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Old 07-11-2018, 01:42 PM   #21
notanlines
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Originally Posted by GMcKenzie View Post
Payload includes all the stuff in the truck box. You must have the Max Trailering package (NHT) to get that payload number (mine is 2,015)
You are correct, but you must include everyone/thing in the cab plus fuel....
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:41 AM   #22
Phil Saran
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You are probably within the noted limits. My only question would be how does it stop?
I have a friend with a 5th wheel trailer and he used to tow with a Toyota Tundra it was ok until he went to Durango CO and burned out his brand new brake job because of the steep hills.


He came home and traded the truck in on a 2013 Dodge Ram 2500 diesel 4x4.


No complaints now.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:59 AM   #23
sourdough
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Originally Posted by Phil Saran View Post
You are probably within the noted limits. My only question would be how does it stop?
I have a friend with a 5th wheel trailer and he used to tow with a Toyota Tundra it was ok until he went to Durango CO and burned out his brand new brake job because of the steep hills.


He came home and traded the truck in on a 2013 Dodge Ram 2500 diesel 4x4.


No complaints now.

This brings up an interesting point. I watched a couple of videos by some truck guys a couple of years ago testing brakes on the big 3 plus Nissan and Toyota. They were towing a loaded trailer down the mountain at Eisenhower tunnel? if I recall and checking brake fade, temps etc. The Japanese trucks had significantly higher temps at the brakes, really high as I recall, compared to the big 3. Nissan and Toyota are making strides in trying to improve their trucks so they can compete with the American brands but the OP sure might want to check that out.
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Old 07-15-2018, 11:53 AM   #24
Wireman134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chay1950 View Post
My TV is a 2013 Tundra, 5.7L V8, towing package. GTWR is 10100 lbs.
I use a WDH rated at Max tongue weight of 1400 lbs and max gross trailer weight of 14000 lbs.

My trailer is a Springdale Summerland 2660RL.
Towable GVWR is 7645 lbs.
Hitch TWR 645 lbs

When the WDH is connected the axle weights are all below the max. The front of the truck goes from 36 1/2 in height w/o the WDH to 36 3/16 in w/ the WDH connected. That's a lowering of 5/16 in. The rear goes from 38 3/8 in to 36 in. So the truck is pretty level. The trailer is also level with the WDH connected.



That being said, can I assume that the tongue weight is within specs?
Take it to a Cat Scale. Weigh it with and without spring bars latched. Then weigh truck by it's self
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Old 07-15-2018, 02:58 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by chay1950 View Post
There are no markings on the truck hitch. It is welded to the truck frame. The only thing I can find is in the owner's manual under TWR (Trailer Weight Rating) is 10100 Lbs. This with towing package.
I bought my 2010 Tundra new with the tow package so the hitch receiver is from the factory. It is bolted to the frame. I too have never been able to find any indication what weights it is rated for. But Toyota says I can tow 10,500 lbs.
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:27 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by BrentB View Post
I bought my 2010 Tundra new with the tow package so the hitch receiver is from the factory. It is bolted to the frame. I too have never been able to find any indication what weights it is rated for. But Toyota says I can tow 10,500 lbs.
Not sure when Ford started this but on the F150 line they use the same receiver hitch on all models with trailer option whether it be Max Tow or not.
That is 600#/6000 trailer no weight distribution hitch and 1200#/12000 trailer with weight distribution hitch.
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:40 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by BrentB View Post
I bought my 2010 Tundra new .... I too have never been able to find any indication what weights it is rated for. But Toyota says I can tow 10,500 lbs.
There are two ratings (actually 4: two ball and two trailer) on your receiver. First is the maximum tongue weight and maximum trailer weight WITHOUT weight distribution. Next is the maximum tongue weight and maximum trailer weight WITH weight distribution.

Those two maximum (tongue and trailer) are significantly different with the application of a weight distribution hitch. That information is essential when towing and should be readily available in the owner's manual and/or on a decal on the receiver body. On Ford receivers, it's on a plate attached to the crossmember. This is a photo from the internet depicting the information for a receiver ratings. Your hitch has similar information located "somewhere"....

ADDED: As for chay1950's comments about his receiver being "welded" to the truck frame, I'd be very concerned with that receiver. I haven't seen a "factory OEM receiver" that is welded in place in the past 10 or 15 years (maybe even longer). All of them are currently bolted to the frame to preserve the frame strength and integrity.
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:03 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
There are two ratings (actually 4: two ball and two trailer) on your receiver. First is the maximum tongue weight and maximum trailer weight WITHOUT weight distribution. Next is the maximum tongue weight and maximum trailer weight WITH weight distribution.

Those two maximum (tongue and trailer) are significantly different with the application of a weight distribution hitch. That information is essential when towing and should be readily available in the owner's manual and/or on a decal on the receiver body. On Ford receivers, it's on a plate attached to the crossmember. This is a photo from the internet depicting the information for a receiver ratings. Your hitch has similar information located "somewhere"....

ADDED: As for chay1950's comments about his receiver being "welded" to the truck frame, I'd be very concerned with that receiver. I haven't seen a "factory OEM receiver" that is welded in place in the past 10 or 15 years (maybe even longer). All of them are currently bolted to the frame to preserve the frame strength and integrity.


The only time I recall seeing a receiver "welded" to the frame of truck is when I had an aftermarket receiver installed on a Ford truck by a hitch shop. The rest have all been bolted.
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Old 07-15-2018, 06:07 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by sourdough View Post
The only time I recall seeing a receiver "welded" to the frame of truck is when I had an aftermarket receiver installed on a Ford truck by a hitch shop. The rest have all been bolted.
The last receiver I've owned that was welded to the frame was a 1972 Dodge W200. That was also an aftermarket receiver. I can't remember any others that were welded, but I do remember that none since my 1999 F250 have been welded, all of them were bolted to the frame.

That's the reason for my concern with chay1950's statement that his receiver is welded to his frame. If so, it's very likely that it is not a Toyota receiver and it may or may not be rated the same as the OEM receiver. If it's aftermarket, it could be a class 3 receiver (class 3 and 4 are both 2"x2") he might be towing his trailer with a class 3 receiver that's rated at 350 pounds tongue weight and 3500 pounds trailer weight or maybe 600 pounds tongue weight and 6000 pounds trailer weight. Either way, the point is that the welded receiver probably isn't OEM and may be significantly under-rated for what he is towing.
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Old 07-16-2018, 05:05 PM   #30
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The independent hitch welding shops around here, (San Diego County) they weld up receiver hitches usually with 2"×2" material going through a square hole in a end plate that fits your particular vehical. That in turn is the mounting bracket to be bolted to your truck frame. So, the independent shops still or at least nowadays are bolted on. The independent shops also advertise that they are certified hitch welders. I have never heard of welded to the frame either.
I have heard from a friend that said my pintle hitch that is both bolted and welded to the receiver mounting plate has to be bolted if its welded. You can have just the 4 bolts holding it on. If its welded you have to have the 4 bolts also. He said highway patrol can write you up for safety violation.
Point is; bolting things up, if done properly is stronger in some cases.
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