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Old 09-20-2018, 08:11 AM   #11
bbells
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I am sure someone has already said this, but marine batteries are not deep cycle. They are simply a compromise between a car battery, deep cycle, and weight. Even in the best use their life span is only 6 months to 1.5 years. 12v real deep cycle batteries weigh about 150 pounds and last 10 times longer (both lifespan and power) than marine batteries. Pick up a couple 6v golf cart batteries and put them in series if you are going to replace your current battery. They cost the same, last longer and have 2-4 times the amp hours. Avoid anything that has cca on it. FYI: I have set up solar systems for campers and cabins and ham shacks for over 20 years. Don't waste your money on marine batteries.
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:54 AM   #12
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Thanks, BBells. Good knowledge! As newbies, we didn't know about our existing batteries. We're wondering if the rig originally shipped with these batteries.

We're entertaining one battery option and an alternative to conventional solar panels, and can further use your knowledge and expertise ....

Weight is a definite concern for our rig. So, we're considering installing MiaSolé flex panels as a permanent solar solution. Their panels boast 16.5% efficiency, are unbreakable, and weigh far less than conventional panels. We've taken all the necessary measurements and can possibly get at least 1200w on the roof, but only if we remove the "bat" antenna. We don't watch TV, so we're not going to miss it a bit. Are you familiar with the flex solar "peel and stick" panels?

As for batteries, our first option is to purchase Clean Energy Storage's PowerGrid box that includes either a 24 or 48v 7.6kwh 330ah LiFeMnPO4 battery that has a 7-minute DOD charge to 90% capacity. The plug and play box also includes a 6K inverter, a smart charger, and mounted interconnects.

All pretty cool.


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Originally Posted by bbells View Post
I am sure someone has already said this, but marine batteries are not deep cycle. They are simply a compromise between a car battery, deep cycle, and weight. Even in the best use their life span is only 6 months to 1.5 years. 12v real deep cycle batteries weigh about 150 pounds and last 10 times longer (both lifespan and power) than marine batteries. Pick up a couple 6v golf cart batteries and put them in series if you are going to replace your current battery. They cost the same, last longer and have 2-4 times the amp hours. Avoid anything that has cca on it. FYI: I have set up solar systems for campers and cabins and ham shacks for over 20 years. Don't waste your money on marine batteries.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:24 AM   #13
JRTJH
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Originally Posted by BRB Rig View Post
Thanks, BBells. Good knowledge! As newbies, we didn't know about our existing batteries. We're wondering if the rig originally shipped with these batteries. :
FYI: Keystone does not "ship batteries with any trailer". ALL batteries are provided by the dealership as a part of the sale to the customer. At some dealerships you'll get the smallest available (cheapest) marine battery, at some dealerships you'll get "any old battery that came in with a trade last week" and at some dealerships you'll get a "reasonably sized quality RV battery"..... That said, what dealer A provides to his customers may be entirely different than you'll find at dealer B across the street. There is no consistency in battery provisions and no involvement with the factory.

Your owner's manual has this statement on page 28 in the "breakaway switch instructions"

"The RV battery is not supplied by Keystone. Please consult your RV dealer to purchase the proper battery."
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:19 PM   #14
rinaldij
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FWIW I have a 100 watt solar panel set I use to maintain the battery while in storage.
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Old 09-20-2018, 01:44 PM   #15
BadmanRick
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We keep our TT at home hooked up to a 30 amp Service. This keeps our battery charged. See if the storage facility has a 110 hookup to plug into. As long as you are not using the AC units 110 will keep the batteries charged.
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Old 09-21-2018, 08:57 AM   #16
bbells
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Originally Posted by BRB Rig View Post
Thanks, BBells. Good knowledge! As newbies, we didn't know about our existing batteries. We're wondering if the rig originally shipped with these batteries.

We're entertaining one battery option and an alternative to conventional solar panels, and can further use your knowledge and expertise ....

Weight is a definite concern for our rig. So, we're considering installing MiaSolé flex panels as a permanent solar solution. Their panels boast 16.5% efficiency, are unbreakable, and weigh far less than conventional panels. We've taken all the necessary measurements and can possibly get at least 1200w on the roof, but only if we remove the "bat" antenna. We don't watch TV, so we're not going to miss it a bit. Are you familiar with the flex solar "peel and stick" panels?

As for batteries, our first option is to purchase Clean Energy Storage's PowerGrid box that includes either a 24 or 48v 7.6kwh 330ah LiFeMnPO4 battery that has a 7-minute DOD charge to 90% capacity. The plug and play box also includes a 6K inverter, a smart charger, and mounted interconnects.

All pretty cool.
Just a couple things. 7600w/1200w = 6 hours of direct sun needed to charge. Since you will only be discharging at most 50%, you should be able to completely charge your panels every day, unless you park under a tree. You could probably get away with skipping one panel and leave the antenna. I agree with the 24-48v battery packs. It is the only way to get efficiency. Some people are forced to use 12v systems since their RV charger is 12v and they want to be able too use both. Most get 24v panels to charge the 12v battery pack - With the right controller. Not real efficient, but they are less expensive per watt. I stopped my biz when the tariffs hit on the panels. It just about doubled the price for most panels - Making them unrealistic for most people since it is impossible to find USA made panels that are affordable and have any quality. Therefore no real experience with the flex panels. When they first came out I had a couple questions about them that I never answered. 1) Can they handle hail hitting them straight on? Most panels are at an angle and get glancing blows. 2) When you have a wiring problem or breakdown on one, can you easily remove it? 3) If they are tightly glued on the entire back, what happens when temperatures flex the roof and panels differently? On the other hand, how much of that can happen in the 3-5 year avg ownership of an RV? Sorry I can't be more help.
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Old 09-21-2018, 04:27 PM   #17
tomd
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I have been gathering data using my new 'battery monitoring system' which has greatly improved the 'lack of data' I had, which caused batteries to drain previously.
My discharge runs about .15 A with battery switch OFF. If on, almost 1.8 Amps. I carry 2 80Ah batteries=160Ah total; So 2 amps reaches 50% discharge in about 80 hrs. with the switch ON.

Before investing in new power grid, I strongly suggest you monitor some typical trips and figure out you're needed usage. My history shows I can easily support 2 camping days with no charge, even with heater on at night(fan draws power). But whatever you do, be sure to size panels, batteries as a combined system so the complement each other.
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Old 09-30-2018, 07:40 AM   #18
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If I know my camper isn't going to be used for more than a couple weeks I pull them and bring to my garage and leave them hooked up to a trickle charger until the next time I need them.
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