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Old 06-28-2019, 10:28 AM   #71
GMcKenzie
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Originally Posted by travelin texans View Post
Actual weight doesn't matter, they will go by the registered GVW of the rv posted on the label affixed to each rv.
And just like any other reason to use weights, the "dry weight" means nothing!!!
The ICBC publications make it sound like actual weight matters, not the GVW.

From here https://www.icbc.com/driver-licensin...creational.pdf

"A Class 4, 5 or 7 (novice) driverís licence allows you to tow a trailer weighing up to 4,600 kg gross vehicle weight (GVW). GVW refers to the combined weight of the towed vehicle (trailer) and its load. If a trailer weighs 4,000 kg when empty you may tow the trailer with a Class 4, 5 or 7 (novice) driverís licence. However, once you load the trailer with food, water and/or other items the GVW may exceed 4,600 kg."

Having said that, I would not rely on not being at my GVW if there was an issue where I needed insurance and would go by the rated max, and not what it actually weighs.
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Old 06-28-2019, 11:04 AM   #72
sonofcy
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Originally Posted by travelin texans View Post
Actual weight doesn't matter, they will go by the registered GVW of the rv posted on the label affixed to each rv.
And just like any other reason to use weights, the "dry weight" means nothing!!!
It's really important to use the correct terminology because the ICBC use GVW in a totally different manner.
What you are calling GVW in your post is actually GVWR, GVW is what the vehicle weighs at this moment and the factory has no knowledge of that since you put a toolbox in the back and so on. The GVWR is the max a truck can weigh as determined by engineering practices and the relevant authorities. The ICBC defines GVW as 150% of the actual weight which we call GVW. Confused? I have been going back and forth for the last two days with the ICBC folks and have decided to leave sleeping dogs lie. They are so messed up it's unbelievable. I won't post any of it here because of potential unwanted repercussions. Just to give you a hint of how bad this is, the GVW on my truck does NOT take into account my 16,705lb trailer!!! You read the documentation and tell me if they know what they are doing. If you want the doc msg me.
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Old 06-29-2019, 09:43 AM   #73
GMcKenzie
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Originally Posted by sonofcy View Post
It's really important to use the correct terminology because the ICBC use GVW in a totally different manner.
What you are calling GVW in your post is actually GVWR, GVW is what the vehicle weighs at this moment and the factory has no knowledge of that since you put a toolbox in the back and so on. The GVWR is the max a truck can weigh as determined by engineering practices and the relevant authorities. The ICBC defines GVW as 150% of the actual weight which we call GVW. Confused? I have been going back and forth for the last two days with the ICBC folks and have decided to leave sleeping dogs lie. They are so messed up it's unbelievable. I won't post any of it here because of potential unwanted repercussions. Just to give you a hint of how bad this is, the GVW on my truck does NOT take into account my 16,705lb trailer!!! You read the documentation and tell me if they know what they are doing. If you want the doc msg me.
It seems to me the trailer weight is not part of the GVWR, but comes under the GCVWR. The truck GVW would include the pin/tongue weight of the trailer though.
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Old 06-29-2019, 09:59 AM   #74
sonofcy
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Originally Posted by GMcKenzie View Post
It seems to me the trailer weight is not part of the GVWR, but comes under the GCVWR. The truck GVW would include the pin/tongue weight of the trailer though.
Damn, I also got this wrong. Now corrected

Bottom line all they want is the payload number but don't know enough to take it from the yellow sticker so they force you into giving a best guess unloaded wt that they then multiply by 1.5 and tax you on that.

Correct, GCWR is the truck GVWR + the trailer GVWR.
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Old 06-29-2019, 10:25 AM   #75
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Sorry guys, I screwed this up. I have corrected the post.

Doh, now I get it. In simple terms it's truck payload. There choice of the initials GVW is unfortunate since it is almost the reverse of what the rest of the world uses. The 2nd highlight above is the key, it says you only include the tongue weight (they do not say pin but do say fifth wheel). The first highlight in my opinion contradicts but hey, it's government. They could have just said payload.

Just to complete the thought.

Payload = GVWR - GVW NOT the ICBC GVW, but the real world GVW. GVW in the real world is called dry weight for a trailer, curb weight for a truck and also used to specify what the truck normally weighs in day to day operation. A recent post showed a new chevy truck with a plaque on it that stated the curb wt, payload GVWR, GCWR, and more. Look for it under the thread 'Chevy towing capacity'
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Old 06-29-2019, 02:14 PM   #76
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People are still have issue with the terms.

GVW is scaled weight of the TV or trailer loaded.
CGWR is the manufactures rating for the combined TV and trailer.

Will add another term for you.

What is the tare weight?
Tare weight /ˈtɛər/, sometimes called unladen weight, is the weight of an empty vehicle or container. By subtracting it from the gross weight (laden weight), the weight of the goods carried (the net weight) may be determined.
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Old 06-29-2019, 03:10 PM   #77
sonofcy
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Originally Posted by Snoking View Post
People are still have issue with the terms.

GVW is scaled weight of the TV or trailer loaded.
CGVWR is the manufactures rating for the combined TV and trailer.

Will add another term for you.

What is the tare weight?
Tare weight /ˈtɛər/, sometimes called unladen weight, is the weight of an empty vehicle or container. By subtracting it from the gross weight (laden weight), the weight of the goods carried (the net weight) may be determined.
True (other than the GCWR spelling) From my trucks online brochure - 41,800 lbs. max. Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR)
The ICBC folks here have co opted the GVW term. They are using that acronym for what is actually payload. What you and I call GVW they call net weight.
What I get on google is GVW is the total weight of the truck and payload at a point in time and is how I understand it too. Because of the incorrect way they do it I am paying a higher license fee so I will continue to beat on them.
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Old 07-02-2019, 04:52 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by sonofcy View Post
Where the government messed up is asking us to take a class 1 vehicle inspection test. If you don't get an instructor you have no chance at passing. The driving test isn't that bad though, just the pre-trip.
that's not true, yes it is a class 1 inspection and yes there are some curve balls. the list of everything you have to check is in the book, if not I could scan my test page, if I can find it.

the biggest thing is that you have to do it by the book, I did fail the first one but it wasn't because I didn't know what to check, it was because I assumed that when I checked my first tire and rattled off what all I was looking at/for, then commented that I would be checking every tire for this that that would be ok.. apparently not you have to say the whole spiel at every tire also if you don't have an oil pressure gauge you still have to say I am checking my oil pressure

you only have 25 min to do the test and when I went for my second one 5 days later I made sure to waist every 25 min of there time.

but yes I do know some people who have paid a sum of money to a commercial instructor to teach them and they have had mixed results, just take it seriously and stud/ask questions and you'll be fine.

Steve
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Old 07-02-2019, 10:13 AM   #79
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that's not true, yes it is a class 1 inspection and yes there are some curve balls. the list of everything you have to check is in the book, if not I could scan my test page, if I can find it.

the biggest thing is that you have to do it by the book, I did fail the first one but it wasn't because I didn't know what to check, it was because I assumed that when I checked my first tire and rattled off what all I was looking at/for, then commented that I would be checking every tire for this that that would be ok.. apparently not you have to say the whole spiel at every tire also if you don't have an oil pressure gauge you still have to say I am checking my oil pressure

you only have 25 min to do the test and when I went for my second one 5 days later I made sure to waist every 25 min of there time.

but yes I do know some people who have paid a sum of money to a commercial instructor to teach them and they have had mixed results, just take it seriously and stud/ask questions and you'll be fine.

Steve
I had a longert reply but the system wiped it out. Short answer is.
You must have got the easy tester first try, we kept getting the hard tester, once we got the easy tester we passed.
What is the point of going inside the RV to turn off the gas at the stove if it's already off at the tank. This is a rather obvious example of a bureaucrat making up the test because they have never owned or probably even been in an RV.
What is the point of pretending to check your tires and wheels if they don't at least have you produce your torque wrench and explain how to use it?
If they are concerned about safety then making TPMS mandatory on all 8-12 tires would be a good start. I frankly don't give a damn if you have an accident because you lost a tire at 100KPH, I do care if you do that in front of me however.
The pre-trip is a memory test. I have memory issues which is why I use a checklist, but they will not allow me to use a checklist or any of the modern tools on and in my truck. If you have ever seen anybody in a campground let alone a fuel stop doing a full pre-trip then I would be very surprised. I also have not noticed any truckers doing much more than checking tires and occasionally connections. When is the last time a big truck which has 2 batteries and alternators like mine has had a safety incident due to not checking the batteries and/or alternators? I have 10 TPMS sensors with pressure and temperature reporting but the one thing I always do at a stop is get out my $30 infrared detector and check my tires, brakes, and bearing hub temperatures because not doing so could lead to the death of me, my wife, and my dog. I do NOT pull my emergency brake activator because as an electrician I know that doing that leads to possible earlier failure of the contacts. It is obvious from the responses on this forum that a lot/many of BC residents are not properly licensed and subsequently not insured. This concerns me because if they have an accident with me then I would have to sue them instead of their insurance company. One fellow even reported that as a 40 year BC resident, 30 years towing heavy he has NEVER heard of the need of an endorsement 7. Strange how I as a new resident (from a province with NO licensing requirements) not only found the information on my own but was properly insured with a couple of weeks of getting here. It's easily found on both the web and the brochure in every ICBC office. The staff at at least one of those ICBC offices are clueless however. They wanted to see my RV so they asked if I could pull it in front of their office. This was on main street with cars parked on both sides. I drive an F450 towing a 40'9" fifth wheel but she was clueless as to why I couldn't just park it in one of the 3 parking spaces even though I might have to sit on the street for anywhere up to an hour waiting for enough spaces to open up in a row to park 60 odd feet of rig. BTW, they marked my paperwork as needing an endorsement 8! I guess that means I can tow a heavy RV + 1. The pre-trip is just a standard government tax grab.
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Old 07-03-2019, 04:33 AM   #80
Stircrazy
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Originally Posted by sonofcy View Post
You must have got the easy tester first try, we kept getting the hard tester, once we got the easy tester we passed.


I guess that means I can tow a heavy RV + 1. The pre-trip is just a standard government tax grab.
nope I had the hard one first tray, that is why I had to do a second. on the second I had the same one but I made sure I knew everything on there marking sheet like the back of my hand and then some extras.

I also do agree that it is nothing but a combination of a tax grab, by failing you they can charge an extra 15 bucks for the retest, and government laziness. there is no reason some one couldn't have come up with a more appropriate walk around in about 30 min instead of just crossing over a commercial one.

this does seam to come up in the news stream about every 5 years or so. I have only lived in BC for 29 years and I knew about this requirement about 20 years ago, just never applied to me until 3 years ago, and I wasn't quite sure where the cut off was.

Steve
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