signature includes a '1/2 ton' series Cougar, also note my signature includes a 1-ton truck....lol.

That 1/2 ton business is a marketing ploy that I fell for. I didn't do my homework, listened to the truck and RV salesmen and bought a 1/2 ton 'max tow' F150. Learning about towing after the fact, I realized I was at the very limits of payload and axle ratings...without carrying much of anything in the bed of the truck. Ford does make a 'heavy duty payload package' (HDPP) 1/2 ton that would likely do the job within ratings, but you would be hard pressed to find one in dealer stock.

In addition to being at the various weight limits, the standard issue 1/2 ton truck (even the max tow models) will not offer the same stability in towing a large 'sail' like a TT or 5th wheel that a 3/4 or 1-ton does.

You have a blank slate. I highly recommend purchasing more truck than you need for whatever 5th wheel or travel trailer you choose.

General rules of thumb for tongue weight is to figure 13% of travel trailer's GVWR and 20% of a 5th wheels GVWR for pin weight. This will come right off the top of your specific truck's payload rating. Whatever is left over is what you have for everything else in the truck, plus all passengers.

LewisB
12-20-2020, 07:06 AM
Thanks again.
Now that I am going to be looking at a truck it opens the door for me to look at the Cougar half ton fifth wheel series. I saw one I like thatís 28 ft 10 inches long and 7582 pounds dry weight. I donít have much knowledge or experience with these but I hear that they are easier to tow. Since they call it a Half ton series I assume you could tow it with a half ton truck with the proper tow package. Would the same tow caveats apply with the fifth wheel as the regular travel trailer? I know that the tongue weight is a lot heavier with the fifth wheel.

Some will disagree, but the concept of a "1/2 ton towable 5th wheel" is mostly marketing hype by the manufacturers. You will be faced with the same issues attempting to find a setup as you would with the SUV and a pull trailer.

Go back to Marshall's (flybouy) post and substitute "5th wheel pin weight" for "hitch weight". Use about 20% of the trailer's GVWR for the estimated pin weight and you arrive at the same crossroads. Most 1/2 ton trucks (especially the fancy ones) simply will not have adequate payload to deal with even the smaller 5th wheel trailers.

Unfortunately, there just is no free lunch on this issue. If you want to SAFELY pull a 10K 30 foot house on wheels down the highway at 60 mph, you are going to need a true truck. Hope that helps in your decision.

BTW, you are doing the right thing! Asking questions and listening to the answers. That is rare and refreshing on this forum. THANKS! :applause:

sourdough
12-20-2020, 08:49 AM
Yes, you are doing the right thing doing your research up front. And as Mark said you have a clean slate so don't box yourself in right off the bat and have regrets.

A 1/2 ton is not capable of towing a 5th wheel, "1/2 ton model or not". Not even the HDPP Fords. I've never seen one that I know of but I have read about them - rare as hen's teeth. Even then, the minute you strap that 5th wheel (1/2 ton towable) on it you are maxed out on payload and gawrs. That is not a good place to be - btdt.

Since you are looking at a new truck AND a 5th wheel you owe it to yourself to just look at a 1 ton. Now several years back you would have had to place me on a stake with a fire under me to get me to say that....but, now, I can honestly tell you that it is the way to go. If you choose wisely you will have a nice safety margin in weights and a nice 5th wheel. The control is markedly better as well with a HD truck. Keep in mind that a 1 ton has limits as well and will not tow a large 5th wheel - that will require a dually. Also, as has been mentioned, always keep in mind the weight difference between a gas and diesel engine and what that exacts from the available payload.

flybouy
12-20-2020, 10:06 AM
Thanks so much for your detailed answer. My plan was to trade in my Pacifica for a Tahoe or a Expedition with the max tow package. Since we donít want a smaller TT it now it looks like Iíll need to look for a used F250 or 2500 instead. I guess Iíll keep my Pacifica.
To get out of towing altogether Iím also considering a very small Class A (25.5 feet) new - or a used Class B+. Not sure I can justify the cost. Anyway I appreciate you sharing your knowledge and experience.

DW and I looked at a lot of class C & B motor homes before buying our current trailer. First off let me state that we were looking before I retired so the thought of a drive train setting for 4 to 6 months Ata time was not appealing. Inactive long periods can result in seals drying out causing leaks, valves in transmissions sticking, etc.

That being said, here are my observations on drivable vs towable:

Drivable - no more towing, hitching/unhitching.
Reality - either break down camp or tow a car to leave campsite

Drivable - eat and use toilet while driving
Reality - not on the pot hole roads with folks cutting you off (AR braking)

Drivable - gas: Very poor fuel mileage, transmission typically more problematic. Struggle with hills or passing. Diesel - better reliability but increase up front cost and faster depreciation because it's in an RV not a PU.

Drivable - less space that towable of the same length. Less interior space due to driver seat area and hood vs the box of a trailer. Exterior storage is limited as space from cab forward is unavailable. Typically slide outs are much smaller, limited sleeping capacity.

Towable - we had a truck, disconnect and go explore no problem. If there's an issue with the trailer, say broken spring or some major failure my ride is independent so if trailer is tied up waiting on parts or device I don't have to rent a tide.

Towable - plenty of storage, plenty of sleeping capacity without someone lying on a "jack knife" bed. I think they call them that because after one night you'll fell like someone stuck you in the back with a knife.

Towable - you have to stop to use the fridge or toilet. Not a big deal to me. After a few hours the dog and I need to stretch and there's a second door to bathroom so no need to run slide out for access.

Towable - outdoor kitchen. We only cook inside if it's raining hard. Outdoor fridge prevents constantly going in and out of camper, also no more lugging ice chests outside. Smaller drivables don't offer them.

So these were my thought. Like everything in this world what suits me may not suit you. My advice, don't be caught up in the "bling" or sales talk. Look at it from how you would use it every day. YMMV

Bill-2020
12-20-2020, 12:34 PM
During the recent search for my brothers truck, one dealer tried to push the heavy duty version of the F150 on him, this after he balked at the dealers comments that you canít find a F250 for under $60K. Dealer figured theyíd get him interested in a ďnear F250Ē 150 for that ďunder $60KĒ comment. You never saw two people walk out so fast.

jasin1
12-20-2020, 01:53 PM
Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge and experience. Looks like Iíll be looking for an F250 or 2500 instead!

I know it must seem complicated at times with truck and trailer combos but you are in a perfect situation with many options..the best scenario of all of them is having MORE truck then you need. Itís usually not a big monetary difference between 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. Whatever you choose make sure it does not have the factory gvwr downgrade. It will be right on the sticker ..Ford for instance has a lot of 1 ton trucks at just 10000 lb downgrade. I would still have been over my weight with my combination..normal gvwr is over 12000 I believe with Ford 8í srw and 11500 for shortbed. And if you buy a used 3/4 ton then you could really be in a bind. My 2012 ram 2500 only had a little over 2100lb payload and 9600 gvwr ( when you weigh your truck with fifth wheel attached. Your truck canít weigh over the listed gvwr.that included you,wife,kids everything in the truck and pin weight of fifth wheel) I was over by almost 1000 lbs thatís why I just bought a new truck
If you absolutely want a 3/4 ton then stick with stripped down diesel or loaded up gas model.....Chevy/gmc actually has a 3/4 ton diesel loaded model with 11300gvwr and over 3000 lb payload. Itís a rare model and the other truck makers may follow. For gods sake dont buy the minimal truck for your requirements or you will be back here in a couple of years and trying to make it work with your new fifth wheel lol

notanlines
12-20-2020, 02:59 PM
My advice is to, at a bare minimum, stick with someone's 1 ton F350/3500 SRW. You won't be sorry.
Only because you seem like a nice, family oriented guy are we not trying to talk you into a custom T210 Kenworth Hauler. (It would, after all, make you king of the block!):D

Grantmc1
12-20-2020, 05:48 PM
Thanks to everyone for your replies. Iím not only getting a good education on trailers, towing, and trucks but I believe you all saved me from making a huge financial mistake that likely would have endangered my family. While I still wish it were true that an SUV thatís rated to tow over 9000 pounds could tow a 7,000 pound TT in real world conditions; wishing it were so doesnít make it so.

jasin1
12-20-2020, 05:53 PM
Thanks to everyone for your replies. Iím not only getting a good education on trailers, towing, and trucks but I believe you all saved me from making a huge financial mistake that likely would have endangered my family. While I still wish it were true that an SUV thatís rated to tow over 9000 pounds could tow a 7,000 pound TT in real world conditions; wishing it were so doesnít make it so.

Your welcome!..One more bit of advice. When you get your camper wait a little bit before you load up on everything you THINK you will need lol I spent a lot on a generator and solar and inverters without consulting anyone.... should have bounced a few of those ideas off this forum before pulling the trigger on those purchases

Badbart56
12-20-2020, 06:03 PM
My advice is to, at a bare minimum, stick with someone's 1 ton F350/3500 SRW. You won't be sorry.
Only because you seem like a nice, family oriented guy are we not trying to talk you into a custom T210 Kenworth Hauler. (It would, after all, make you king of the block!):D

What he said! Both models drive the same and cost difference is negligible. But payload is much better.

Grantmc1
12-20-2020, 07:54 PM
Thanks for the comparison of motorhome versus travel trailer. Good info to think about. You definitely get a lot more space for the money with a TT. We had friends who bought a class B+ who after the first year of traveling in it bought a Honda Fit to tow behind it. Having to tow another vehicle behind your motor home seems to defeat the purpose.

flybouy
12-21-2020, 03:57 AM
Thanks for the comparison of motorhome versus travel trailer. Good info to think about. You definitely get a lot more space for the money with a TT. We had friends who bought a class B+ who after the first year of traveling in it bought a Honda Fit to tow behind it. Having to tow another vehicle behind your motor home seems to defeat the purpose.

It depends on your purpose. When we were looking at them I was working so we primarily camped within a 150 mile radius and didn't leave the cg very often. Everyone's wants and needs are different. It's what works for you. Enjoy!

gearhead
12-21-2020, 05:14 AM
Forget all those issues with motorhomes. What the REAL issue is: all those pots and pans rattling going down the road will drive you crazy.
"If I were you" I'd be looking at a 1ton single rear wheel, maybe a short bed if that's what's needed to fit your garage.

sourdough
12-21-2020, 05:17 AM
Although the OP inquired about pulling a TT with a Tahoe I thought I'd make this comment about a MH since we've migrated in that direction.

A guy pulled into the campground on Friday parked across from us. Set up and spent the night after getting all hooked up. The next day and Sunday, both days, he unhooked everything, fired that big thing up and disappeared for most of the day returning in the afternoon. Reconnected everything and did whatever he was doing at the campsite - no toad. That is a no go for me from the gitgo. We like to go and do everywhere we go and to do so in a large Class A just seems like nonsense to me. I know others will feel differently but that's JMO - YMMV.

wiredgeorge
12-21-2020, 05:55 AM
By the way, Grantmc1 (from New Braunfels) we are near each other. I would like to point out that asking folks on a site where there are only fifth wheels and bumper pulls to talk about the merits of a Class A/B/C may not have a ton of balance. To my thinking, you would have to drag a toad because if the family wants a Big Mac, the Class A/B/C will not be very convenient nor will it fit under the drive through in some cases. Lots of folks have motor coaches and if I were doing motor coach it certainly wouldn't be in a Class B as they have minimal room and has been pointed out large Class A motorhomes with gas engines are dogs and suck gas (much like a one ton truck). We live in the NE corner of Medina County near Medina Lake by the way.

Javi
12-21-2020, 06:44 AM
Although the OP inquired about pulling a TT with a Tahoe I thought I'd make this comment about a MH since we've migrated in that direction.

A guy pulled into the campground on Friday parked across from us. Set up and spent the night after getting all hooked up. The next day and Sunday, both days, he unhooked everything, fired that big thing up and disappeared for most of the day returning in the afternoon. Reconnected everything and did whatever he was doing at the campsite - no toad. That is a no go for me from the gitgo. We like to go and do everywhere we go and to do so in a large Class A just seems like nonsense to me. I know others will feel differently but that's JMO - YMMV.

Always said that if I go to a Class A that I'll buy a old CJ-5 rag top to pull behind it.. easy to tow and fun to drive around.

travelin texans
12-21-2020, 08:57 AM
When we were about to retire we contemplated all forms of travel from motorhomes to TTs, but due the fact that we already had 5th wheel & dually we'd try the fulltiming in it 1st, we traded for a bigger 5 the wheel the 2nd month out as we needed more room.
As George said a Class B would never work, you have to go outside to change your mind let alone try to change clothes. Also had friends that had a 30-32' Class C with the full wall slide that if one of them stood up the other better sit as there was no room to pass.
Before we traded up 5th wheels we looked at Class As only to decide that what we wanted/thought we needed was WAY too much money. Not to mention still would absolutely need a toad. As I told one fellow in a Class A pulling his SUV that "at least with my setup I can back up about anywhere" to which he responded "so can I.............for about a foot!".
We all have make our own decisions on what works best for us!.

gearhead
12-21-2020, 02:15 PM
Always said that if I go to a Class A that I'll buy a old CJ-5 rag top to pull behind it.. easy to tow and fun to drive around.

When we bought a class c in 1986? that's what we ended up with. Nothing like getting all settled in and the wife needs some baby food. That was before automatic levelers (I guess) so it took a while to get all settled in again. I bought an old 1973? CJ5 from the wife's school principal. It had been burned and had a new fiberglass body on it. Very light weight. I pulled it with a $40 JC Whitney tow bar. We were somewhere in maybe South Dakota and about to run out of gas. I saw a tall billboard with a great gas price. Pulled in the parking lot and it had knee high weeds, closed. Only way out, I had to back the jeep into ditch while I was sideways on a farm road. I'm thinking all I need is a rancher going 80mph to come over that hill, t-bone us and kill everybody. I switched out the OEM 35 gallon gas tank for a aftermarket 55 gallon. Ford 460 could get 8mpg downhill out of Pagosa Springs.
But I still think about a MH.

77cruiser
12-21-2020, 02:51 PM
Sometimes I miss the B+ we had for a year, like when you have to go, just pull over, of if you want to have coffee & a bite pull over start the gen.
Didn't like the corner bed of the rattling of dishes going down the road. Mileage wasn't bad about 10.5 had a 6.0 LS. If it was a diesel & had better sleeping might have still had it.

wiredgeorge
12-21-2020, 04:18 PM
Drove a Jeep for two weeks when out at the railhead attached to Barstow Air Station. Was there on a 2 week summer camp (it was winter) when attached to the 86th Truck Company and we were there to unload trains carrying mechanized units; jeeps, duece & 1/2s, etc. Since i was the SENIOR LIGHT TRUCK driver (I drove the fuel truck) and had never driven a Jeep, the company commander (a dumb young ROTC 2nd LT) made me his driver; lasted one day. First corner went in hot and two wheels lifted in the corner. LT got his own jeep and I put my clubs in the back and headed over to the golf course on the Air Base. That railhead was kind of spooky as they bussed in a bunch of workers every day who remanufactured Viet Nam era mechanized hardware, smeared it with cosmolene and lined all that stuff up in straight rows. Guess they gave it away or sold it to 3rd world allies? Dunno but I never had the urge to drive a jeep after that.

jasin1
12-21-2020, 04:29 PM
Drove a Jeep for two weeks when out at the railhead attached to Barstow Air Station. Was there on a 2 week summer camp (it was winter) when attached to the 86th Truck Company and we were there to unload trains carrying mechanized units; jeeps, duece & 1/2s, etc. Since i was the SENIOR LIGHT TRUCK driver (I drove the fuel truck) and had never driven a Jeep, the company commander (a dumb young ROTC 2nd LT) made me his driver; lasted one day. First corner went in hot and two wheels lifted in the corner. LT got his own jeep and I put my clubs in the back and headed over to the golf course on the Air Base. That railhead was kind of spooky as they bussed in a bunch of workers every day who remanufactured Viet Nam era mechanized hardware, smeared it with cosmolene and lined all that stuff up in straight rows. Guess they gave it away or sold it to 3rd world allies? Dunno but I never had the urge to drive a jeep after that.

I wish my Jeep was covered in cosmolene! I have an old 97 tj that I spend more time welding together as rusted parts shed off of it. Frame looks like an erector set . Itís my beater for summertime around the neighborhood

sourdough
12-21-2020, 06:09 PM
Since we've drifted to Jeeps...for a second :); always thought the CJs were neat looking but impractical. Bought larger 4x4 type units. DD and husband asked me if I could find them a CJ somewhere (they were in Dallas).

Long story short; bought one for them that needed work and that was OK with SIL...not really. Gave it back to me and being me, rebuilt it from stern to stern replacing everything but some of the metalwork. My experience prior to that with a smaller 4x4 was a friends Suzuki Samurai- what a.....terror. Small lift on the Jeep (CJ7) new everything underneath, new engine, top, interior etc. I LOVED that thing. Folks don't understand, and neither did I, the inherent abilities of a CJ7. Took folks all over the place with all kinds of vehicles and the CJ just kept chugging and outperforming. Tight turns/spots (Black Bear Pass) no problem. Yep, I'd take one with me....and another vehicle I just gave away (she had served me well).

Javi
12-22-2020, 06:09 AM
Since we've drifted to Jeeps...for a second :); always thought the CJs were neat looking but impractical. Bought larger 4x4 type units. DD and husband asked me if I could find them a CJ somewhere (they were in Dallas).

Long story short; bought one for them that needed work and that was OK with SIL...not really. Gave it back to me and being me, rebuilt it from stern to stern replacing everything but some of the metalwork. My experience prior to that with a smaller 4x4 was a friends Suzuki Samurai- what a.....terror. Small lift on the Jeep (CJ7) new everything underneath, new engine, top, interior etc. I LOVED that thing. Folks don't understand, and neither did I, the inherent abilities of a CJ7. Took folks all over the place with all kinds of vehicles and the CJ just kept chugging and outperforming. Tight turns/spots (Black Bear Pass) no problem. Yep, I'd take one with me....and another vehicle I just gave away (she had served me well).
When we moved to Denver in '74 I owned a 4x4 Blazer didn't take long to realize that while a lot of fun down here it wasn't really suited to Colorado so I sold it and bought an old International 3/4 ton Travelall, now that thing was heavy.. but it went everywhere it would fit.. :D

We came home for Christmas in '76 and I bought a brand spanking new 1977 Jeep Renegade CJ-5... man was that thing fun.. and it opened up many more places for the three of us to explore.

We drove that CJ-5 as our only car for the rest of the time we lived in Colorado and even after we moved back to Texas it was our go to transportation until April 27, 1983 when I collided with a 77 Chrysler Imperial head on at over 70 mph...

That was the end of that CJ-5 and I ordered an '84 Ford F250 diesel from my hospital bed...

jasin1
12-22-2020, 06:26 AM
When we moved to Denver in '74 I owned a 4x4 Blazer didn't take long to realize that while a lot of fun down here it wasn't really suited to Colorado so I sold it and bought an old International 3/4 ton Travelall, now that thing was heavy.. but it went everywhere it would fit.. :D

We came home for Christmas in '76 and I bought a brand spanking new 1977 Jeep Renegade CJ-5... man was that thing fun.. and it opened up many more places for the three of us to explore.

We drove that CJ-5 as our only car for the rest of the time we lived in Colorado and even after we moved back to Texas it was our go to transportation until April 27, 1983 when I collided with a 77 Chrysler Imperial head on at over 70 mph...

That was the end of that CJ-5 and I ordered an '84 Ford F250 diesel from my hospital bed...

I never thought I would be a jeep guy. I prefer ac when Iím driving. But I have to say itís something enjoyable about driving around with no doors or roof on a cool summer night. Itís like a golf cart. I tend to drive at a more leisurely pace with no worries. I originally bought for my Son but I kept it when he moved on to ram diesels. I may have to make a trip to Texas to find a rust free frame. Up here in the northeast when itís quiet you can hear the rust eating away at it. Now if I could only figure out a way of taking the fifth wheel to Texas and hooking up a tag trailer to bring the frame back

travelin texans
12-22-2020, 08:29 AM
I never thought I would be a jeep guy. I prefer ac when Iím driving. But I have to say itís something enjoyable about driving around with no doors or roof on a cool summer night. Itís like a golf cart. I tend to drive at a more leisurely pace with no worries. I originally bought for my Son but I kept it when he moved on to ram diesels. I may have to make a trip to Texas to find a rust free frame. Up here in the northeast when itís quiet you can hear the rust eating away at it. Now if I could only figure out a way of taking the fifth wheel to Texas and hooking up a tag trailer to bring the frame back

Same here, always been a GM guy (especially after driving Ford's at work for 30+ years, 'nuff said about that), the day we sold the 5th wheel the DW said "let's go, we're getting rid of that fat *** truck", we'd had a dually for 15+ years as a daily driver, I said "what are we looking for?", she said "something fun, go to a Jeep dealer", couple hours later we drove home in a new 4 door Wrangler Sahara & I will say now after 37k miles I'm impressed with everything about it.

jasin1
12-22-2020, 11:39 AM
Same here, always been a GM guy (especially after driving Ford's at work for 30+ years, 'nuff said about that), the day we sold the 5th wheel the DW said "let's go, we're getting rid of that fat *** truck", we'd had a dually for 15+ years as a daily driver, I said "what are we looking for?", she said "something fun, go to a Jeep dealer", couple hours later we drove home in a new 4 door Wrangler Sahara & I will say now after 37k miles I'm impressed with everything about it.

The newer models addressed some of the rust issues. Sahara is a nice model. Good choice

LewisB
12-22-2020, 12:08 PM
I can certainly connect with all the jeep comments. Our Can Am XRC is quite similar to a CJ experience but a bit more capable and a whole lot more exciting. You can load it in a toy hauler and haul it across country. And it is street legal on any road in Arizona. We love getting out in ours!

jasin1
12-22-2020, 05:26 PM
I can certainly connect with all the jeep comments. Our Can Am XRC is quite similar to a CJ experience but a bit more capable and a whole lot more exciting. You can load it in a toy hauler and haul it across country. And it is street legal on any road in Arizona. We love getting out in ours!

That looks nice!