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Old 11-08-2019, 06:45 AM   #41
LewisB
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Originally Posted by TJH View Post
I’m having mixed feelings. The majority of our trailering is 3 to 5 night trips within a 75 mile radius. Occasionally from central Oregon to the coast, just under 200 miles away. We bought both used and have been towing/camping with these for 3 years and the combination has been performing well together. (I upgraded the tires to light truck tires vs the passenger tires the F150s come with.). I could reduce the tongue weight and hitch transfer amount by not putting anything in the bed, and placing more in the rear of the trailer, including start using the slide out rack on the back of the trailer.
Does anyone have guesses as to what the “weakest link” in the GVWR may be? Any other relatively simple things that can be done to improve the situation? Or are there other threads where this is discussed?

I didn’t mean to overtake this string direction. Thanks for the help.
I'm with flybouy Marshall - According to Progressive Insurance, 77% of most vehicle accidents occur within 15 miles of the driver's home. While the numbers might be different and likely lower for RV's, the point is that your distance from home is meaningless when you get passed by that 18 wheeler travelling 20 mph faster than you.

Taking weight out of the bed of your truck (removing cargo) might help meet your tow vehicle gross weight limitations but does NOT change your hitch weight (which is also part of the cargo weight) unless you move that weight to aft of the trailer axles.

Keep in mind that "Reducing the tongue weight" is a two-edged sword. Yes, you can change this dynamic with loading. Manufacturers attempt to do this by moving the axles forward; ever see a 30' trailer with the axles centered on the trailer?. This is an attempt to reduce the tongue weight, making the trailer more "towable" by lighter duty vehicles with limited hitch capabilities. However, reducing the tongue weight also leads to a higher level of instability from wind, wheel alignment issues, road ruts, etc. Carry this thought out to the extreme - load your trailer so that it has "zero" tongue weight - how well is is going to tow in a wind storm. Remember, if you drive on a freeway or road with 18 wheelers, you are ALWAYS in a wind storm - worse yet, think unsuspected and "gusty" wind storm.

So in answer to your search for "simple" solutions, there aren't many. Maybe reduce your expectations for what you can tow and what you need when you do tow. Budget for future expansion of your hardware. Most importantly - keep an open mind. The fact that you are thinking this over, exploring for information, wanting to do right - all great signs that you are on the right track? Keep after it!
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:44 AM   #42
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The weakest link is your present tow vehicle, too little truck with too much rv.!
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:59 AM   #43
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Your not going to like this as it's my opinion so don't be offended.

The first sentence I highlighted is you rationalizing why towing overloaded is ok. I think most folks on here have BTDTGTS. I,m included in that crowd. I was doing the same thing. Came to this forum and several people pointed it out. It's only natural that someone becomes defensive about their decisions and think that the folks telling you differently are just a bunch of "knuckle draggers" that think they are more "manly" for driving larger trucks.

Nothing could be further from the truth. I had my epiphany about 200 miles from home crossing the top of a mountain while passing an 18 wheeler. Thankfully I had cleared the truck (which started the sway) when the wind passing thru the cut in the mountain took over. I consider myself an excellent driver but that experience was unlike ANY other. Thankfully it was a multilane lane highway with shoulders as I used every inch of space between the guide rails. I was ignorant to the potential of the rig in a bad situation and never wanted to repeat that exercise again.


In all honesty the 'weakest link" is you. This isn't a personal attack, just an observation. It's humane nature that we don't want to face reality that we think we can correct the condition by applying "add ons". After all, many stores/websites sell all kinds of "fixes" right? I also realize the delima many face in the situation when you may not financially be able to replace your TV.

So I'm sure some folks will chime in with "I put these on my 1/2 ton truck and now I tow a 15K fiver no problem". Just be cognizant that they are relating their experience/opinions as well. Just know that sooner or later, given enough time and exposure to mother nature and fate, your day to prove you're rig is safe will come.

JMHO
I agree totally.
It's a hard pill to swallow.
I had seen and heard enough in here to realize it works for now but what if.
I didn't want to see the what if. Stuck to trips closer to home on flat land and drove much slower. All the while seeking out a new vehicle.
I got lucky with much work in finding my new vehicle. I do believe if you look for it, you will find it. Stick to your budget, no matter what a couple of salesmen say. You'll find it.
Pore over weights for your current TT and the TV you will need, also think about the possibility of a TT / 5er upgrade in the future.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:01 AM   #44
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Flybouy, I’m not offended. Last night I was up researching and reading countless articles and forums. One article stated exactly that: The weakest link is the driver. And yes, it was a shock to find out this combo is a mismatch after using it “fine” for the last 3 years. What are the stages of shock? I don’t remember them all but believe it starts will denial and ends with acceptance.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:38 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by TJH View Post
Flybouy, I’m not offended. Last night I was up researching and reading countless articles and forums. One article stated exactly that: The weakest link is the driver. And yes, it was a shock to find out this combo is a mismatch after using it “fine” for the last 3 years. What are the stages of shock? I don’t remember them all but believe it starts will denial and ends with acceptance.
The 5 stages of grief that you reference are:
1. Denial and isolation;
2. Anger;
3. Bargaining;
4. Depression;
5. Acceptance

Not to "sermonize" that list, but if you look through any number of threads on this forum, you can see the 5 stages "in action" as posters go from being "pissed at the news" to "announcing their new tow vehicle in the longest running thread on the forum with almost 1700 posts" http://www.keystoneforums.com/forums...ead.php?t=7169

The important "take away" is that you recognize how to keep yourself and your family as safe as possible while enjoying your RV.
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Old 11-12-2019, 07:17 AM   #46
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More truck is better (within reason) Dad had a livestock feed business. I would travel 40 miles twice a day with 80 bags of feed which equaled 4,000 lbs. Day in.....day out, never a glitch with a 3/4 ton pick-up.
We always considered 1/2 ton trucks to be "city trucks", "Gentleman Farmers" trucks, city trucks.
Farmers and construction guys always used 3/4 ton trucks for tow ability and most important of all: CARRY CAPACITY.
A Ford F-250 either gas or diesel depending if you run mountains or not would be a great choice.
A friend of mine who was a Ford Service Manager has always steered me towards the gas side. He is a firm believer in the ability of the F-250. He always says it is closer to a 1 ton truck in ability than being a 3/4 ton truck.

We're still in a holding pattern to drop the coin on a Cougar as my wife is about two years from retirement. When we finally do it........it will be towed with a F-250 Gasser. I like Gas as my buddy says: parts are available everywhere, just about any shop anywhere can work on it if needed, between higher maintenance and additional cost of diesel it offsets the increase in MPG that the diesel gives. With proper P.M. the gasser will last as long as the diesel
BUT:
If we decide to run primarily Colorado or to the East West Va then I would be tempted to go Diesel simply to get the exhaust brake.
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Old 11-12-2019, 07:35 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by RET.LEO View Post
More truck is better (within reason) Dad had a livestock feed business. I would travel 40 miles twice a day with 80 bags of feed which equaled 4,000 lbs. Day in.....day out, never a glitch with a 3/4 ton pick-up.
We always considered 1/2 ton trucks to be "city trucks", "Gentleman Farmers" trucks, city trucks.
Farmers and construction guys always used 3/4 ton trucks for tow ability and most important of all: CARRY CAPACITY.
A Ford F-250 either gas or diesel depending if you run mountains or not would be a great choice.
A friend of mine who was a Ford Service Manager has always steered me towards the gas side. He is a firm believer in the ability of the F-250. He always says it is closer to a 1 ton truck in ability than being a 3/4 ton truck.

We're still in a holding pattern to drop the coin on a Cougar as my wife is about two years from retirement. When we finally do it........it will be towed with a F-250 Gasser. I like Gas as my buddy says: parts are available everywhere, just about any shop anywhere can work on it if needed, between higher maintenance and additional cost of diesel it offsets the increase in MPG that the diesel gives. With proper P.M. the gasser will last as long as the diesel
BUT:
If we decide to run primarily Colorado or to the East West Va then I would be tempted to go Diesel simply to get the exhaust brake.
The diesel torque is kinda nice in steep hills... I will say I would have liked to buy a gas truck but couldn't find a one ton gas truck in my price range (CHEAP). The 6.0 was in my price range as so many consider it a junk engine and they go cheaper than the 7.3 or 6.7. Nobody wants the 6.4. My truck has been fixed to where it is reliable. Cost me some but a lot less than buying a new truck. And please don't swallow the cool-aid on the diesel fuel mileage thing. 10 mpg towing and 14 not-towing. A one ton is too heavy to be a econo vehicle. Maintenance costs on a gas truck have to be less. My truck takes 287,000 quarts of oil at oil change time and filters all over the place add to this. I wanted a V10 but just couldn't find one. They are gas hogs too. Previously had a 7.5L super gas sucker and it was easy and cheap to maintain but was thirsty.

Last stupid comment... got a new battery for my camper. It weighs 47 lbs. Geesh those pounds can add up as far as eating load capacity of a truck. My load capacity is north of 4K lbs so don't have to quite eating pizza yet!
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Old 11-12-2019, 07:46 AM   #48
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We ran an F250 pulling a TT then a 5th wheel. It was a 460 ci. I installed 4.88 gears an a very expensive Gear Vendor OD. It would pull like a diesel - at about 5.5 MPG.
Yes, it worked. But I had to absolutely “thrash” that rig ALL THE TIME!

Then I bought my first diesel! Talk about a difference! My experience is that you can run all of the figures that you want on paper but at the end of the day, if you are doing serious towing, once you own a diesel you won’t go back to gas. Between Increased fuel mileage and resale value, my experience has been that the diesel is a smarter purchase If the primary purpose of the vehicle is towing. And when I tow now it’s a relaxing experience rather than a “thrashing”. JMHO
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Old 11-12-2019, 07:50 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RET.LEO View Post
More truck is better (within reason) Dad had a livestock feed business. I would travel 40 miles twice a day with 80 bags of feed which equaled 4,000 lbs. Day in.....day out, never a glitch with a 3/4 ton pick-up.
We always considered 1/2 ton trucks to be "city trucks", "Gentleman Farmers" trucks, city trucks.
Farmers and construction guys always used 3/4 ton trucks for tow ability and most important of all: CARRY CAPACITY.
A Ford F-250 either gas or diesel depending if you run mountains or not would be a great choice.
A friend of mine who was a Ford Service Manager has always steered me towards the gas side. He is a firm believer in the ability of the F-250. He always says it is closer to a 1 ton truck in ability than being a 3/4 ton truck.

We're still in a holding pattern to drop the coin on a Cougar as my wife is about two years from retirement. When we finally do it........it will be towed with a F-250 Gasser. I like Gas as my buddy says: parts are available everywhere, just about any shop anywhere can work on it if needed, between higher maintenance and additional cost of diesel it offsets the increase in MPG that the diesel gives. With proper P.M. the gasser will last as long as the diesel
BUT:
If we decide to run primarily Colorado or to the East West Va then I would be tempted to go Diesel simply to get the exhaust brake.
I have a 2016 F250 gas. Great truck. Love it. Rides just as nice as the F-150 I used to have. We own a grain business so I also have 1-2 tons in the bed on a regular basis.
First “long” trip with the trailer was 200 miles into a 20mph headwind the entire way. Truck pretty much camped out in third gear and 2500-3000 rpm’s the entire way. 5 mpg. Diesel would have been nice in that instance.

One piece of advise if going gas. Order the tallest gear ratio the factory offers. I think it’s either 4.10 or 4.33. Can’t remember. I have the 3.73 and while it’s fine it would have lowered the rpm or allowed the truck to get into 4th gear. Also it raises the max gcvw numbers (although you will probably max out somewhere else first.).
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Old 11-12-2019, 08:03 AM   #50
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I've towed heavy, 16.5k, 5th wheels with both gas & diesel trucks & would not go back to a gasser. The power difference is amazing then throw in the exhaust brake & you're comparing apples to oranges. I agree the fuel mileage is not much different til you get into the mountains, the diesel mileage won't change nearly as much as a gasser not to mention you won't have to have your right foot shoved through the firewall to keep it climbing.
As to maintenance, I quite honestly didn't notice much difference between the two. The diesel oil changes were every 10-15k instead of 3-5k, the oil filters cost the same, the oil cost the same per quart just took more, fuel filters if done myself were about $40 every 50k miles, all other maintenance is the same for both & everyone brings up the DEF which in my case was about $10-12 for 2.5 gallons every 3000-3500 miles which is pretty cheap per mile. The other advantage if towing a large RV with a diesel is you can always fill up at a truck stop without having deal with the idiots at the gas pumps.
If you're planning on going full-time with a RV 12k pounds or more I'd recommend a 350-3500 diesel truck, depending on weight doesn't have to be a dually, over the 250-2500 gasser & hit the road.
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