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Old 12-02-2018, 08:49 AM   #41
Dave W
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Ford regen cycle is sometimes frustrating when it comes on a half mile from home - which it seems to do on a regular basis. To me it means that to clear that function I need to go around the block which in my case, is a 7-10 mile loop depending on my time.

That EGR cooler/filter is a 300 buck item that will throw a P0403 fault code when it starts to reduce the EGR gas flow by carboning up. So far I've been able to clear mine via a ScanGauge function and by using an extra dose of Power Sevice Diesel Kleen. That cooler/filter can be manually cleaned with about a 2-3 hour underhood 'experience' and a 60 buck set of gaskets instead of a replacement. There are some You Tube videos that show you how it's done.

No, again, I'll not be deleting the emissions on my truck. The payback time and cost way exceeds any positives. Then there is that fact that NY State uses the CA. CARB arrangement. While a diesel picup is currently excluded from a full emissions inspection, hints are being dropped to add them in the future and the cost of a jug of Walmart DEF is still less then 10 bucks about every 3000 miles (towing is about half that bobtail miles)
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:45 AM   #42
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EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM

Diesel Exhaust System: Oxidation Catalyst And Diesel Particulate Filter System (If Equipped) Your vehicle is equipped with a diesel particulate filter. The diesel particulate filter is an inline filter in the exhaust system that reduces carbon emissions by trapping exhaust particles before they reach the tailpipe. The diesel particulate filter looks similar to a traditional exhaust catalyst, except larger, and is part of the exhaust system under the vehicle. The filter couples to a diesel oxidation catalyst that reduces the amount of harmful exhaust emitted from the tailpipe. As soot gathers in the system, it begins to restrict the filter. You need to periodically clean the soot that gathers inside the filter. You can clean the soot in two different ways, passive regeneration and active regeneration. Both methods occur automatically and require no actions from the driver. During either one of these regeneration methods, you may notice a change in exhaust tone. At certain times, the information display will display various messages related to the diesel particulate filter. See the Information Displays chapter in the Owner Guide for more information. Passive regeneration In passive regeneration, the exhaust system temperature and constituents automatically clean the filter, or reduce the soot level, by burning (oxidizing) the soot. Cleaning occurs naturally because of normal engine operating conditions (at varying levels, due to driving patterns).

Diesel particulate filter maintenance

You must properly maintain your diesel particulate filter in order for it to function properly. Do not disregard the EXHAUST OVERLOADED DRIVE TO CLEAN and EXHAUST AT LIMIT DRIVE TO CLEAN NOW maintenance messages otherwise system damage could result that your warranty may not cover. Failure to perform active or Operator Commanded Regeneration when instructed could result in a clogged diesel particulate filter. If your diesel particulate filter fills beyond the regeneration threshold, your vehicle will disable the ability for active and Operator Commanded Regeneration. This could result in irreversible damage to the filter requiring replacement that your warranty may not cover. If your vehicle is not equipped with Operator Commanded Regeneration, check with your dealer for availability. Once the diesel particulate filter is full of exhaust particles, the engine control module will command the exhaust system to clean the filter through a process called active regeneration. Active regeneration requires the engine computer to raise the exhaust temperature to eliminate the particles. During cleaning, the particles convert to harmless gasses. Once cleaned the diesel particulate filter will then be ready to continue trapping exhaust particles. The regeneration process operates more efficiently when you safely operate your vehicle at least 30 mph (48 km/h) with a steady pedal for approximately 20 minutes to complete the process. The frequency and duration of regeneration will fluctuate by how you drive your vehicle, outside air temperature, and altitude. For most driving, regeneration frequency will vary from 100- 500 miles (161 - 805 km) between occurrences and each occurrence will last from 9 - 20 minutes. You can usually reduce the duration of regeneration if you maintain a constant speed above 30 mph (48 km/h). When the engine control module detects that the diesel particulate filter is nearly full of particulates and you are not operating your in a manner to allow effective automatic cleaning, the information display will display EXH OVERLOADED DRIVE TO CLEAN for base information display and Exhaust Overloaded Drive to Clean for the optional information display. These messages appear as a reminder for you to drive in order to clean the diesel particulate filter. If you operate your vehicle in a manner to allow effective automatic cleaning, the information display will display a cleaning exhaust filter message, which is the normal regeneration process. See the Information Displays chapter of the Owner Guide for more information. You can also choose Operator Commanded Regeneration to clean the exhaust system at this point. See How to start Operator Commanded Regeneration later in this chapter. If you are not able to drive in a manner that allows effective automatic cleaning (active regeneration) or you choose to perform regeneration of the diesel particulate filter (cleaning) while at idle (stationary), then Operator Commanded Regeneration would need to be performed. See Operator Commanded Regeneration later in this chapter.



Mine flashes a momentary message "Cleaning Exhaust" when beginning the passive cycle...

But... when the DRIVE TO CLEAN message comes on it will stay until it finishes or you cut the motor off...
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:05 PM   #43
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[QUOTE=Javi;317424]My '15 has all that, but when I cut it off too many times it will give me a message of DRIVE TO CLEAN EXHAUST FILTER which does not disappear until the cycle is finished.

Yea mine did that 2 or 3 times before it would not clean by driving any longer. I may have just had a bad system since I always drove for at least 20 minutes when the passive message flashed (if I caught it). And yes I have read the supplemental manual several times (including the day I purchased the truck) to see if I was doing something wrong.
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Old 12-03-2018, 05:28 AM   #44
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[QUOTE=Old Mustanger;317539]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javi View Post
My '15 has all that, but when I cut it off too many times it will give me a message of DRIVE TO CLEAN EXHAUST FILTER which does not disappear until the cycle is finished.

Yea mine did that 2 or 3 times before it would not clean by driving any longer. I may have just had a bad system since I always drove for at least 20 minutes when the passive message flashed (if I caught it). And yes I have read the supplemental manual several times (including the day I purchased the truck) to see if I was doing something wrong.
You very well could have gotten a bad DPF, I know that I have only seen the DRIVE TO CLEAN warning twice in the 4 years I've owned this truck and about that in the '12 I had before it.. I do frequently see the flash warning that the truck is passively cleaning the filter, especially if I haven't made a road trip in a couple of weeks..

One thing that I'm religious about is running a lubricant and Cetane booster... I use Diesel Kleen, my tank is a 37 gallon and I use 16 oz per fill-up..
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Old 12-04-2018, 12:05 PM   #45
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I just sold my 05 Silverado that I owned for 7.5 years. (Need to Update my Signature) It was a great truck. I had it deleted and tuned for most of the time I owned it. Just bought a 16 and while it's under warranty will not touch it. Once its over I'm gong to delete it.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:04 AM   #46
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What is frustrating is how the US OEM’s stick with the goofy setup they force down our throats. There are far better solutions that are more efficient and reduce complexity which also decreases maintenance and downtime.

Amminex has long had a great emissions solution ready to drop in to a diesel vehicle from cars on up thru Class 8 trucks, equipment, even locomotives.

It uses a 100% urea in a solid substrate. Urea is fed to SCR in a gaseous form, eliminating need for DEF injector and filter. And since fully functional at engine startup, eliminates need for EGR and associated nonsense on the motor. This causes less soot to be created thereby decreasing regen events and increasing DPF life cycle. All this while delivering lower emissions than current systems.

The Urea tanks are changed out just like a forklift operator changes propane tanks. The OEM can spec size of tanks to match lube service intervals. Tanks are recycled and recharged with urea. None of the messy DEF issues and none of the shelf life problems with DEF. a charged container can be stored for 5 years.

So when the US OEM’s finally pull their heads out of their back side, then I will consider one of their new diesels.
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:18 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by Mad Cow View Post
What is frustrating is how the US OEM’s stick with the goofy setup they force down our throats. There are far better solutions that are more efficient and reduce complexity which also decreases maintenance and downtime.

Amminex has long had a great emissions solution ready to drop in to a diesel vehicle from cars on up thru Class 8 trucks, equipment, even locomotives.

It uses a 100% urea in a solid substrate. Urea is fed to SCR in a gaseous form, eliminating need for DEF injector and filter. And since fully functional at engine startup, eliminates need for EGR and associated nonsense on the motor. This causes less soot to be created thereby decreasing regen events and increasing DPF life cycle. All this while delivering lower emissions than current systems.

The Urea tanks are changed out just like a forklift operator changes propane tanks. The OEM can spec size of tanks to match lube service intervals. Tanks are recycled and recharged with urea. None of the messy DEF issues and none of the shelf life problems with DEF. a charged container can be stored for 5 years.

So when the US OEM’s finally pull their heads out of their back side, then I will consider one of their new diesels.
Two questions: What is the cost of that system for a 3/4-1 ton truck? How much does it cost to maintain (change out urea cannisters, etc) such a system when compared to current technology?
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:49 AM   #48
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Two questions: What is the cost of that system for a 3/4-1 ton truck? How much does it cost to maintain (change out urea cannisters, etc) such a system when compared to current technology?
No clue. It would be something the OEM would do as part of the vehicle build. There is a lot of information including videos at http://www.amminex.com/
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Old 12-06-2018, 11:47 AM   #49
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No clue. It would be something the OEM would do as part of the vehicle build. There is a lot of information including videos at http://www.amminex.com/
The my guess would be that someone "INDUSTRY WIDE" (not at Ford, GM or Chrysler) made the decision that trucks already cost $60K+ and the industry couldn't add more money for a "premium exhaust regeneration system" at this time.

Just as light VFR rated airplanes don't come standard with radar and full instrumentation (adding those would make the cost even more expensive), the automobile industry has determined that sales would drop if the cost of a more expensive (even if it's also more effective) emissions system were forced on the public.

Us "buyers" are picky on how much increase we'll accept from year to year. Imagine if the cost of a Chevy Impala ($2300 in 1962) would have jumped to $60,000 in 1963. How many do you think GM would have sold???

"Better" is a compromise between affordability, reliability and effectiveness. If the balance isn't maintained, the system fails.

That may be why you don't see the system you discussed as OEM on any light duty truck being sold to the public. Then again, maybe the industry knows more about potential limitations of the system, limitations that weren't identified in the articles you referenced ???

Just thinking out loud, I'm not willing to add $5000 to the MSRP of my truck, $68,000 was enough !!!!!
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Old 12-06-2018, 12:27 PM   #50
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The bottom line is the manufacturers bottom line. They will install/build what helps sell the product. Most consumers don't ask where the bearings are made, what the Rockwell number is on the springs, etc. But they will set behind the wheel and get to drooling over the newest bluetooth flatulent detector that automatically rolls down the window. JMHO
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