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Old 08-13-2019, 09:34 AM   #11
JRTJH
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Originally Posted by wiredgeorge View Post
The 30/20 breaker is on the way. Found the power inlet on etrailer.com if anyone is interested at:
https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/...20-amp_55-8987

There is a 15A and 20A version. Probably will buy the 20A as it is basically the same price as the 15A. Will wire direct to the 20A microwave breaker using 12ga Romex. Hope we can then use our microwave while not having to shut off A/C.
That PPL link lists the 20 amp Marinco inlet for $28.99 + 9.99 shipping Total $38.98. Amazon has the same Marinco 20 amp inlet for $22.59 with free 2 day PRIME shipping (if you're a PRIME member). https://www.amazon.com/ParkPower-Mar...ay&sr=8-6&th=1 Might save a couple bucks that way ???
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Old 08-13-2019, 12:31 PM   #12
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Problem with buying this sort of thing (Marinco inlet) is that search doesn't turn up stuff as you would like. I tried a number of things on Amazon and couldn't find it. I found the one you pictured on etrailer.com and used its description to find it on eBay where I bought one (not etrailer) due to cost. $22.63 with free shipping; I am not an Amazon prime member so would have ended up likely having to buy something I didn't really want or need to make it to the magical $25 minimum for free shipping by Amazon.

Sadly, as a motorcycle mechanic, my multimeters are limited to $6 units from Harbor Freight and good for voltage and resistance but not AC current. I really don't need to go farther in this direction if my new 30/20 breaker is works out and the Marinco inlet keeps the microwave happy. If not, I will head to HF and get a $10 multimeter that can measure current and start doing more investigating. Still don't know how anyone could use an EMS to measure current on circuits downstream from the breaker. Just curious in that regard.
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Old 08-13-2019, 12:41 PM   #13
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Our EMS has an "current amperage" readout that displays on the LED status window. So, for us (and most people who have a Progressive EMS) all you have to do to determine "current amp load" is isolate that breaker by turning all the others OFF and look at the amp load on the EMS display.

This is much easier than trying to use a multimeter or ammeter to do the same thing.
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Old 08-13-2019, 02:22 PM   #14
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Never thought of that! Good tip and many thanks.
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Old 08-13-2019, 05:17 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wiredgeorge View Post
Sadly, as a motorcycle mechanic, my multimeters are limited to $6 units from Harbor Freight and good for voltage and resistance but not AC current... I will head to HF and get a $10 multimeter that can measure current and start doing more investigating.
If you can squeeze $15, here's what you really want. Trying to test current with a probe-type meter is an ethnic fire drill. This way you don't have to disconnect stuff just to measure it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wiredgeorge View Post
Still don't know how anyone could use an EMS to measure current on circuits downstream from the breaker. Just curious in that regard.
You just turn every circuit breaker off except the one you want to meter, then run whatever is on it and read the EMS current display.
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Old 08-18-2019, 01:17 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRTJH View Post
Our EMS has an "current amperage" readout that displays on the LED status window. So, for us (and most people who have a Progressive EMS) all you have to do to determine "current amp load" is isolate that breaker by turning all the others OFF and look at the amp load on the EMS display.

This is much easier than trying to use a multimeter or ammeter to do the same thing.
Surge Guard also has a unit (34951) that can be used with a remote monitor (40301) that displays current, watts, voltage, and frequency.

Whichever monitor and method you use, remember that current flow is in part a function of supply voltage available. If the supply voltage drops under heavy load, the current flow will increase for most loads. So, if you have a shore power supply with under-sized wiring, it is quite possible to see the voltage drop significantly during heavy use. (We had an old 30A supply at the house that would drop voltage 10-15% when under heavy load.)

The "one-at-a-time" ON method provides general guidance. At the end of the test turn on as much equipment as your supply will support and make sure that the voltage doesn't drop significantly (e.g. 120 to 105). If it does, then consider a "one-at-a-time" OFF test to see the impact of current on a heavily loaded system.

Your EMS will kick off at some low voltage - the Surge Guard referenced above will open (shut off power) at 102 Volts. A load of 30A @ 120V = 3600 Watts. That same load in watts @ 103 volts will pull 35 Amps and trip your breakers. This is a case where you might find breakers popping in your trailer or at the pedestal with no apparent problem listed on your EMS. So, in running your tests, pay attention to the voltage as well as the current. [One of the reasons I really like the Surge Guard - provides KiloWatt readings on the remote monitor.]

You might find this issue in older parks or parks where the service was under-designed or poorly maintained [or in my back yard if connected to the old swimming pool wiring]. And the presence of a lot of "neighbors" on the same service in an RV park will only make matters worse.

Just something else to consider...
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