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Old 01-15-2020, 07:50 AM   #21
Snoking
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Originally Posted by +Ruff Rider View Post
I can't believe you people suggesting running underinflated tires. How dangerous is that? Well let me tell you. Underinflated tires run hotter than they are supposed to and for another thing most RVers never tow in the winter when the temps are cold. So some are suggesting underinflated tires during hot temps. Then you fret if the tires on the trailer are 5 pounds under 110 PSI and find some need to carry a air compressor. There are things you can do to make the truck ride better but under inflating tires isn't one of them. My sticker in the door says 65 front 80 rear. I guess that's a suggestion. So some believe one sticker and disregard the other. Go figure.
Door sticker are for Max axle ratings. Do you drive around at Max load on your axles all the time?
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Old 01-15-2020, 10:49 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by rhagfo View Post
Running the Rear tires at 80 psi, is like having Flintstone Tires on your Dually!

The OP has not stated the year or model of his Cougar 5er, depending on loaded rear axle weight he could likely run as low as 55 psi in his rear tires.

ON EDIT: Just looked at the Keystone site likely has a 338RLK with a 12,490# GVWR. I tow a 32' Copper Canyon and it weighs at 12,500# and a 2,700# pin, currently run about 60 psi. I have not scaled hooked up yet, but will do it in the not too distance future.
You're correct on the max load, meant to say expected or max actual load.
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Old 01-15-2020, 12:06 PM   #23
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My RV isn't at max loads ether yet I keep them to the pressure on the tire. I always keep my truck tires aired up to the pressures on the sticker. There is no minimum pressure listed on the sticker or tires. I don't have time to air up and down the tires on my truck. It just doesn't make any sense to me to lower the pressures every time I hook and unhook the trailer. I also rotate my tires to get the most tire wear from them. I adjust the tire pressures to reflect the sticker in the door. I put the back on the front so I air them accordingly.
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Old 01-15-2020, 01:22 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by +Ruff Rider View Post
I can't believe you people suggesting running underinflated tires. How dangerous is that? Well let me tell you. Underinflated tires run hotter than they are supposed to and for another thing most RVers never tow in the winter when the temps are cold. So some are suggesting underinflated tires during hot temps. Then you fret if the tires on the trailer are 5 pounds under 110 PSI and find some need to carry a air compressor. There are things you can do to make the truck ride better but under inflating tires isn't one of them. My sticker in the door says 65 front 80 rear. I guess that's a suggestion. So some believe one sticker and disregard the other. Go figure.
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Door sticker are for Max axle ratings. Do you drive around at Max load on your axles all the time?
This is so interesting Ruff Rider likely has a SRW truck, this discussion is about a DRW, my door sticker on our DRW states 65 psi for full 9,750# on rear axle. I inflate to load and run about 55 to 60 psi, which is not under inflated. Tire is inflated for load carried, running 80 psi on a SRW unloaded is grossly over inflated.
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Old 01-15-2020, 01:50 PM   #25
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This is so interesting Ruff Rider likely has a SRW truck, this discussion is about a DRW, my door sticker on our DRW states 65 psi for full 9,750# on rear axle. I inflate to load and run about 55 to 60 psi, which is not under inflated. Tire is inflated for load carried, running 80 psi on a SRW unloaded is grossly over inflated.
I have called Michelin several times about inflation and they always say that if you know your weights then inflate to the inflation table. They also state that an over inflated tire in more likely to get road hazard damage and the tire is not as effective when braking, which they state is a safety issue. Chris
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Old 01-15-2020, 04:06 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Snoking View Post
I have called Michelin several times about inflation and they always say that if you know your weights then inflate to the inflation table. They also state that an over inflated tire in more likely to get road hazard damage and the tire is not as effective when braking, which they state is a safety issue. Chris



The highlighted part is something everyone needs to think about SRW or DRW because it is a fact.

An overinflated tire just does not have the grip of a properly inflated tire in full, grabby contact with the pavement. It DOES increase the possibility of tire damage. When I first bought my last 3/4 ton the sticker said 65 front, 80 rear and it was aired to that. Initially I dropped the rear to 65 like the front and all was well. Took the trailer up to the mountains, set up and took off looking at "stuff". There was a road leading to a lake that had been paved at one time but was deteriorated to the point it was almost gravel. But, there, up ahead, with no time to change course was a huge pothole in some remnant of the pavement. Hit it and kept right on going. Loaded up and went home. A couple months later I was getting ready to head to FL. Took the truck in for rotate/balance and just general check it over. On a Saturday, leave Monday. I find a big gash in the sidewall where I hit the pothole. Never lost air but it was deep. The owner of the store said it would probably be OK to use if I had a spare. I just told him "not happenin". No tire that size there so.....next day, Sunday, I found a tire store open in "the city" with that size and brand of tire and it was replaced.

Long story to just say 2 things; inflated to max pressure had everything to do with the damage that tire incurred I am sure and 2) don't wait until the last workday before you leave on a big trip to check your tires.....
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Old 01-16-2020, 06:02 AM   #27
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I can't believe this is ongoing, but, you probably should get a class A and get rid of what you have.


A truck is a truck...it won't really change.
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Old 01-16-2020, 07:06 AM   #28
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I can't believe this is ongoing, but, you probably should get a class A and get rid of what you have.


A truck is a truck...it won't really change.
I agree. Lincoln tried to get into the truck market with the Mark LT. It was an "attempt to provide a luxury truck that does what a work truck does"... That concept lasted a couple of years and they gave up trying to produce a Lincoln disguised as a truck.

Lipstick on a pig is still "bacon in the making"....
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Old Yesterday, 08:52 AM   #29
+Ruff Rider
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Originally Posted by sourdough View Post
[/COLOR]


The highlighted part is something everyone needs to think about SRW or DRW because it is a fact.

An overinflated tire just does not have the grip of a properly inflated tire in full, grabby contact with the pavement. It DOES increase the possibility of tire damage. When I first bought my last 3/4 ton the sticker said 65 front, 80 rear and it was aired to that. Initially I dropped the rear to 65 like the front and all was well. Took the trailer up to the mountains, set up and took off looking at "stuff". There was a road leading to a lake that had been paved at one time but was deteriorated to the point it was almost gravel. But, there, up ahead, with no time to change course was a huge pothole in some remnant of the pavement. Hit it and kept right on going. Loaded up and went home. A couple months later I was getting ready to head to FL. Took the truck in for rotate/balance and just general check it over. On a Saturday, leave Monday. I find a big gash in the sidewall where I hit the pothole. Never lost air but it was deep. The owner of the store said it would probably be OK to use if I had a spare. I just told him "not happenin". No tire that size there so.....next day, Sunday, I found a tire store open in "the city" with that size and brand of tire and it was replaced.

Long story to just say 2 things; inflated to max pressure had everything to do with the damage that tire incurred I am sure and 2) don't wait until the last workday before you leave on a big trip to check your tires.....
In response; so if you inflate your truck tires to the load. How do you know the load? There is no way you know how much unless you weigh every time you go out. Then another thing, you always inflate the trailer tires to max pressure correct yet you have absolutely how much it weighs on any given trip.
Another thing I noticed is some trailers have 7,000 pound axles yet the max load is 16,000 pounds, Now I know 7+7=14,000 so Why do manufactures do this?
As for the pot hole a under inflated tire may sustain the same damage. There is no way of knowing that a fully pressurized tire will blow out hitting a pot hole.
More on air pressure. In your car do you add or remove air because you have fewer people in your car? You do know that cars have a max load also. I bet that you go by the yellow sticker in the door for tire inflation and not some stupid chart. Other wise you would need to weigh everyone and inflate according to load. I bet you didn't know that there is a max load for cars also.
So if the yellow sticker is the towing bible than the tire pressure on that same sticker should be gospel don't you think? Or do we chose that the yellow sticker is just a suggestion and only follow some of it?
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Old Yesterday, 09:58 AM   #30
sourdough
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Originally Posted by +Ruff Rider View Post
In response; so if you inflate your truck tires to the load. How do you know the load? There is no way you know how much unless you weigh every time you go out. Then another thing, you always inflate the trailer tires to max pressure correct yet you have absolutely how much it weighs on any given trip.
Another thing I noticed is some trailers have 7,000 pound axles yet the max load is 16,000 pounds, Now I know 7+7=14,000 so Why do manufactures do this?
As for the pot hole a under inflated tire may sustain the same damage. There is no way of knowing that a fully pressurized tire will blow out hitting a pot hole.
More on air pressure. In your car do you add or remove air because you have fewer people in your car? You do know that cars have a max load also. I bet that you go by the yellow sticker in the door for tire inflation and not some stupid chart. Other wise you would need to weigh everyone and inflate according to load. I bet you didn't know that there is a max load for cars also.
So if the yellow sticker is the towing bible than the tire pressure on that same sticker should be gospel don't you think? Or do we chose that the yellow sticker is just a suggestion and only follow some of it?

To answer your questions;

I don't know about you but my trailer stays loaded pretty much the same for every trip. Once weighed I know within reason what it's going to weigh. As far as the truck I inflate to recommended cold pressure temps (max pressure on the HD truck) any time I tow. If not I lower it to around 65psi normally. Why? Some mental notes; if you have a passenger car or light truck they come with "P" tires. Note that on the sticker in those vehicles the recommended pressure is less than the max pressure on the tire generally (ie; recommended 44psi vs max of 51 example). I've not read specifically but pretty sure that it is because they are "light" duty vehicles and the expected use is not the same as the HD truck. Now, on all HD trucks I've seen (Ram) the recommended max cold pressure is the same as the max pressure on the sidewall (rear). Why? Again, not seen the documentation but it is an HD truck and assumed to be used for HD "stuff", hence the recommendation for max pressure. Why isn't the front rated for 80psi instead of 65psi? The front weight isn't going to vary much but the rear can be subjected to XXX loads so to err on the side of safety (CYA) they recommend max pressures.

I inflate my trailer tires to max pressure because 1) I've had a blowout and don't want it to happen again. Low pressures and sidewall flex will do that to you, 2)my trailer tows and rides better with them at max pressure.

Your observations on trailer axles vs gvw is correct. What you are missing is the fact that the manufacturer subtracts the tongue/pin weight of the trailer THEN calculates what the axles and tires will be resulting in the kind of numbers you give.

As far as the pothole tire damage; yes, an underinflated tire can sustain damage as well as an overinflated tire. Here's the difference; I've driven millions of miles in all kinds of vehicles, with all kinds of tires with all kinds of pressure in them. I've experimented countless times with hard tires, soft tires and in between. An overinflated tire hitting a jagged pothole will cut; and underinflated tire will more likely split, cut and deflate....that's just the way it is in my experience and I feel confident in my assumption.

As far as passenger cars....I'll bet I knew every question...and answer you posed - this ain't my first rodeo. I no longer drive passenger cars but when I did I actually didn't go by any chart or door sticker. I adjusted pressure dictated by the way the tire hit the pavement as illustrated by a chalk line across the tread. I didn't need to "weigh" the vehicle every time I got in it because I knew enough about my tires, and my load, to know what was going on with the tires.

So the yellow sticker is the bible as far as weights but we choose not to follow the tire pressures? This question is kind of pointless. If you will read the load/weight placard, the owner's manual etc. you will see that they say those weights listed "shall not exceed", "must not exceed" etc. We talk about exceeding those weights - not a soul I've seen says you can't run below them. Tires on the other hand have a "recommended" tire pressure setting on a passenger tire that will be inflated to the expected use of the tire - generally below max rating on the tire. You have the upper limit (max pressure on tire) that they can be inflated to if your load increases and they can be deflated by some measure for other circumstances. I used to run 10-15psi in my offroad tires depending on what I was doing. HD trucks (Ram anyway) lists the max pressure allowed on the tire on the placard for the rear. The only logical explanation is CYA. I certainly don't need that load capability when empty (which is most of the time) and have the common sense to know that - and don't like to be pounded needlessly. Hopefully that helps you out.
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Old Yesterday, 10:46 AM   #31
Brantlyj
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Originally Posted by +Ruff Rider View Post
In response; so if you inflate your truck tires to the load. How do you know the load? There is no way you know how much unless you weigh every time you go out. Then another thing, you always inflate the trailer tires to max pressure correct yet you have absolutely how much it weighs on any given trip.
Another thing I noticed is some trailers have 7,000 pound axles yet the max load is 16,000 pounds, Now I know 7+7=14,000 so Why do manufactures do this?
As for the pot hole a under inflated tire may sustain the same damage. There is no way of knowing that a fully pressurized tire will blow out hitting a pot hole.
More on air pressure. In your car do you add or remove air because you have fewer people in your car? You do know that cars have a max load also. I bet that you go by the yellow sticker in the door for tire inflation and not some stupid chart. Other wise you would need to weigh everyone and inflate according to load. I bet you didn't know that there is a max load for cars also.
So if the yellow sticker is the towing bible than the tire pressure on that same sticker should be gospel don't you think? Or do we chose that the yellow sticker is just a suggestion and only follow some of it?

I think your taking this way to personally. If you want to follow the sticker knock yourself out.

80% of the time trucks run empty. Even that trip to menards isn't putting a lot of weight in the back, so it's not a big deal to run at 65 psi. No one is suggesting you weight the truck each time you have a weight change. Take an educated guess and run that PSI.
Running at 80 psi empty will be overinflated. Possibly creating a smaller contact patch in the middle which will wear out the center of the tire quicker. Also the sidewall will now be stiffer and when you hit that bump in the road the back end will bounce which looses traction ability.

My truck is also a work truck. I routinely have a ton pallet of livestock feed in the back so I run 70-75 psi.

The reason why running max psi in a trailer tire even if you not at max weight is to keep the sidewall as stiff as possible. Since the tires are fixed, when you go into a turn they scrub. The tighter the turn the more stress on the sidewall as its literally dragged sideways. If you had underinflated tires there is a very real possibility of the tire folding and getting ripped off the rim. I have personally seen it on a semi.
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Old Yesterday, 07:07 PM   #32
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I run my trailer tires at 110 psi as they will time out before any excess ware. Never find cabinets open or items out of place. Inflation to 16160, scale hitched to truck 13,660. Truck tires always 70 - 65 on the dually.Hitched truck weight is 12,240. On some bridges all gets bouncy but never over 65 mph may help. Solo the 200# hitch stays in along with the aux tank full, another 500#. Rides as good or better than my srw 350.
Class A -- I have the T shirt. A gasser will be no different. A DP with air ride will be better but a different bounce -- there are passenger seatbelts for a reason. In addition to a toad you will need close to $500K, don't forget the tag axel. Figure $4-5k annual maintenance, some years less some more.
There is at least 1 company that has RV shock absorber kits.
Although I swear at some roads my ride seems far better than OPs. Payload of 5598 appreciates a 3k plus pin.
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