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Old 07-19-2018, 01:20 PM   #11
cavediver
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I'm repairing a trailer that I let the maintenance go. All sandwiched sides and floor. Not fun in the heat we are having. Keep up on your roof, and other seals.

Jack
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Old 07-19-2018, 02:39 PM   #12
JRTJH
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Wood vs aluminum framing is not "inferior/superior" but is "different" with each having significant advantages and disadvantages. It's the same with solid floor vs sandwich floor construction. Each has advantages and each has some significant disadvantages. Typically, aluminum construction is more expensive and wood framing tends to be focused in the entry level offerings from all manufacturers.

If you go back 75 years, you'll find that all travel trailers were wood frame construction. Along came Airstream and changed that. But, the aluminum framing in todays "square wall trailers" is not the same as Airstream's construction. Today's aluminum framed trailers typically use vacuum bonded fiberglass/luan/Styrofoam/luan construction with the aluminum sidewall "stuck in the middle". If anything happens like an accident, delamination, or problems with the adhesive bond, it becomes a major issue. Advantages: More durable (usually) less maintenance, not as likely to dent as aluminum siding.

It's the same with floors. Solid floors are more "sturdy" when walking on them. They tend to hold up to water seepage better (6 months vs 6 weeks before it shows up) while the sandwich floors tend to be lighter. However, sandwich flooring is not as sturdy when walking on it, is more involved to repair, but seems to have better insulation qualities than solid floors with fiberglass beneath the wood. Once the fiberglass gets wet, it doesn't insulate very well.

It's not really a matter of "better or worse" or "inferior/superior" and it really isn't a matter of "durable/not durable". Typically, wood frame trailers are a bit heavier and not quite as "option filled". That is a matter of marketing, not durability. Sort of like adding lipstick to a pig.... Dress it up, it looks better than before, but underneath, it's still a pig (or a wood frame trailer).... Some people would kill for bacon, some feel very positive for/against wood frame trailers.....

It really boils down to what you want, what you can afford, what your tow vehicle can handle. There are some very nice wood frame trailers and there is some JUNK with aluminum sidewalls, so consider your choices and migrate toward what fits your needs. Good Luck !!!!!
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Old 07-19-2018, 03:31 PM   #13
compeakw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
Wood vs aluminum framing is not "inferior/superior" but is "different" with each having significant advantages and disadvantages. It's the same with solid floor vs sandwich floor construction. Each has advantages and each has some significant disadvantages. Typically, aluminum construction is more expensive and wood framing tends to be focused in the entry level offerings from all manufacturers.

If you go back 75 years, you'll find that all travel trailers were wood frame construction. Along came Airstream and changed that. But, the aluminum framing in todays "square wall trailers" is not the same as Airstream's construction. Today's aluminum framed trailers typically use vacuum bonded fiberglass/luan/Styrofoam/luan construction with the aluminum sidewall "stuck in the middle". If anything happens like an accident, delamination, or problems with the adhesive bond, it becomes a major issue. Advantages: More durable (usually) less maintenance, not as likely to dent as aluminum siding.

It's the same with floors. Solid floors are more "sturdy" when walking on them. They tend to hold up to water seepage better (6 months vs 6 weeks before it shows up) while the sandwich floors tend to be lighter. However, sandwich flooring is not as sturdy when walking on it, is more involved to repair, but seems to have better insulation qualities than solid floors with fiberglass beneath the wood. Once the fiberglass gets wet, it doesn't insulate very well.

It's not really a matter of "better or worse" or "inferior/superior" and it really isn't a matter of "durable/not durable". Typically, wood frame trailers are a bit heavier and not quite as "option filled". That is a matter of marketing, not durability. Sort of like adding lipstick to a pig.... Dress it up, it looks better than before, but underneath, it's still a pig (or a wood frame trailer).... Some people would kill for bacon, some feel very positive for/against wood frame trailers.....

It really boils down to what you want, what you can afford, what your tow vehicle can handle. There are some very nice wood frame trailers and there is some JUNK with aluminum sidewalls, so consider your choices and migrate toward what fits your needs. Good Luck !!!!!
Well said!
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