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Old 10-06-2018, 08:52 AM   #21
Miles65
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The more I get into the logistics and cost of this driveway installation, the less I'm inclined to go for it. That being the case. let me ask another question, here: Since the only part of the run where I lose traction, in the mud, is the last 50' of the back-up, do you think I can simply put tire chains on one of my trucks and make a go of it? The incline is probably about 10. I would tow my RV to a campsite with my nice, new F-150, then, on my return, drop it in the street, hook up my Ram 2500 Diesel, with chains on the rear tires, and back it in. Yeah, lots of hassle, to be sure, but it will save me a bundle of cash and mega-hours of driveway work. Weigh in, if you feel like it. Thanks! (I don't like using my 2500 for vacations since it's my work truck, and looks it. I also wouldn't want to drive all over the place with chains. That being the case, I'd install the chains on the 2500 before I left for camping, so it'd be ready when I got back, if I needed it.)
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:44 AM   #22
66joej
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The more I get into the logistics and cost of this driveway installation, the less I'm inclined to go for it. That being the case. let me ask another question, here: Since the only part of the run where I lose traction, in the mud, is the last 50' of the back-up, do you think I can simply put tire chains on one of my trucks and make a go of it? The incline is probably about 10. I would tow my RV to a campsite with my nice, new F-150, then, on my return, drop it in the street, hook up my Ram 2500 Diesel, with chains on the rear tires, and back it in. Yeah, lots of hassle, to be sure, but it will save me a bundle of cash and mega-hours of driveway work. Weigh in, if you feel like it. Thanks! (I don't like using my 2500 for vacations since it's my work truck, and looks it. I also wouldn't want to drive all over the place with chains. That being the case, I'd install the chains on the 2500 before I left for camping, so it'd be ready when I got back, if I needed it.)
I think the method you are describing would get old real fast. Building the driveway is more expensive now but in the long run you will appreciate the convenience.
Is the Ram not a 4x4? No need for chains if it is.
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:57 AM   #23
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I think the method you are describing would get old real fast. Building the driveway is more expensive now but in the long run you will appreciate the convenience.
Is the Ram not a 4x4? No need for chains if it is.

I agree with Joe. For a one time thing that might be OK but if that is the plan for every time you use the trailer it will be extremely annoying IMO. Can a dump truck get into that 50' that is problematic? We have the gravel road to our house in the mountains re-graveled periodically and it's not too expensive to have them come in and just drop/spread it with the truck - I usually like to get about 4" down. The larger gravel (1" +) just moves around and won't pack but the smaller gravel with chat in it compacts and gets hard. I don't know what a dirt/gravel contractor would charge in your area but I think (been a while and poor memory) we pay about $300 a truck load. They just drive up, start at one end and slowly open/lift the bed. Wider areas require a 2nd pass. If needed, we spread/level with rakes. I would far, far rather do that than place/remove snow chains for a small muddy area. Plus, after a few rounds through the mud spinning those chains they will have to come out and repair the holes/ruts with something anyway. JMO
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:59 AM   #24
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I agree with Joe. For a one time thing that might be OK but if that is the plan for every time you use the trailer it will be extremely annoying IMO. Can a dump truck get into that 50' that is problematic? We have the gravel road to our house in the mountains re-graveled periodically and it's not too expensive to have them come in and just drop/spread it with the truck - I usually like to get about 4" down. The larger gravel (1" +) just moves around and won't pack but the smaller gravel with chat in it compacts and gets hard. I don't know what a dirt/gravel contractor would charge in your area but I think (been a while and poor memory) we pay about $300 a truck load. They just drive up, start at one end and slowly open/lift the bed. Wider areas require a 2nd pass. If needed, we spread/level with rakes. I would far, far rather do that than place/remove snow chains for a small muddy area. Plus, after a few rounds through the mud spinning those chains they will have to come out and repair the holes/ruts with something anyway. JMO
I have to agree with sourdough
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Old 10-06-2018, 11:12 AM   #25
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I think the method you are describing would get old real fast. Building the driveway is more expensive now but in the long run you will appreciate the convenience.
Is the Ram not a 4x4? No need for chains if it is.
No, not 4x4. I needed the higher towing capacity of the rear-wheel drive. I haul 12K with it, at times. It hates the mud, though.
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Old 10-06-2018, 02:30 PM   #26
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Let's look at the "whole picture" not just the drive or pulling through the mud.

First, there's the PVC frame on a 15'+ tall structure that's covered with a tarp. That may (or may not) survive the "winter winds" and the "summer sun". If it were me, I'd not install a $1000 drive to a $1000 building until I knew the building is going to survive the weather.

So, this is just a suggestion, but something to consider. You're concerned with pulling the trailer through the wet grass/mud. That happens only a short while, otherwise, there's no real problem with getting the trailer in and out.

Putting chains on a truck and hitching to a 4 ton trailer to pull it through the mud is going to make a "helluva" mess in the back yard. You are assured of having ruts at least a foot deep, provided you can even pull through the ruts.

I'd look at the weather forecast, and if you're expecting to use the trailer and rain is coming, I'd pull it out before the mud starts and park it somewhere you CAN get it out. Then, when the mud dries, put it back in the building.

Then, if in a year or so, the building is working as planned, that's the time to start building an expensive rock drive. If you invest in the gravel/limestone/granite now and find the building doesn't work as hoped, you're stuck with a lot of "stuff the lawn mower doesn't like".....

I'd slow down a bit and look at alternatives to the gravel drive for this year, then see if it's really needed once you know the building is going to still be there, "next year"......
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Old 10-06-2018, 02:48 PM   #27
Miles65
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Let's look at the "whole picture" not just the drive or pulling through the mud.

First, there's the PVC frame on a 15'+ tall structure that's covered with a tarp. That may (or may not) survive the "winter winds" and the "summer sun". If it were me, I'd not install a $1000 drive to a $1000 building until I knew the building is going to survive the weather.

So, this is just a suggestion, but something to consider. You're concerned with pulling the trailer through the wet grass/mud. That happens only a short while, otherwise, there's no real problem with getting the trailer in and out.

Putting chains on a truck and hitching to a 4 ton trailer to pull it through the mud is going to make a "helluva" mess in the back yard. You are assured of having ruts at least a foot deep, provided you can even pull through the ruts.

I'd look at the weather forecast, and if you're expecting to use the trailer and rain is coming, I'd pull it out before the mud starts and park it somewhere you CAN get it out. Then, when the mud dries, put it back in the building.

Then, if in a year or so, the building is working as planned, that's the time to start building an expensive rock drive. If you invest in the gravel/limestone/granite now and find the building doesn't work as hoped, you're stuck with a lot of "stuff the lawn mower doesn't like".....

I'd slow down a bit and look at alternatives to the gravel drive for this year, then see if it's really needed once you know the building is going to still be there, "next year"......
I agree with you. I'm just jonesing to get into another project. I am going to give it a break, for now.
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Old 10-07-2018, 04:00 AM   #28
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I agree with you. I'm just jonesing to get into another project. I am going to give it a break, for now.

If you want projects to do come to my place I can find lots of things for you to do. LOL

Really though good luck with your driveway project.
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Old 10-11-2018, 07:58 AM   #29
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If the last 50 feet is the problem, why put in a 120' driveway? Start with the 50' at a third of the cost and add on as needed.
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Old 10-11-2018, 08:27 AM   #30
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With years of experience in building roads I would suggest the following
1. Work in dry weather if possible
2. Excavate a minimum of 6 for the drive way, preferably 8. More is better.
3. Compact sub grade with vibratory tamper or small roller.
4. Apply fabric on sub grade, staple in place.
5. If possible find a local source for crushed concrete (usually construction companies that do road work) and place in two lifts compacting each with the vibratory tamper.

I suggest the crushed concrete as in my experience it packs in and sets better than most stone. If you want to try to keep your lawn I have actually used this method excavating an extra 4 then covering the area with more filter fabric and placing top soil over the stone to grade then seeding. That way you have a green driveway.
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