Go Back   Keystone RV Forums > Keystone Tech Forums > Tires, Tires, Tires!
Click Here to Login

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-12-2018, 06:54 AM   #51
flybouy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Joppa, MD
Posts: 1,358
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
I do the same as flybouy and I leave the truck idling while I do my checks. I feel this is VITAL to turbo health. Cutting off a hot turbo will "cook the oil" in the bearings and lead to early turbo failure. Every Owner's Manual I've ever read warns to idle the engine after heavy use to allow the turbo to cool down prior to engine shutdown. In fact, some truck brands offer an optional "engine idle program" that allows you to remove the key and the truck will automatically shut down after a specific time elapses.

It just makes sense (to me, anyway) to let the turbo cool down, check the tires, lights and security of hitch and all accessories (awning, slides, bumper, doors, etc) at every stop.
JRTJH I omitted that part of the process but I also let it idle. At rest stops the DW goes potty while I do my walk around. Then I walk the 2 Brittney Spaniels. By that time she returns and I go to the relief station ( we use the camper's, one of the things we liked is the outside bathroom door, easy access ). Then we're back on the road, everyone refreshed!
Edit - forgot to mention but if the road was particularly rough or winding I'll open the front door and have a look see to make sure things are where they belong. Don't want a partially dislodged tv mount or can of beans to become a ping pong ball inside. Maybe it's overkill but I look at it protecting my investment .
__________________

__________________
2012 Laredo 303 TG
2010 F250 LT SCAB long bed 4X4 6.4 Turbo Deisel
flybouy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 01:55 PM   #52
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
About keeping the selling dealer honest about cargo weights at Pre Delivery Inspections (PDI).

My information here is dated from the major Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) rules changes dated 2007.

There is a lot of anecdotal information about RV trailer cargo loads and how they are measured. The safety standards are quite explanatory about cargo and who is responsible for it’s accuracy up until the unit changes hands from the dealer to the consumer. References FMVSS 571.110 & 571.120 are a must read for those most interested. Placards and their locations are described in 49 CFR part 567 (certification). All of those references have brief descriptions about how the numbers are applied.

Probably the most often misquoted information is about propane and batteries. Anything that is installed at the factory is accounted for with the trailer’s Unit Vehicle Weight (UVW) when it leaves the factory. That includes propane systems and the weight of full bottles/storage tanks. All water weight is cargo. If a dealer installs a battery (s) there is no adjustment to the cargo unless the battery (s) weighs more than 100# or they are combined with other equipment (options) that together weigh more than 100#.

When a unit is on display and has had no options added since it left the factory it’s weight information (UVW) should be correct. However, if the dealer has added options, the proper term for the trailer’s weight at that time is Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). Dry weight is a term used before 2007 and would be the same as UVW.

I strongly recommend browsing the references 110 & 120. They give specifics about placard locations and how they are to be modified by the dealers. You don’t have to read the whole document. The cargo info starts at about paragraph S10 in both documents. Just type their basic number (571.120) into your computers search engine. The law document may be easier to read but the government document is official.

So, what has all that to do with tires? Weight, excessive, causes tires to go BOOM.
__________________

__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 09:45 AM   #53
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
RV Trailer Hitch/Tongue weight:

Because the trailer manufacturer publishes a recommended hitch/tongue weight it generates questions about itís validity. Mostly from new owners.

It is a valid recommendation. With extreme care in balancing the trailerís cargo loads, the recommended hitch/tongue weight will work. If it could not be balanced out, the trailer manufacturer wouldnít be allowed to certify the trailer until it was worked-out.

So the recommendation is not hypothetical. Itís just not practical once you get the trailer home and start loading it. Only the owner knows what they are going to carry as cargo for each trip they make and they are sure not going to load to a tongue weight ever time they move the trailer. So, a ballpark figure needs to be established. It comes from experience and how the owner loads the trailer. After a few times at the scales or with your own tongue scale you can get the average tongue weight you carry.

You might ask, why does the trailer manufacturer publish a hitch/tongue weight? Itís a mandatory weight requirement they must use to ensure the GAWR axles have the necessary load capacity to support the trailerís GVWR. In simple terms it goes like this. The published hitch/tongue weight, when added to the trailerís total certified GAWR weight (s) must equal GVWR.
__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2018, 09:49 PM   #54
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
Tire Plant codes:

Not long ago I made a statement about where Carlisle RV trailer tires were manufactured. Some have reported them being built in the USA again. I still haven't found a plant in the USA that builds Carlisle tires.

Today I went to the local boat show where there were numerous boat trailers with Original Equipment Carlisle tires. I checked 14", 15" & 16" plant codes, some were bias ply. All had plant code AQ = CARLISLE TIRE & WHEEL CO. LTD. MEIXIAN, GUANGDONG, CHINA.

If anyone purchases new Carlisle tires with a USA plant code on their sidewalls, please post the code.
__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2018, 05:25 PM   #55
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
RV tires and ďRĒ ratings

The ďRĒ ratings Iím referring to are limiting factors as in GAWR & GVWR. I know, thereís another one, but Iím not going to mention it here.

RV trailer manufacturers, sometimes, just donít pay attention to what their doing. Probably because the folks that design - set the limits - donít talk to the administrators about standards and regulations. Keystone - others too - has had itís shear of recalls for inaccurate vehicle labeling. Most of those recalls have been about weights and tires or both.

The vehicle manufacturer is solely responsible for establishing and setting the ďRĒ factors. Once they decide what their going to build they must set minimum limits mostly based on weakest link factors. The GVWR is the ultimate limiting factor and all other weights and measurements for the trailer must fit into that limited box, so to speak. Once the GVWR has been established and affixed - certification label - to the trailer for delivery to the consumer or dealer it can only be changed or modified by the vehicle manufacturer or a certified vehicle modifier.

Axle manufacturers donít make and certify their axles in all weight ratings trailer manufacturerís may require. So then the vehicle manufacturer has the authority to set their GAWR values to suit the trailerís fitment requirements. Iíve seen keystone set 5200# Dexter axles to a GAWR of 5080# just so they could fit two 2540# max load capacity tires to those axles. Remember, bottom line, tires fitted to RV trailer axles are not required to have any load capacity reserves. RV trailer manufacturerís have always taken advantage of that fact. It might be a moral violation but itís not a legal violation. And, donít rely on the tag on the axle to be a true representation of itís authorized load capacity.

Information in the above paragraph causes a lot of misconception about trailer tire fitments. Some people take the time to read the fitment standards the trailer manufacturer MUST follow and assume the can do likewise. The standards are just what they say they are, builders standards, not at large standards. When the trailer manufacturer affixes the certification label the trailer they have sworn, so to speak, to the DOT, that the trailer meets all minimal safety standards, meaning that their tire fitments are appropriate. The tire industry will not violate that minimal standard and the Original Equipment tire fitments will always be the benchmark for all subsequent replacements. To deviate from the OE tire fitments requires an agreement between the vehicle owner and the trailer manufacturer for optional fitments. Normally, a load range increase within a tireís size designation (ST205/75R14) is not considered ďplus sizingĒ. Itís the same tire with increased load capacity - if available.

Iíve probably mentioned this before but itís worth mentioning again. The fitment for automotive tires, sort of like the ones on your tow vehicle, are governed from the same standard as RV trailer tires but with a twist. They are required to provide load capacity reserves via excess load capacities above the vehicleís GAWRs and set by the vehicle manufacturer. They will normally be fitted to axles that have load capacity reserves above the vehicleís GVWR. Also, provisions have been made via collaborations between vehicle & tire manufacturerís that allow - with adjustments - interchangeability of Passenger and Light Truck tires for many of the vehicles you tow with. There is no such collaborations for any sort of interchangeability between tire designs for RV trailers. That takes us back to vehicle certification and the standards which allow the vehicle manufacturer to fit what they consider appropriate tires, to the vehicle of what ever highway certified tires they see fit to install. Because they did it to model #1 does not allow others to do it to model #2. The benchmark gets in the way.

You will find some statements every now and then about passenger tires not being allowed on RV trailers. Thatís not so. The standards outline the procedure to be used for such fitments.

Oh well, I may have rambled too far. If you got this far and have questions just chime in.
__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2018, 08:00 PM   #56
Hodgy
Senior Member
 
Hodgy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Bragg Creek
Posts: 614
.

CW, had to read that twice. Good bit of information in there.

Thanks . . . . .


.
__________________
2016 Bullet 1800RB, UVW 3260, led by a 2005 Chev Silverado Z-71 1500, Crew Cab, 5.3L, 4WD, Tow & Off Road Package with 4.10 Rear Axle, GVR 7000 lbs, Front GWAR 3925 lbs & Rear GWAR 4000 lbs., Payload 1600 lbs., Hellwig 6012 Air Bags. 97' Honda Goldwing GL1500.
Home Base is the Alberta Foothills at 4300 ' ASL.
Hodgy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2018, 08:45 PM   #57
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
RV Trailer Wheels - Rim Sizes - Load Capacities

According to FMVSS, the wheels provided as Original Equipment on your trailer were approve by the tire manufacturer for such fitments. In fact, every tire manufacturer must provide retailers/OEM providers with a listing of wheel/rim sizes acceptable for fitment for every tire size the manufacturer provides for wholesale/retail sales.

Wheels for RV trailers must have a zero offset.

OE wheel fitments must provide a load capacity equal to or greater than the GAWR axle (s) maximum load capacities listed on the trailerís certification label.

Wheel PSI limits are determined by the PSI capacity of the valve stem. In other words, a wheel with a 2830# load capacity must have a valve stem rated at 65 PSI or higher. The wheelís certified load capacity is itís ultimate load carrying limit.

Tire manufacturers build tires to fit specific wheel/rim sizes. They may build them with an acceptable width range for fitment purposes, such as 5.5Ē - 7.0ď. They will normally determine a measuring size to use for tire specifications when fitted to that size, in this case maybe 6Ē, then all specifications for the tire will be consistent with the measuring rim size. Sometimes tires are unique in bead construction as in steel cased tires. Such tires may have a single rim width. That width is critical for proper tire fitment to the wheel rim. Some tire manufacturers will list a single rim width on the tireís sidewall to assist the tire installer in selecting the proper wheel/rim size.

The big problem for RV trailer axles and the wheels & tires fitted to them is overloading. The trailer may scale out at or under GVWR but the axles may have an overweight problem. The problem is normally from a severely unbalanced condition that causes the axles to be carrying a combined load within their capacity but not evenly. One end may be 300#-400# heavier than the other end. The tire and wheel in that overloaded condition have a higher probability factor for failure.
__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2018, 07:40 PM   #58
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
RVIA Recommendations

This has nothing to do with official regulatory standards. It is a huge organization making a stance for more reserve load capacity provisions for original tire fitments to RV trailers.

https://www.moderntiredealer.com/art...adial-st-tires
__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 08:38 PM   #59
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
Steel Cased Carlisle Trailer Tires

About 15 years ago Goodyear introduced a - what I call - hybrid 16" trailer tire known as the G614. It had a LT prefix and was dubbed RST for Regional Service Trailer. It had/has a maximum load capacity of 3750# @ 110 PSI.

Not long after the G614 became a very successful replacement tire, the "off shore" tire manufacturer's jumped on-board and started building their brand that mimicked the G614.

With RV trailers getting larger & larger the "off shore" people developed newer ST designs with load capacities suited for the 7000# & 8000# axles on the largest RV trailers.

Not to be outdone, Carlisle has now introduced their 16" LRG all steel tire line-up with the two most popular sizes.

https://www.carlislebrandtires.com/o...-detail/csl-16

I'm not plugging the brand, I have never used Carlisle tires on my RV trailer. However, Carlisle is popular with many on this forum so I've posted their info in the reference above.

Looking back, you'll find that Carlisle was one of the first trailer tire builders that foresaw the need for more load capacity for the 6500# - 7000# axles and developed 16" LRE & LRF ST tire sizes to meet the needs. Their ST235/85R16E has a load capacity of 3640# @ 80 PSI and the same tire in a LRF has a 3960# load capacity @ 95 PSI.

For a long time Carlisle recommended a speed limit of 60 MPH for their trailer tire line-up. Today, all of their Radial trailer tires are rated at 75 MPH or higher.
__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2018, 08:52 AM   #60
CWtheMan
Senior Member
 
CWtheMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 1,244
Greenball 15" ASC trailer tire.

Greenball has added a 15" steel cased trailer tire to it's line-up. See the reference below.

http://www.greenball.com/catalog/All...nstruction.pdf
__________________

__________________
An Old Navy Aircraft Mechanic that writes about tires.
Our rig. NC mountain pull-off. US-19.
http://www.irv2.com/photopost/showfull.php?photo=35007
CWtheMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tires

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Keystone RV Company or any of its affiliates in any way. Keystone RVģ is a registered trademark of the Keystone RV Company.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.