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Old 11-28-2017, 06:22 PM   #31
rhagfo
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Originally Posted by notanlines View Post
I would respectfully, but vehemently disagree with the notion of deflating tires to run in the rain. I don't think the idea is acceptable from any angle.
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Originally Posted by rhagfo View Post
A tire inflated to max sidewall pressure may be overinflated for the load carried, as such reducing the contact patch with the road! This is NOt a good idea, you want the MAXIMUM CONTACT patch, not MAXIMUM PRESSURE unless you are running with tires at maximum load. You can find load inflation tables with the tire manufacturers web sites usually.

I live in the Wet Coast, trust me on this, this is not just for wet, you should always run the correct pressure of the load!
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Originally Posted by Alpine View Post
I agree with this also, but understand there is no mention of inflating the tire to max sidewall inflation.

The P225/65-17 on our Chevy Equinox have a max pressure of 44 psi for a capacity of 1,874# or a total of 7,496#, But the listed GVWR is only 5,070# hence the reason the tire is only inflated to 35 psi per the door post Payload sticker.
If I were to inflate to 44 psi then they would by definition be over inflated by 9 psi, or almost 26% for the application, but not the physical tire.

So I add to this another link.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiret...e.jsp?techid=1
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Old 11-29-2017, 04:33 AM   #32
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My Ram manual says to be careful using the exhaust brake while towing in slippery conditions. You could jack knife the rig.
I try to brake the truck, and trailer, rather than rely on the exhaust brake in rain.
Exactly. The exhaust brake could potentially lock up your drive tires on slippery roads. Even braking is more desirable. I live in the snow belt, drive a semi pulling doubles for a living, and trust me when the drives lock up the tractor goes sideways. I ain't telling you not too use it, but I rarely use it in bad weather. It all depends on grip and how much weight is on the wheels. I prefer to control my speed and following distance with proper braking.

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Old 11-29-2017, 04:37 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by ken56 View Post
No one has mentioned Trailer brake controller gain setting. Make sure your trailer wheels don't lock up on the slicker wet surface. Brake controller gain needs to be set according to conditions and most people just set it and leave it on that setting all the time. Not the correct procedure.
Also true.

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Old 11-29-2017, 06:02 AM   #34
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Exactly. The exhaust brake could potentially lock up your drive tires on slippery roads. Even braking is more desirable. I live in the snow belt, drive a semi pulling doubles for a living, and trust me when the drives lock up the tractor goes sideways. I ain't telling you not too use it, but I rarely use it in bad weather. It all depends on grip and how much weight is on the wheels. I prefer to control my speed and following distance with proper braking.

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I can see that and applaud your experience, but maybe we should define slippery. Wet roads or icy, snowy roads. Big difference, I think. Personally, I donít tow on snow or ice and have not had a problem in the rain by downshifting or using the exhaust brake. In my case, the two donít happen simultaneously, which Iíve heard happens with the newer, computer controlled systems of tow/haul automatic-EB combos. If thatís the case, it sounds like a negative ďimprovementĒ to assist the driving experience.
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Old 11-29-2017, 08:51 AM   #35
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My previous comment was addressed to the topic; towing in the rain. I will not ever attempt to tow on ice or snow, no matter what. I have towed many miles in the rain including on such roads as US 550 between Durango and Ouray and a number of similar roads w/o a problem using tow-haul and exhaust brake. I specifically stay off the brake pedal as much as possible and so far have kept the shiny side up. I don't dispute that using them on snow/ice could be a problem, but the same can be said about using brakes on slick surfaces.
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Old 11-29-2017, 12:08 PM   #36
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I can see that and applaud your experience, but maybe we should define slippery. Wet roads or icy, snowy roads. Big difference, I think. Personally, I donít tow on snow or ice and have not had a problem in the rain by downshifting or using the exhaust brake. In my case, the two donít happen simultaneously, which Iíve heard happens with the newer, computer controlled systems of tow/haul automatic-EB combos. If thatís the case, it sounds like a negative ďimprovementĒ to assist the driving experience.
Agreed, my "simple" definition of slippery would be the opposite of grip. Grip is when the exhaust brake is not strong enough to stop the drive axle from turning, slippery is when the exhaust brake IS strong enough to stop the drive axle from turning. Rain alone would probably not be slippery. I am just advising to use caution. What if there were an oily spot in the road that was also wet? Additionally your rig is always the same rig with the same weight or down pressure on the rear wheels. For me the down pressure on the drives can vary by 10,000 lbs. A set of empties on a rainy road would not be the ideal conditions to use an exhaust brake. All that said, I do use the exhaust brake in the rain sometimes, not saying I dont. I'm just warning people that an exhaust brake is not the easy answer to every towing situation.
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Old 11-29-2017, 12:26 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Barbell View Post
My previous comment was addressed to the topic; towing in the rain. I will not ever attempt to tow on ice or snow, no matter what. I have towed many miles in the rain including on such roads as US 550 between Durango and Ouray and a number of similar roads w/o a problem using tow-haul and exhaust brake. I specifically stay off the brake pedal as much as possible and so far have kept the shiny side up. I don't dispute that using them on snow/ice could be a problem, but the same can be said about using brakes on slick surfaces.
Heres the difference, IF the exhaust brake locks up your drives you WILL go into a slide. A slide begins when one axle is turning slower than the others, either because of bad brake balance or an exhaust btrake. A slide also begins if one axle is turning faster than the others, mostly the drives from applying to much power. So the idea is to keep all wheels turning at the same speed. I have no problem believing what you say is working for you. But intentionally staying off the brakes as much as possible makes no sense. If they are adjusted properly then use them. If you drive that same truck empty do you use your brakes in the rain? Of course you do. I promise you I drive a lot of miles in the snow every winter and I use the brakes, not the exhaust brake. If I used the exhaust brake exclusively I'd be in the ditch. Again, I'm not telling people to not use it in the rain I'm just trying to show exactly what's going on and that it COULD get them in trouble. While we're on the subject I would add that driving these trucks empty in the rain is probably not an ideal situation to use an exhaust brake. Your mileage may vary,
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Old 11-29-2017, 12:30 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by larry337 View Post
Agreed, my "simple" definition of slippery would be the opposite of grip. Grip is when the exhaust brake is not strong enough to stop the drive axle from turning, slippery is when the exhaust brake IS strong enough to stop the drive axle from turning. Rain alone would probably not be slippery. I am just advising to use caution. What if there were an oily spot in the road that was also wet? Additionally your rig is always the same rig with the same weight or down pressure on the rear wheels. For me the down pressure on the drives can vary by 10,000 lbs. A set of empties on a rainy road would not be the ideal conditions to use an exhaust brake. All that said, I do use the exhaust brake in the rain sometimes, not saying I dont. I'm just warning people that an exhaust brake is not the easy answer to every towing situation.
And that is enough info now for folks to decide for themselves as to whether they choose to use the EB or not. Certainly preferable to them never using the EB in the rain (to their possible detriment) because the book advises against it or they don’t have enough knowledge or experience to judge for themselves.

Goes back to my point awhile back on another thread about education vs dumbing down. Better to have all the facts and decide for yourself. At least that’s my vote.

PS My dad drove trucks, and he was good. Put a lot of food on the table, and was a great example and teacher. I have a lot of respect for good truck drivers.
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Old 11-29-2017, 12:41 PM   #39
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And that is enough info now for folks to decide for themselves as to whether they choose to use the EB or not. Certainly preferable to them never using the EB in the rain (to their possible detriment) because the book advises against it or they donít have enough knowledge or experience to judge for themselves.

Goes back to my point awhile back on another thread about education vs dumbing down. Better to have all the facts and decide for yourself. At least thatís my vote.

PS My dad drove trucks, and he was good. Put a lot of food on the table, and was a great example and teacher. I have a lot of respect for good truck drivers.
Exactly
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