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Old 10-20-2013, 05:45 PM   #1
coop
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Condensation

We had our first late season camping trip in our Cougar 21RBS, took the grand daughters along, had a great time, although it was cold outside for the entire weekend. I noticed something though and wondered if anyone else has seen this and if they had a solution. We had to run the furnace for the whole trip and we found condensation in a couple of places. The end of the mattress was damp where it was against the wall, we pulled it away from the wall and that seemed to help. The other was on the floor at the base of the cabinet and sink there was a bead of water. First thing I did was check the pipes for leaks, but all was dry. Inside the cabinet was considerably colder than the rest of the TT.
I thought about adding insulation under the sink and behind the cabinet, but thought I would try to get other idea's.
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Old 10-20-2013, 06:56 PM   #2
ktmracer
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our solution in the winter is to run a portable dehumidifier. If not, keep some vents open, make SURE the ceiling vent/fan is on when showering.

Our portable dehumidifier will usually draw out about 6 gallons the first day. Need to empty it before bedtime, and will be full again in the morning. Then it will usually run 24 hours before filling up again. (3 gallons)
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Old 10-20-2013, 07:08 PM   #3
hankaye
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coop, Howdy;

As a fulltimer I have an ongoing battle with humidity.
How I attempt to stay ahead of the drips is I leave the
o/h vents cracked 1/4 to 1/2 inch, I keep all my cabinet's
doors cracked open to balance the temps. through the entire
RV, I also keep my thermostat set for about 68*F. I'm lucky that
where I live the average humidity is below 30% usually closer to
10% or less. The only living beings in here are myself and my pooch.
So far so good...

hankaye
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Old 10-21-2013, 01:30 PM   #4
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x3 on keeping vents and windows cracked. We also bought one of these to help dry the air out.http://www.campingworld.com/shopping...c-heater/27289
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Old 10-22-2013, 08:52 AM   #5
coop
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I appreciate the imput, sounds like the best soluting is keeping the TT ventelated and trying to keep the temp even through-out the camper. I wonder if there would be an advantage to putting vents in the cabnets and closets. Just a thought.

Thanks
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Old 10-22-2013, 10:58 AM   #6
Festus2
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I think you will gain more advantage by leaving the cupboard and closet doors open slightly so to allow any "warmer" air to find its way into the interior of those compartments. Cutting out vent holes and installing vents is a major undertaking and really not necessary IMHO.
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:27 AM   #7
Justvisiting2day
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Condensation

Quote:
Originally Posted by coop View Post
I appreciate the imput, sounds like the best soluting is keeping the TT ventelated and trying to keep the temp even through-out the camper. I wonder if there would be an advantage to putting vents in the cabnets and closets. Just a thought.

Thanks
Hey coop, I have installed 2" vents, from under the pump areas up to the clothes racks and installed vents through out . Also keeping the doors open as much as possible is a great help. In the cold time , we store close to the house so we have a small elect heater that keeps the temps good and dry. And we keep the bath fan running to circulate the air.
Dryness is good.

Cheers
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Old 12-02-2013, 06:18 PM   #8
leoniepetersen
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Hello. I am really interested in whether your dehumidifier is able to run without power? We live in New Zealand and travel throughout all seasons and freedom camp most of the time. Some climates are very humid others drier even in winter however have had copious amounts of moisture especially in cupboards/wardrobes. we have tried all the other fixes like vents open doors/cupboards open to air. we even get condensation on the walls at night. Although insulated, it seems to start where the aluminium frame supports the trailer, then runs down the walls. I don't use the stove top for boiling and we always have fan on in the shower room. Towels are dried outside etc. Hopefully your dehumidifier might work.
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Old 12-02-2013, 07:22 PM   #9
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Any portable dehumidifier that I have seen all require 110VAC. Haier and Eva-Dry (EDV-2200) are two products which our members have reported using with success.
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Old 12-02-2013, 07:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Festus2 View Post
Any portable dehumidifier that I have seen all require 110VAC. Haier and Eva-Dry (EDV-2200) are two products which our members have reported using with success.
there are some 12v dehumidifiers, but IMHO not worth the effort. they are rated at maybe a pint in 24hrs, while the 120V units will dump out 32pints in 8 hours. and that's what you need.

But the 120V units draw about 1A (120VA) so not too useable w/o 120V power.

BTW we hav a haier and it is fantastic at keeping the humdity under control in the winter at the oregon coast.
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