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Old 10-29-2019, 07:27 PM   #1
jmorse62
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3 Different tires On LHS177

I decided to check my tires today and found three different tires, in two different sizes. The tires on the trailer are 205/75/R14, one Karrier, and one Power King, The spare is a 205/75D15 ARIS. Two rims have triangle designs and one has circles. They all look in good condition but I don't like the mismatch issue. I bought the 2017 used last year. What tires does the LHS177 come with from the factory and what is the best tire upgrade.
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Old 10-29-2019, 07:59 PM   #2
bobbecky
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This is the specs for the current year:

https://www.keystonerv.com/travel-tr...&label=Current

And this is the specs for the 2016 model

https://www.keystonerv.com/travel-tr...archiveId=2200
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Old 10-29-2019, 08:47 PM   #3
CWtheMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmorse62 View Post
I decided to check my tires today and found three different tires, in two different sizes. The tires on the trailer are 205/75/R14, one Karrier, and one Power King, The spare is a 205/75D15 ARIS. Two rims have triangle designs and one has circles. They all look in good condition but I don't like the mismatch issue. I bought the 2017 used last year. What tires does the LHS177 come with from the factory and what is the best tire upgrade.
The first thing you should do is verify the designated size tires that came on the trailer as original equipment. You can find that information on the vehicle certification label. It's located on the left external section of the trailer forward of the axel.

Under the new RV trailer industry standard, none of the ST205/75R14 tires provide the necessary load capacity to satisfy the standard of 10% in load capacity reserves for your GAWR (4000#).

You should contact Keystone and inform them you want to abide the RVIA 10% reserve load capacity and need their recommendation for wheels/tires on your trailer. Your 4000# axle requires tires with at least 2200# of load capacity, each tire.

The regulations for spare tires are different as it's intended usage is as a spare. Its only requirement is to provide a load capacity equal to the OE tires. Spare tire information is also found on the certification label. I've seen bias ply spare tires on other manufacturer's trailers but not on Keystone.

Tires on an axle must be of the same designated size and design. The brand name does not matter.

For the best results with your replacement tires, the ST225/75R15 LRD would be my recommendation. They should work because the spare is 15". Ask Keystone.
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Old 10-30-2019, 02:09 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by CWtheMan View Post
The brand name does not matter.
Arenít some brands much better than others? e.g. MAXXIS 8008 or Goodyear Endurance? It sounds like a great opportunity for this RVer to equip his TT with quality tires.
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Old 10-30-2019, 02:34 AM   #5
flybouy
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Welcome.
You have been given good advise on finding out what size tire should be on your trailer. The next step is to check the manufactures date code to see how old the tires are. The "Newest" or most recently made tire is what I'd use as a spare IF it's less than 4 years old. Age is the killer of ST (special trailer) tires as is under inflation.
From your description it sounds like you have steel wheels that are not matched. Several web based suppliers offer "wheel and tire" combos where the tires are mounted on the wheels you choose and delivered to you.
. As for tire brand you could ask what brand beer you like and you'll get fewer answers. A few brands "rise to the top" if you will on folks reporting satisfying experiences.
In the end you must make that decision based on your use and budget. You are in the right place now and if you use the search function you will have enough reading material to last you a very long time. I'd suggest you start your search with the using the correct tire size for your unit as the search terms.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:07 AM   #6
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The date code mentioned is critical. Since you didn't notice the different brands and sizes you probably don't know how to determine the tire's manufacture date. There is a small oval on the side of the tire. It has four numbers. First two numbers are the week within a year and second two numbers are the year. Thus, a date code 2715 means 27th week of 2015 manufacture date. When buying new tires (which you probably should) check the date code as some may have been on a shelf for a LONG time before being sold to you.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:31 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newback View Post
Aren’t some brands much better than others? e.g. MAXXIS 8008 or Goodyear Endurance? It sounds like a great opportunity for this RVer to equip his TT with quality tires.
"Tires on an axle must be of the same designated size and design. The brand name does not matter."

In the context above, the designated size includes the tire design. Each brand name manufacturer must meet the size and design characteristics for a designated size.

Brands can be a very controversial subject driven by personal choice and particular brand experiences by each writer.

Bottom line; for the OP to gain the recommended reserve load capacity needed to meet the 10% above GAWR, a larger designated size will be required, because the OE size is not produced in a size that will provide that 10%. However, the OE tires do meet the minimum FMVSS requirement.
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Old 10-30-2019, 06:57 AM   #8
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Just a few thoughts about the entire situation:

1. The tires are a "cobbled together mix" of brands and sizes, the wheels (a fairly "permanent" part of the trailer, are different sizes and brands as well.

This gives me the impression that whoever owned (or took the trailer in for sale) "threw together parts to make it presentable. I'd have to ask why the wheels were exchanged and whether there was some damage that caused the replacements? If so, what else might have been damaged and/or replaced to make the trailer presentable for sale ???

2. If the tires are any indication, I'd very VERY carefully check the rest of the trailer for similar "cheap way out" repairs/replacements. If "they" (whoever "they" are) did this with tires, there is a real probability "they" also did it with sealing the roof, caulking the windows, hiding mold/rot under new vinyl flooring or a host of other "cheap fixes for real problems".....

Now, as for tires, if "appearance is key" buy what looks good in your opinion...
If reliability is the objective, as Cal stated, you can't buy 14" tires that meet the new RVIA weight standards, so you're going to need to upgrade to 15" wheels and also to heavier tires.

Which brand? There are three that immediately come to mind as "reported good results".. They are (in alphabetical order): Carlise Radial Trail HD, Goodyear Endurance and Maxxis 8008. All are ST tires, available in appropriate sizes to fit most common travel trailer sizes.

My thoughts (for what they might be worth) are this:
Goodyear Endurance was introduced about 3 years ago. They have earned a good reputation for being a reliable, trustworthy ST tire. HOWEVER, they have a limited "long term reputation or reliability". That may (or may not) reveal problems in the future years. Price is at the top of the ST tire range.

Maxxis was the "gold standard" for ST tires after the Goodyear Marathon moved "offshore to Chinese manufacture". It remains a good choice, but has not increased the speed rating above the 65MPH level. In today's RV market, faster towing speeds have "nearly become common place" and the Maxxis can easily be operated "outside its design parameters". If the owner does that, what happens to "tire reliability" ??? Maxxis pricing is also at the top of the ST tire range.

Carlisle Radial Trail HD (by brand and product name) a reliable ST tire that has a 5 year history and is an "improved version of the Radial Trail RH" which also had a 5-8 year history of reliable service before it was replaced by the newer tire version. It can be obtained from many tire distributors and is the most economically priced ST tire of the three (Endurance, 8008 or RT HD). WalMart currently has Carlisle Radial Trail HD tires available for nearly the same pricing as the "china bombs" that nearly everyone seeks to avoid.

So, quality tires from the 3 "best choices for typical RV use" are available at most tire distributors, if brand is important or cost is important, there are choices. If price is the factor and wheels are also to be included, you can buy two new wheels and three tires for your trailer by carefully shopping price and taking advantage of prices at different stores or internet sites. Buy the wheels where they are cheapest, buy the tires where they are cheapest, have someone "install the tires on the wheels at a local shop and then install them on your trailer. You'll save money that way, something that's probably important with this trailer update. HAVE THE TIRES BALANCED as a part of the installation.....

Also, don't limit your careful inspection of this trailer to "only the tires and wheels". My guess is that is only the beginning of "shortcuts taken to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear..... Buyer beware.....
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