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Old 11-07-2018, 04:15 PM   #191
Snoking
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Originally Posted by sourdough View Post
I'm wondering if your intention is to post information beneficial to members or just troll CW and continuously rap ST tires that most folks use....as the manufacturers recommend??
If you knew what the manufacturers paid Tredit and Tireco for a RV wheel and chinese ST tire you might change you feeling on the issue. If you see a china bomb ST235/80R16E at retail for 60 or 70 dollars, what do you think a train car load of them cost the trailer manufactures.

Lucky there are slowly becoming some better quality ST available, however it has been a long and bumpy road getting to this point. Cal's record speaks for it's self. He is all over the inter with many different user names promoting ST tires as if his is on the manufacturers payroll.

Enough said. Chris
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Old 11-07-2018, 04:34 PM   #192
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Snoking, "Enough said. Chris" If there is a god, and there certainly is, you will be telling the truth.
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Old 11-08-2018, 06:38 AM   #193
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Tire industry news has reported that Triangle Tires will soon be manufactured at a NC plant. The attached reference depicts their tire line-up.

They have added a ST235/80R16 LRF.

http://triangletireus.com/truck-tires/tr653/
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Old 11-08-2018, 02:39 PM   #194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoking View Post
If you knew what the manufacturers paid Tredit and Tireco for a RV wheel and chinese ST tire you might change you feeling on the issue. If you see a china bomb ST235/80R16E at retail for 60 or 70 dollars, what do you think a train car load of them cost the trailer manufactures.

Lucky there are slowly becoming some better quality ST available, however it has been a long and bumpy road getting to this point. Cal's record speaks for it's self. He is all over the inter with many different user names promoting ST tires as if his is on the manufacturers payroll.

Enough said. Chris
Chris, enough. This isn't the Duramax forum. Here, we all have to play nice and be courteous to each other.
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Old 11-08-2018, 03:09 PM   #195
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Originally Posted by rhagfo View Post
Our 2005 Copper Canyon came with LT 235/85-16Es even though my GVWR is 12,360. Being a 2005 I don't have the yellow sticker, just the VIN weight statement inside a cabinet door near the sink, where it holds up a lot better!
I do have an email from Keystone with the build information that states LT 235/85-16s were installed at the factory.

Just saying.
Russ

Russ. If your vehicle did not have the requires Vehicle certification label (GAWR, VIN, Tire Size and inflation plus other information) you need to file a complaint with NHTSA as your RV is not in compliance with DOT regulations and Coper Canyouis required to fix the situation. maybe all they will do is mail you a tticker. I don't know what they will do but theyMUST have the placard on the outside driver side toward the front. That's the law.
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Old 12-05-2018, 03:02 PM   #196
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Designated tire size

For the last couple of weeks I’ve been updating my vast library of tire references. In doing so I’ve determined that in many instances, I’ve been as negligent in writing about tire sizes, as many of the writers of official documents have been.

All of the references that I’ve updated have been more concise with tire descriptions. In the past, tire size was just a couple of words (tire size) put together to inform the reader what a topic might be about. The industry using that short two word phrase was being lackadaisical in their presentation. So was I. Tire size, in itself, does not actually describe a tire’s intended use. Its intended use is only evident when a vehicle manufacturer selects it for use on a specific vehicle. That is done in the vehicle’s final certification process. The governing body document, for RV trailer tires, is the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). So, here’s a list of designated tire sizes you may find on your trailer’s axles.

ST225/75R15
LT225/75R15
P225/75R15
215/75R17.5

The significance of the prefix in a tire’s designated size is to distinguish its basic design from other designs

The Rubber Manufactures Association (RMA) has recently renamed itself, US Tire manufacturers Association (USTMA). This is a quote from their current document of industry standards;

(“Replacement tires should be the same as the OE size designation, or approved options, as recommended by the vehicle or tire manufacturer. Never choose a replacement tire of a smaller size or with less load-carrying capacity than the OE tire size at the specified vehicle tire placard pressure.”)

You see, they have done it again. At least they set the precedent (size designation) early in the paragraph so they could shorten it later.
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Old 12-05-2018, 03:29 PM   #197
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Originally Posted by CWtheMan View Post
For the last couple of weeks I’ve been updating my vast library of tire references. In doing so I’ve determined that in many instances, I’ve been as negligent in writing about tire sizes, as many of the writers of official documents have been.

All of the references that I’ve updated have been more concise with tire descriptions. In the past, tire size was just a couple of words (tire size) put together to inform the reader what a topic might be about. The industry using that short two word phrase was being lackadaisical in their presentation. So was I. Tire size, in itself, does not actually describe a tire’s intended use. Its intended use is only evident when a vehicle manufacturer selects it for use on a specific vehicle. That is done in the vehicle’s final certification process. The governing body document, for RV trailer tires, is the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). So, here’s a list of designated tire sizes you may find on your trailer’s axles.

ST225/75R15
LT225/75R15
P225/75R15
215/75R17.5

The significance of the prefix in a tire’s designated size is to distinguish its basic design from other designs

The Rubber Manufactures Association (RMA) has recently renamed itself, US Tire manufacturers Association (USTMA). This is a quote from their current document of industry standards;

(“Replacement tires should be the same as the OE size designation, or approved options, as recommended by the vehicle or tire manufacturer. Never choose a replacement tire of a smaller size or with less load-carrying capacity than the OE tire size at the specified vehicle tire placard pressure.”)

You see, they have done it again. At least they set the precedent (size designation) early in the paragraph so they could shorten it later.
So, then.... it would be acceptable to replace an ST235/80R/16 with an LT235/85R/16 because SIZE does matter and the ST vs LT debate is dead... ? ? ?
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:50 PM   #198
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Originally Posted by Javi View Post
So, then.... it would be acceptable to replace an ST235/80R/16 with an LT235/85R/16 because SIZE does matter and the ST vs LT debate is dead... ? ? ?
Sorry you got that impression.

The FMVSS describes a LT tire as being designed for Light Trucks. The ST tire is a Special Trailer tire. Therefore, interchangeability would require approval from the vehicle manufacturer as per USTMA standards.
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Old 12-06-2018, 05:38 AM   #199
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After years of trailer tire debates, we can all be thankful that there are now much better offerings available.
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Old 12-06-2018, 07:41 AM   #200
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Originally Posted by Javi View Post
So, then.... it would be acceptable to replace an ST235/80R/16 with an LT235/85R/16 because SIZE does matter and the ST vs LT debate is dead... ? ? ?

I doubt that the debate is dead as long as some want to treat all customers/RV owners as an un-informed mass.


End users are not required to follow the regulations placed on Tire companies or RV assembly plants.


If you care about safety then you do need to follow the general guideline of ensuring that any replacement tire has equal or better specifications for Load and speed capacities. Some folks seem to have a difficulty in understanding the intent behind published standards and fall back on "Do exactly what the words say" nothing less and nothing more and certainly do not think for yourself.


Can you replace an ST235/80R16 with an LT235/85R16? It depends.


What is the load capacity of the ST tire? 2,600# @ 50psi or 3,000# @ 65 or 3420 @ 80 psi ? The example didn't identify the Load Range. Is the ST rated for 65 mph or 75 mph or greater? again incomplete information was provided in the question.



LT235/85R16 in a single application could be rated for 2,623# @ 65psi or 3,042#@80 or 3,415#@95 and the speed ratings could be anything from N ( 87mph) to I suppose H (130mph)


So if the original tire was an ST235/80R16 LR-E Speed L then an LT235/85R16 LR-F Speed N would not be recommended by any competent tire engineer. maybe a tire salesman would as he wants to make the sale.
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