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Old 09-08-2017, 04:56 AM   #11
ctbruce
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Originally Posted by bsmith0404 View Post
With the new 18 cu ft RV refers the advantages of the residential fridge have pretty much been eliminated. I'd stay with a system that has multiple options for power. If your 110v electrical system ever goes out in the RV, many times the 12v and LP are still working and therefore so is your refer
I'd stay away, far away, from a residential fridge. Too many things to go wrong.

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Old 09-09-2017, 05:42 PM   #12
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The absorption units work well, I will not change
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Old 09-09-2017, 07:30 PM   #13
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My last RV style Dometic fridge lasted 16 years with only a burner cleaning. It had gotten to the point where the freezer worked perfectly but the fridge wouldn't cool below 40 to 50 degrees. The only other negative was the amount of time to cool down any absorption unit and the cringe every time someone opened the door for longer than I felt was necessary since I know it had to cool the interior back down again.

Now we have the residential fridge and the 1000W inverter. The plusses are its huge, it cools down fast, its huge, it has an icemaker, its huge, and its side by side with bottom freezer. There are many negatives and mostly you will hear about the power consumption. However, I think the biggest may be the fact the manual says my Samsung must not be operated in temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. This might be one of the biggest reasons for all the premature failures we read about. Bouncing down the road could be the other reason.

After one season, it works for my camping needs but I did have to run 50 amp power to the trailer at the house so I could set the AC to run during the day and keep it cool enough inside. I guess I'll update this post in 16 years(less if I have problems like others have).
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Old 09-10-2017, 05:58 AM   #14
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^^Sounds like you're wanting to keep the fridge running while you have it in storage at home? If I didn't do that and only plugged in to a 20amp 110volt household circuit to cool it down immediately before a trip, what do you think the odds of survival would be? Does the residential fridge always pull off the inverter, even when the trailer is hooked up to 110volt AC? I assume a 20amp circuit is big enough to charge the dedicated refrigerator batteries through its inverter, with nothing else running.
I have no confidence in our Dometic RV refrigerator. The residential unit sounds appealing but....
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Old 09-10-2017, 06:00 AM   #15
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What fridge to get?

If his inverter is like most used it should be a "pass through" style meaning it will allow 110VAC "through" it while plugged into shore power.

IMO residential fridges belong in a permanent residence. RV fridges belong in RV's. Yeah maybe a residential refer gets cold faster and is bigger, but you'll never convince me it was built to bounce down the road, and the doors won't stay closed without adding some type of travel lock.

I have used RV refers since my first fiver in '89 and haven't ever had a failure. Am I lucky or is it the fact that they are made for RV application. BTW all my refers have been Dometic.
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Old 09-10-2017, 06:26 AM   #16
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My Dometic 1350 has been trouble from day 1. It may go back to the shop this winter. I don't know if it's flaming out or what. One morning it will be 34 degrees, next morning 46. We haven't used it this summer but hoping for a trip or 2 this fall. I'll refresh my memory of what it's doing. May be changing out 5th's in 18-36 months and debating what to do.
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Old 09-10-2017, 06:56 AM   #17
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For those who remember "ice boxes" and the first refrigerators with the compressor mounted on top, domestic refrigeration has come a long way. Back in the 40's and early 50's the concept of refrigeration in homes was in its infancy. Absorption refrigeration was also an "up and coming" technology, but didn't catch on in S&B homes. It did, however become the "industry standard" for RV use. Through the years absorption refrigeration has evolved into a very reliable and efficient means to travel with food that requires being stored cold.

Just as absorption refrigeration has "evolved" for RV's, compressor refrigeration has "evolved" for the S&B home. There are some significant differences between the two and frankly, compressor refrigeration for RV's is in its infancy. There are some problems that so far have not been solved. Ambient temperature, vibration, power source, ice maker technology (extra power for the heating part to release the cubes) and reliability are significant "hurdles" that have not yet been conquered. In years to come, I'd suspect that S&B technology (the current level of domestic refrigerator in RV's) will evolve into "built for RV use" models. Right now, that's not the situation and RV manufacturers are using the "lowest bid" models that will fit the available space in the kitchen. It's pretty much a "you get what you pay for" situation in which there isn't a specific model suited for the environment, so Keystone (and others) are installing the cheapest brand that will meet most of the requirements and they're adding "don't do's" to the owner's manual warning RV'ers about the limitations, some of which are "impossible to overcome" types of limits, such as towing in Arizona during July with a Samsung refrigerator..... Ain't happening on a regular basis, if even the first time.....

This kind of evolution will continue to give RV'ers a better product, but just as "grandma's refrigerator" is a relic, in years to come, the Samsung domestic refrigerator will be a "relic" and newer models will be much improved.

Until then, absorption refrigeration is "already there" in terms of reliability and convenience, even if you can't stand in front of the refrigerator, door open and "graze the food choices"...... For me, I'll let someone else suffer through the "growing pains" of trying to adapt a S&B technology to RV use.....
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:36 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
For those who remember "ice boxes" and the first refrigerators with the compressor mounted on top, domestic refrigeration has come a long way. Back in the 40's and early 50's the concept of refrigeration in homes was in its infancy. Absorption refrigeration was also an "up and coming" technology, but didn't catch on in S&B homes. It did, however become the "industry standard" for RV use. Through the years absorption refrigeration has evolved into a very reliable and efficient means to travel with food that requires being stored cold.

Just as absorption refrigeration has "evolved" for RV's, compressor refrigeration has "evolved" for the S&B home. There are some significant differences between the two and frankly, compressor refrigeration for RV's is in its infancy. There are some problems that so far have not been solved. Ambient temperature, vibration, power source, ice maker technology (extra power for the heating part to release the cubes) and reliability are significant "hurdles" that have not yet been conquered. In years to come, I'd suspect that S&B technology (the current level of domestic refrigerator in RV's) will evolve into "built for RV use" models. Right now, that's not the situation and RV manufacturers are using the "lowest bid" models that will fit the available space in the kitchen. It's pretty much a "you get what you pay for" situation in which there isn't a specific model suited for the environment, so Keystone (and others) are installing the cheapest brand that will meet most of the requirements and they're adding "don't do's" to the owner's manual warning RV'ers about the limitations, some of which are "impossible to overcome" types of limits, such as towing in Arizona during July with a Samsung refrigerator..... Ain't happening on a regular basis, if even the first time.....

This kind of evolution will continue to give RV'ers a better product, but just as "grandma's refrigerator" is a relic, in years to come, the Samsung domestic refrigerator will be a "relic" and newer models will be much improved.

Until then, absorption refrigeration is "already there" in terms of reliability and convenience, even if you can't stand in front of the refrigerator, door open and "graze the food choices"...... For me, I'll let someone else suffer through the "growing pains" of trying to adapt a S&B technology to RV use.....
The Dometic refer in our Cougar sure beats the tin lined, fiberglass insulated ice box (one compartment for food and an upper compartment for a 25# block of ice) that we had in our old cab over p/u camper. Happy to have it!!

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Old 09-10-2017, 10:01 AM   #19
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I assume a 20amp circuit is big enough to charge the dedicated refrigerator batteries through its inverter, with nothing else running.
Yes 20 is enough to keep the batteries topped "and" run the samsung fridge. I did that with 15 amps. Just be sure any extension cord you use is higher than normal gauge wire to prevent voltage drops that could damage the compressor.
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Old 09-10-2017, 01:30 PM   #20
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I have had a failure on my Samsung fridge. Went through a lot of trouble and had Samsung refund my purchase price. I then purchased the same model from Lowes. Maybe I am asking for trouble but I believe that residential fridges will work in RV's. I would recommend installing a good surge protector as the spikes from changing power sources may be a cause for some of the issues. I also plan on installing shock absorbers on the suspension to help smooth out the ride of the trailer.
I have had issues with RV fridges in the past so they all can fail.
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